WunderBlog Archive » Category 6™

Category 6 has moved! See the latest from Dr. Jeff Masters and Bob Henson here.

Wildfires Rage across California; Tropics Quiet for Now

By: Bob Henson 5:06 PM GMT on September 14, 2015

The explosive fire behavior that many Californians have been fearing all summer came to fruition over the weekend about 70 miles north of San Francisco, as the Valley Fire metastasized from an estimated 400 acres on Saturday to 50,000 acres on Sunday (see timeline at bottom of this page). The fire roared across the community of Middletown on Saturday night, prompting hasty evacuations and apparently destroying large parts of the town. One death has been confirmed by the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, and four firefighters from a helicopter crew were hospitalized with second-degree burns. Officials have had trouble confirming the amount of damage as the fire continued to rage nearby, but the National Interagency Fire Center reported in its daily update on Monday that at least 412 structures had been lost. The fire was zero percent contained, and close to 20,000 people have had to evacuate.

Two other large wildland fires are afflicting central California. The Butte Fire, which has scorched 65,300 acres and destroyed at least 214 structures since Wednesday, is now 25 percent contained, with more than 4500 firefighters on the scene and many structures still threatened. The long-burning River Complex Fire, which has roamed across 76,614 acres of far northern California since July 30, is 50 percent contained.


Figure 1. Firefighters create a firebreak near a home in Middletown, California, early on Sunday, Sept. 13, 2015, just ahead of the fast-growing Valley Fire. Image credit: AP Photo/Elaine Thompson.


Figure 2. A kitchen stove sits among the remains of a home on Sunday, Sept. 13, 2015, destroyed by the Butte Fire near Mokelumne Hill, California. Image credit: AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli.


Figure 3. The infrared signal from the Valley Fire was brighter and larger than Reno, NV, on this image collected early Sunday morning, September 13, 2015, by NASA’s Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). Image credit: NWS/Sacramento.


As discussed in this blog a couple of weeks ago, September and October are often the worst months for wildfire in California. The region’s Mediterranean climate leaves it high and dry during summer, so the impact of any drought during the previous winter’s wet season becomes exacerbated by the heat of summer and by the strong winds brought by autumn frontal systems and offshore Santa Ana winds. California is in the midst of a four-year drought on par with anything in the century-plus precipitation record, and state temperatures this year are the warmest on record by far. A new climate.gov analysis by Tom Di Liberto illustrates how tough it will be for California to dig itself out of its multiyear precipitation deficit: every region in California would need record-smashing rainfall this winter in order to bring the five-year totals (2011-12 through 2015-16) merely up to average.

Strong El Niños often bring wet conditions to Southern California, and the intensity of the emerging El Niño event may be enough to extend those above-average rainfalls into the central part of the state, as noted by the NOAA Drought Task Force in a report last month. However, even unusually heavy precipitation may not yield an above-average snowpack in the Sierra Nevada that could help boost water supplies next summer. Snowpack will depend hugely on how cold it is when the biggest storms hit the Sierra, and temperatures are at record warmth both globally and regionally.

Did pyrocumulus play a role?
I asked Daniel Swain, a Stanford University doctoral student and author of the excellent California Weather Blog, to weigh in on the situation. He responded late Sunday night with some clues as to what might have made the Valley Fire behave so explosively.

“It has been really disconcerting to watch this event to watch unfold over a little more than 24 hours. It became pretty clear last night that a true firestorm was underway--50,000+ acres in less than 24 hours and 40,000+ acres in less than 12 hours! What's amazing is that weather conditions were not particularly severe from a fire danger perspective. While there were some gusty winds and warm temperatures, that's not at all unusual for that part of the world. One strange thing did happen, though: a mid-evening ‘heat burst’/gusty wind event seems to have occurred across the North Bay and Lake County area yesterday, possible due to downdrafts from very weak mid-level convective clouds in the area. I've been sent a couple of photographs that suggest that the pyrocumulus cloud from the fire itself may have played a role in this strange event (which I followed with some of the wunderground PWSs, actually!), which would not be that surprising given the magnitude of the fire event. Still, the fact that the fire spread as fast and as far as it did given ambient weather conditions is nothing short of extraordinary.”

