Mainly Light Snow Expected in the East

Jon Erdman and Nick Wiltgen
Published: February 26, 2014

In just over a month's time, The Weather Channel has named ten winter storms, which averages out to one every three to four days.

The Northeast has been impacted by seven of these, while five storms have impacted — and in some cases, crippled — parts of the South.

(MORE: Science Behind Naming Winter Storms10 Cities With a Top Five Snowiest Winter)

Fortunately, we are now enjoying a break from big-name winter storms. There will be some minor disturbances bringing some snow over the next couple of days, but nothing to warrant the ominous-sounding name "Titan" in the East. Here's the forecast.

Background

Wednesday Forecast

Wednesday Forecast

Wednesday Forecast

Wednesday Forecast
Background

48-Hour Snowfall Forecast

48-Hour Snowfall Forecast

48-Hour Snowfall Forecast

48-Hour Snowfall Forecast

East Coast Snow

  • Through Wednesday: Into early Wednesday afternoon, light snow is possible from the central Appalachians and Virginia northeastward along the I-95 corridor to extreme southern New England; also some very light snow in the interior Northeast Wednesday from a separate low-pressure center. Some lake-effect snow east of Lake Ontario in upstate New York.
  • Wednesday night and Thursday: Another clipper-like low pressure system and cold front will bring a fast-moving swath of snow to mainly the interior Northeast. Cold air behind this system will trigger potentially heavy lake-effect snows east of Lake Ontario in upstate New York late Thursday into Thursday night.
  • Coastal snow amounts: Around 1 inch possible from D.C. to New York and points to the east including New Jersey and the Delmarva Peninsula.
  • Interior snow amounts: An inch or two possible by Wednesday morning in the mountains of West Virginia. In upstate New York, the two disturbances will combine to bring 3 to 8 inches of snow to parts of western and central New York, but much heavier totals are possible east of Lake Ontario due to the lake-effect snow, which could boost totals well over 1 foot in a narrow zone just north of Syracuse.

(CITY FORECASTS: Washington | Philly | NYC | Hartford | Boston)

Looking Ahead

It appears we'll be enjoying a bit of a reprieve from severe winter weather in the East, at least until the next round of stormy weather in California chugs its way eastward by the weekend or early next week. It is not clear whether this will be a major winter storm for the East Coast at this time, however we expect at least some snow in the region Sunday into Monday.

Check back with us at weather.com and The Weather Channel as we continue to monitor for future winter storms.

MORE: Winter Storm Pax Photos (Feb. 10-14)

Good Samaritans help push a stranded motorist stuck in deep snow on Stefko Boulevard Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014 in Bethlehem, Pa. (AP Photo/Chris Post)


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