Pyrocumulus are the bubbling, cumuliform clouds that often form above large, intense wildland fires. The most spectacular pyrocumulus are sometimes called pyrocumulonimbus for their close similarity to cumulinumbus clouds, sometimes including lightning and anvil-shaped cirrus clouds. Pyrocumulonimbus can even inject aerosols into the stratosphere, according to NASA expert Michael Fromm and colleagues in this open-access article published in 2010 by the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. A NASA Earth Observatory article documents spectacular pyrocumulus captured in July 2014 by NASA’s Terra and Aqua satellites during California wildfires.


Figure 4. This view of a developing pyrocumulus cloud above the Oregon Gulch fire, a part of the Beaver Complex fire, was taken from an Oregon Air National Guard F-15C on July 31, 2014, at 8:20 pm PDT. Image credit: James Haseltine, via NASA Earth Observatory.

The role of drought and heat
In his email, Swain also stressed the preconditioning role of this year’s unprecedented combination of drought and heat:

“in some ways, this fire is a realization of widespread fears that California's worst drought on record had created the potential for truly extreme fire behavior this summer and fall. CALFIRE, the state agency tasked with fighting wildfires in California, has been emphatically and explicitly stating that the kinds of extreme fire behavior being observed on the Valley Fire (and other California fires this year) is not something that has been previously observed, and can be attributed directly to the severity of the ongoing, multi-year drought. This kind of on-the-ground assessment is consistent with a number of recent studies suggesting that the observed combination of extremely low precipitation and record-high temperatures is unprecedented in modern California. It's also a very sobering reminder that while many of the impacts of a severe drought are not as conspicuous as those during a more acute meteorological disaster--like a flood or a tornado--sometimes they can be truly and immediately devastating.

As for the week ahead, Swain’s outlook isn’t exactly optimistic:

“The Valley Fire still has zero containment, and is still spreading quickly. Clouds clear tomorrow and winds will start to pick up Tuesday in advance of that weak trough. I'm a bit worried about these pre-frontal winds (could hit 30-40 mph in the fire area), even though the trough itself may drop some light showers in the region. Does look warmer and drier once again after that, so it would be a temporary reprieve at best. Meantime, it seems that Linda's remnants will bring some rain to Southern California early this week (though the models seem to be all over the map with location/amount). If the higher end totals pan out, it'll put a temporary damper on fire season south of Santa Barbara (for perhaps a week or so), but historically that amount of rainfall does very little to mitigate the coming Santa Ana season, which is when most of SoCal's major fires occur.”

A rare September weekend: No tropical cyclones on Earth
We’re just past the climatological peak of the Atlantic hurricane season, and close to the peaks of North Atlantic hurricane and typhoon production as well. Yet for most of this weekend, we had no officially classified tropical cyclones anywhere on the planet. The disturbance shown just east of Vietnam in Figure 5 evolved into short-lived, minimal-strength Tropical Storm Vamco, which was bringing heavy rains early Tuesday local time as it approached the central Vietnam coast (see Figure 6). Varco’s formation ended a 54-hour streak with no tropical cyclones on Earth, the longest such streak to occur in any September since 2009, according to WU blogger Phil Klotzbach (Colorado State University).


Figure 5. At 1400 GMT (10:00 am EDT) on Sunday, September 13, 2015, there were no tropical cyclones anywhere on the planet. The disturbance shown east of Vietnam later became Tropical Storm Vamco. Image credit: Brian McNoldy, University of Miami/RSMAS.


Figure 5. Tropical Storm Vamco (purple blob at center) was moving onto the coast of Vietnam at 1611 GMT (12:11 pm EDT) on Monday, September 14.


Figure 7. This METEOSAT-9 satellite image, collected over the eastern tropical Pacific at 1500 GMT on Monday, September 14, shows tiny Invest 93L (left) and much larger Invest 95L (right). Image credit: NOAA/NHC.

Once Vamco is officially declassified, we may get a second global break from tropical cyclone activity before the next Atlantic system spins up. The most likely candidate is Invest 93L, located several hundred miles west-southwest of the Cape Verde islands at midday Monday. The National Hurricane Center gives 80% odds that this system will become a tropical cyclone by Wednesday. Models are in fairly close agreement that this system will develop into Tropical Storm Ida by midweek, but they also agree it should be recurving sharply by that point, posing no threat to North America or the Caribbean. A much larger tropical wave closer to the African coast, newly designated Invest 95L, is worth watching for potential development later this week. NHC gives this wave 40% odds of becoming a tropical cyclone by Saturday as it enters the central tropical Atlantic. Invest 94L, centered just east of Tampico, Mexico, is associated with a large area of showers and thunderstorms extending into the central Gulf of Mexico at the tail end of a decaying cool front. This system has a chance of developing into a short-lived tropical cyclone over the next several days (NHC gives it 30% odds over the next five days). It would most likely end up tracking westward into Mexico, although its slow development and weak steering currents add some uncertainty to the long-term outlook.

Bob Henson





Video 1. This heart-stopping video was taken by residents evacuating the Anderson Springs area, about five miles northwest of Middletown, California, at 8:30 pm Saturday, September 12, as the Valley Fire roared into the area. Image credit: mulletFive.

Fire Hurricane

The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

Reader Comments

@SteveSeman
Since 1877, Downtown Los Angeles has only had 2 days in Sept with 2"+ of rain. Today is one of them. Now at 2.28" and counting

Showing more dry in this 93L image...seems. It is trying : /
BB later all. Great info. Ty.
Quoting 502. Starhopper:


Showing more dry in this 93L image...seems. It is trying : /
BB later all. Great info. Ty.

I agree it's trying.... convection attempting to increase.


what up with the black lows!!
Quoting 503. tiggerhurricanes2001:


I agree it's trying.... convection attempting to increase.
Trying for nothing,just another fish.
Updated 11:00 am CIMMS shear chart................Pretty rough out there in the MDR, Caribbean, and Gulf with the small exception of the area over 93L:



507. MahFL
Look at these weird clouds blowing off the mountains in CA :

Quoting 507. MahFL:

Look at these weird clouds blowing off the mountains in CA :




Could it be smoke from the fires making it's way up the mountainsides then blowing off at the higher elevations?
We're getting a nice heavy downpour here in Winter Park right now, I am thinking we will end up with around an inch of rain from this round, which would bring our monthly total to very roughly ~3.25", at, or just a tad above normal for the first half of September. The yard couldn't look better (except for the 10,000s of weeds I still need to remove:).
Gulf looks good, but those little pieces of energy off the SE US coast almost make me watch closely for development





AND REMEMBER: SAY NO, TO NEGATIVITY!
Guess 93L becoming better organized..
Atlantic Tropical Weather Outlook


000
ABNT20 KNHC 151737
TWOAT

TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
200 PM EDT TUE SEP 15 2015

For the North Atlantic...Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico:

Shower and thunderstorm activity has become a little better
organized today in association with a well-defined low pressure
system located about midway between the Cape Verde Islands and the
Lesser Antilles. Some further development of this low is possible
during the next day or two while it moves generally northwestward.
After that time, however, upper-level winds are expected to become
unfavorable for development.
* Formation chance through 48 hours...medium...60 percent
* Formation chance through 5 days...medium...60 percent

A broad low pressure system is located about 350 miles south of the
southernmost Cape Verde Islands. Shower and thunderstorm activity
continues to show signs of organization, and environmental
conditions are expected to be conducive for the formation of a
tropical depression over the next few days while the system moves
west-northwestward at 10 to 15 mph.
* Formation chance through 48 hours...medium...60 percent
* Formation chance through 5 days...high...80 percent

$$
Forecaster Stewart
512. MahFL
Quoting 508. weathermanwannabe:



Could it be smoke from the fires making it's way up the mountainsides then blowing off at the higher elevations?


It's on the water vapor too, so likely clouds :

Quoting 510. Grothar:

Gulf looks good, but those little pieces of energy off the SE US coast almost make me watch closely for development





AND REMEMBER: SAY NO, TO NEGATIVITY!
NOTHING IS GONNA HAPPEN.THINK POSITIVE.
WE are absolutely getting crushed here in Altamonte Springs. Already 1.79" at the office and it still coming down in torrents.

Here are the current wild fire locations out West:

Quoting 508. weathermanwannabe:



Could it be smoke from the fires making it's way up the mountainsides then blowing off at the higher elevations?


That does appear to be from the Fire east of Fresno. I used the Fire tab on the Wunder map and that is in the right area.
Quoting 510. Grothar:

Gulf looks good, but those little pieces of energy off the SE US coast almost make me watch closely for development





AND REMEMBER: SAY NO, TO NEGATIVITY!


Grothar-
By saying 'no' wouldn't that be a negative?

1.72" for Riverside Municipal Airport, WU is showing 1.37" for Indian Hills(PWS). Sun is out for now,
there is more unless it slides off to the East before it gets here.
Quoting 494. Bucsboltsfan:



Erika?
opps good catch, sorry I meant Grace...
The Gulf area looks really ugly but pressures are still rising in the center of the BOC and steady on the SW coast as of the last hour:


Station SACV4
EPA & Mexican Government Cooperative Program
Location:
 19.174N 96.093W
Date: Tue, 15 Sep 2015 17:00:00 UTC
Winds: N (10°) at 7.0 kt gusting to 8.0 kt
Atmospheric Pressure: 29.92 in and steady
Air Temperature: 81.7 F
Dew Point: 75.0 F



Station 42055
NDBC
Location:
 22.203N 94W
Date: Tue, 15 Sep 2015 16:50:00 UTC
Winds: S (170°) at 1.9 kt gusting to 3.9 kt
Significant Wave Height: 5.2 ft
Dominant Wave Period: 7 sec
Mean Wave Direction: E (87°)
Atmospheric Pressure: 30.01 in and rising
Air Temperature: 83.8 F
Dew Point: 75.4 F
Water Temperature: 85.6 F
Widely separated rainbands moving across Central Florida out of the E/SE. No pressure drop at all. Perfect indication of easterly wave. Nothing more. A lot of rain about nothing at this time. Sorry boys and girls.
Quoting 514. StormTrackerScott:

WE are absolutely getting crushed here in Altamonte Springs. Already 1.79" at the office and it still coming down in torrents.




I see it's creeping to my house next! Hope it lets up by Saturday, Granddaughter's Birthday party planned outside!!
Quoting 518. rmbjoe1954:



Grothar-
By saying 'no' wouldn't that be a negative?


Positively!
Quoting 521. LargoFl:

opps good catch, sorry I meant Grace...


Figured that, I was just messing with ya.
Wildfires threaten California's treasured Sequoias




Link to full article.

Link
Thank you Ex Hurricane Linda! Rains just started at my place! Bring it on!


SRUS46 KSGX 151616
RRMSGX

RRMSGX

PRELIMINARY STORM PRECIPITATION TOTALS
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SAN DIEGO
900 AM PDT TUESDAY SEP 15 2015


_______24-HOUR PRECIPITATION TOTALS AS OF 900 AM TUESDAY_______


.TOP RAINFALL AMOUNTS FROM ALL ZONES

STATION PRECIP(IN) ELEVATION(FT)

1. KSOX RADAR SITE 2.01 3092
2. MODJESKA CANYON 1.74 1260
3. SANTIAGO PEAK 1.69 5660
4. YUCAIPA RIDGE 1.58 9020
5. FREMONT CANYON RAWS 1.45 1781
6. LAGUNA AUDUBON 1.42 314
7. E GARDEN GVE/WNTRSBRG 1.42 120
8. BEE CANYON 1.41 755
9. OCEANVIEW 1.41 43
10.SANTIAGO CREEK 1.41 1210


-------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------

.SAN DIEGO COUNTY COASTAL AREAS

STATION PRECIP(IN) ELEVATION(FT)
OCEANSIDE 0.27 30
SAN ONOFRE 0.12 162
ENCINITAS 0.12 242
GOAT CANYON 0.11 110
LAS FLORES RAWS 0.11 100
SOLANA BEACH 0.04 75
CARLSBAD 0.03 305
POINT LOMA 0.03 364
MONTGOMERY FIELD 0.02 423
KEARNY MESA 0.01 455


.SAN DIEGO COUNTY VALLEYS

STATION PRECIP(IN) ELEVATION(FT)
FALLBROOK 0.16 675
RAINBOW CAMP 0.12 1553
CAMP TRGT RANGE RAWS 0.12 917
SANDIA CK RD 0.10 342
BONSALL CRS 0.08 185
ALPINE RAWS 0.02 2041


.SAN DIEGO COUNTY MOUNTAINS

STATION PRECIP(IN) ELEVATION(FT)
PALOMAR OBSERVATORY 0.12 5560
BIRCH HILL 0.12 5645
PALOMAR MOUNTAIN RAWS 0.08 5530
DESCANSO RAWS 0.06 3480
PINE HILLS FS 0.05 3645
DESCANSO RS 0.05 3650
PINE HILLS RAWS 0.05 3600
VOLCAN MOUNTAIN 0.04 5410
LAKE CUYAMACA 0.04 4560
JULIAN RAWS 0.04 4240
PALOMAR CRS 0.03
MOUNT LAGUNA RAWS 0.03 5760
CAMERON RAWS 0.03 3443
HENSHAW DAM 0.01 2750
CAMPO 1N 0.01 2610
CAMPO ASOS 0.01 2609
OTAY MOUNTAIN RAWS 0.01 3283


.SAN DIEGO COUNTY DESERTS
NO PRECIPITATION REPORTED


.ORANGE COUNTY COASTAL AREAS

STATION PRECIP(IN) ELEVATION(FT)
LAGUNA AUDUBON 1.42 314
E GARDEN GVE/WNTRSBRG 1.42 120
BEE CANYON 1.41 755
OCEANVIEW 1.41 43
COSTA MESA 1.38 47
JOHN WAYNE AIRPORT 1.34 50
YORBA PARK 1.34 305
BREA 2W 1.30 340
YORBA RESERVOIR 1.30 300
SAN DIEGO CK @ CAMPUS 1.30 20
UPPER ALISO CREEK 1.30 560
CORONA DEL MAR 1.26 300
ALAMEDA STORM CHANNEL 1.26 339
BREA OLINDA 1.22 750
LAGUNA BCH @ WOODLAND 1.18 47
FULLERTON AIRPORT 1.12 96
MOULTON PEAK REPEATER 1.07 888
GARDEN GROVE 1.06 80
SANTA ANA ENGINEERING 1.02 170
UPPER OSO CREEK 1.02 420
PICO RETARDING BASIN 1.02 760
HUNTINGTON BEACH 0.98 20
SANTA ANA DELHI CHNL 0.98 24
ANAHEIM BARBER CITY 0.94 5
LAGUNA NIGUEL PARK 0.91 200
GILBERT RETARDING BSN 0.87 100
MILLER BASIN 0.83 220
FULLERTON CREEK 0.79 95
LAGUNA CYN REPEATER 0.79 530
COTO DE CAZA 0.75 730
BELL CANYON 0.68 700
SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO 0.63 75
WESTMINSTER CHANNEL 0.59 40
PETERS CANYON WASH 0.44 40
SANTIAGO CREEK 0.40 120
SAN JUAN GUARD 0.35 660
VILLA PARK DAM 0.11 560
SEGUNDA DESHECA 0.02 85


.SANTA ANA MOUNTAINS

STATION PRECIP(IN) ELEVATION(FT)
KSOX RADAR SITE 2.01 3092
MODJESKA CANYON 1.74 1260
SANTIAGO PEAK 1.69 5660
FREMONT CANYON RAWS 1.45 1781
SANTIAGO CREEK 1.41 1210
UPPER SILVERADO CYN 1.41 2880
SILVERADO MOTORWAY 1.14 3969
EL CARISO 0.47 2600
SYLVAN MEADOWS 0.43 1892
SANTA ROSA PLATEAU 0.28 1980
EL CARISO RAWS 0.24 2660


.RIVERSIDE COUNTY VALLEYS-THE INLAND EMPIRE

STATION PRECIP(IN) ELEVATION(FT)
NORCO 1.14 650
RIVERSIDE SOUTH 1.02 875
RIVERSIDE AIRPORT 0.62 847
WOODCREST DAM 0.59 861
PIGEON PASS DAM 0.55 1700
LAKE MATTHEWS RAWS 0.47 1522
CLARK RAWS 0.32 1718
MORENO-CLARK 0.24 1810
MURRIETA CK AT TENAJA 0.19 1100
RAILROAD CANYON DAM 0.12 1420
PERRIS CDF 0.12 924
BEAUMONT 0.07 2624
BEAUMONT RAWS 0.07 2680
GILMAN HOT SPRINGS 0.04 1511
FRENCH VALLEY AIRPORT 0.03 909


.RIVERSIDE COUNTY MOUNTAINS

STATION PRECIP(IN) ELEVATION(FT)
BANNING BENCH 0.15 3619


.COACHELLA VALLEY
NO PRECIPITATION REPORTED


.SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY VALLEYS-THE INLAND EMPIRE

STATION PRECIP(IN) ELEVATION(FT)
LITTLE CHINO CK 1.38 646
CHINO HILLS 1.26 988
CENTRAL VALLEY FIRE 1.18 1114
GLEN HELEN REG PARK 1.18 2000
RIALTO CHANNEL 1.07 1018
LARSON RANCH 1.06 2121
SAN SEVAINE CHANNEL 1.06 1144
RECHE CANYON 1.02 1021
DAY CANYON 0.99 1880
HEMLOCK BURN 0.99 2280
CUCAMONGA CANYON 0.98 1766
RIALTO AIRPORT 0.94 1418
SAN ANTONIO HEIGHTS 0.90 2335
SAN BERNARDINO CO YRD 0.90 1033
ONTARIO FS #4 0.87 1081
ELY BASIN 0.87 832
LYTLE CREEK CANYON 0.87 3060
GILBERT ST NR SBD 0.85 1120
RIALTO FIRE STATION 0.83 1211
SMALL CANYON DAM 0.83 1810
CAL ST SAN BERNARDINO 0.79 1556
CUCAMONGA BASIN 0.78 1551
PLUNGE CREEK CANYON 0.71 1590
ONTARIO AIRPORT 0.61 922
ELDER GULCH 0.59 2933
ELDER CREEK 0.59 1649
SAN TIMOTEO LANDFILL 0.47 1766
HIGHLAND PLUNGE CREEK 0.24 1911
CRAFTON RESERVOIR 0.24 2000
DALEY SPUR 0.22 2680
WILSON CREEK 0.16 2235
YUCAIPA REGIONAL 0.15 2620

.SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY MOUNTAINS

STATION PRECIP(IN) ELEVATION(FT)
YUCAIPA RIDGE 1.58 9020
CREST PARK 1.26 5624
DEER CREEK DAM 1.10 2917
CABLE CANYON 1.02 5516
STRAWBERRY CREEK 0.99 2986
CITY CREEK RANGER STA 0.98 2647
LYTLE CREEK RAWS 0.91 2790
PANORAMA POINT 0.90 3887
PHELAN LANDFILL 0.73 4099
CEDAR GLEN 0.71 5317
RAYWOOD FLATS 0.70 7097
BAILY CANYON 0.63 3388
OAK CREEK CANYON 0.59 3676
UPPER DAY CANYON 0.51 5768
DEEP CREEK 0.48 4839
OAK GLEN WATERSHED 0.40 4923
MANZANITA FLATS 0.38 3920
MORMON ROCK RAWS 0.23 3300
OAK GLEN FIRE 0.20 4664
CONVERSE RAWS 0.19 5200
SUMMIT VALLEY FIRE 0.16 3653
WILDWOOD CANYON 0.11 2946
FAWNSKIN RAWS 0.10 6903
HEART BAR 0.03 6690
BIG PINE FLAT RAWS 0.01 6908


.APPLE AND LUCERNE VALLEYS

STATION PRECIP(IN) ELEVATION(FT)
HELENDALE 0.18 2428
GRANITE MOUNTAIN RAWS 0.09 4720
ADELANTO 0.08 2896
VICTORVILLE LANDFILL 0.04 2959
DESERT KNOLLS WASH 0.02 2808

NOTICE...THIS REPORT CONTAINS PROVISIONAL DATA FROM AUTOMATED GAUGES. THE
ACCURACY OF THIS DATA HAS NOT BE VERIFIED.
ELEV=ELEVATION IN FEET. STATIONS ABOVE THE FREEZING LEVEL WILL NOT SHOW
ACCUMULATING PRECIPITATION.
530. vis0
CREDIT::NOAA + NHC

Wx20150914-15;1530utc ATL-T-Basin aniGif::(not a NOAA floater, its a vis0 sahhh-lider)


Wx20150915-1500UTCGoMx AniGif (see previous cmmnts in other blogs for colourKey)


i know i'm late but have a good reason...no my eDog didn't Byte my bits (01001010)....had2take Dad2commode, no not the Commodore 64 webberweather53.
531. MahFL
Quoting 528. Grothar:

Wildfires threaten California's treasured Sequoias




Link to full article.

Link


Got to make sure the tourist $$ don't dry up eh ?....sheesh.
Raining very very nice right now! Thank you Linda and most of all thank you Jesus!
533. beell
Quoting 481. islander101010:

93 is looking like it wants a name first

Quoting 482. hurricanes2018:

MAYBE!!


We have not reached the "M" storm yet. It would be "Ida". But a good name for a 2015 storm nonetheless.
Quoting 533. beell:



We have not reached the "M" storm yet. It would be "Ida". But a good name for a 2015 storm nonetheless.

Please don't skip that one! I was slightly excited to see my name used.
If Scott is right, Florida will need an arc by Spring. It might need one in 100 years, but that's besides the point.
Quoting 529. HurricaneHunterJoe:

Thank you Ex Hurricane Linda! Rains just started at my place! Bring it on!


SRUS46 KSGX 151616
RRMSGX

RRMSGX

PRELIMINARY STORM PRECIPITATION TOTALS
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SAN DIEGO
900 AM PDT TUESDAY SEP 15 2015


_______24-HOUR PRECIPITATION TOTALS AS OF 900 AM TUESDAY_______


.TOP RAINFALL AMOUNTS FROM ALL ZONES

STATION PRECIP(IN) ELEVATION(FT)

1. KSOX RADAR SITE 2.01 3092...........

............NOTICE...THIS REPORT CONTAINS PROVISIONAL DATA FROM AUTOMATED GAUGES. THE
ACCURACY OF THIS DATA HAS NOT BE VERIFIED.
ELEV=ELEVATION IN FEET. STATIONS ABOVE THE FREEZING LEVEL WILL NOT SHOW
ACCUMULATING PRECIPITATION.


Links are a good thing ;)
Quoting 535. ElConando:

If Scott is right, Florida will need an arc by Spring. It might need one in 100 years, but that's besides the point.
Quoting 536. JNFlori30A:



Links are a good thing!


So is not copying lengthy posts :p
Quoting 538. tornadodude:



So is not copying lengthy posts :p
FIXED!
540. MahFL
Quoting 528. Grothar:

Wildfires threaten California's treasured Sequoias


Those trees have been there 3000 years, what makes people think this fire will destroy them ? You can't tell me for sure that this is the worst fire in 3000 years ?
This is so exciting. There will be a tropical system heading toward Florida on October 1st! Should I start putting up my plywood now? LOL!

JeffMasters has created a new entry.
Some Soo Cal updated rainfall totals as of a hour ago, some decent totals for September. Nice totals in the mountains where it it needed worst of all to wet the forests and vegetation. By LINK! LOL

Link