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Paul ripped in half by shear; World Series rainout for Wednesday?

By: Dr. Jeff Masters, 1:53 PM GMT on October 24, 2006

In the Atlantic, there are no threat areas to discuss, and none of the models are forecasting tropical development over the next six days. In the Eastern Pacific, Hurricane Paul is being torn in two by wind shear of 15-30 knots, and it appears that the storm will not cause significant damage to Mexico. Satellite loops of Paul show that the shear has torn away the upper portion of the storm, which is approaching Baja. A smaller lower-level portion has been left behind, and is quickly dissipating. Los Cabos radar shows some heavy thunderstorms approaching Baja, but I don't expect winds of more than 50 mph to affect Baja. All of the computer models are forecasting that there will be very little left of Paul by the time it reaches the coast of mainland Mexico, north of Mazatlan, on Wednesday.


Figure 1. Latest satellite image of Paul, updated every 1/2 hour.

World Series forecast
Tonight's game in St. Louis between the Tigers and the Cardinals looks to have good (but chilly) weather. Skies should be clear with light winds and a game-time temperature of 43 degrees. It's a different story on Wednesday, when a developing low pressure system is expected to bring 12 or more hours of steady rain to St. Louis beginning at about gametime. I expect an 80% chance of a rainout of Wednesday's game. The situation is a little better for Thursday, but there are going to be thunderstorms around--possibly severe--into Thursday night. I give it a 30% chance of a rainout for Thursday. Expect to see some baseball being played Friday night in St. Louis to make up for a rainout!

Jeff Masters

The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

Reader Comments

Thanks for the update Dr. Masters.

thank you Dr. Masters
Wow...an entire season and still no worries.
Physic coming right up...sorry I am late!
OH man... now physics...I can't DO physics, but I'm a pretty good guesser so go ahead...humiliate me with my own inability to do math type things.
If they were smart, they would have built the new Busch stadium w/a retractable roof.
Tuesday Physics Question Of The Day:

EMAIL YOUR ANSWERS DO NOT POST....IT RUINS IT FOR OTHERS!!

Which is faster, rolling or sliding? Consider the two almost identical aluminum cylinders in the photograph below. One rolls without sliding, while the other slides without friction (to a good approximation) on four tiny ball bearings mounted at one end of the cylinder.




Suppose that they are started simultaneously from rest at the top end of an inclined plane, one rolling down the incline and the other sliding without friction, as shown in the photograph below.



As they race down the incline, what will happen?

(a) The rolling cylinder will get to the bottom of the incline first.
(b) The sliding cylinder will get to the bottom of the incline first.
(c) They will get to the bottom at the same time; the race will end in a tie.

Good Luck...EMAIL YOUR ANSWER
E-mailed! Did I get it right??
Paul down to TS. No hurricane hat trick for the Baja region, it looks like.
I mailed you back Zap....(smarty)
Gatorx..I tried this experiment myself with what I could find at home.All I could find was 2 Corona bottles......Neither made it to the end of the plank
Melly...good one! Best answer of all!
Thanks for the update Dr Masters:).

Ike I prefer the open stadiums, to expose the game to natural elements, at times can make it quite interesting.

Gathering #s from the navy site~ Paul is at 990mb & 60kts, looks like a Mexico landfall is eminant.

Xavier is kickin 927mb, at 115kts, the track has shifted more south & away from some islands.


Also of intrest is the blob that was born through the night, part of a tropical wave, that is approaching the lesser Antillies this morning. Shear is 0-15 in the area.


WALLACE's thoughts on it (NHC disscussion)~
TROPICAL WAVE IS ALONG 57W/58W S OF 19N MOVING W 10-15 KT.
SCATTERED MODERATE/STRONG CONVECTION IS WITHIN 120 NM EITHER
SIDE OF THE WAVE AXIS FROM 14N-19N AND WITHIN THE ITCZ
so what is the answer?
Gatorx what is the answer.
I am still waiting on a few of my regulars to email the answer to me....I will email the answer to you though....then I will post the full answer and explanation on the board.
>_> Hurricane paul looked storng yesterday. No another note...

Noo I want baseball to end so Fox can show there regular programing again GRR.
gatorx

u have mail ( with the correct answer I hope ) LOL
OK Answer below, sorry I have to go and won't be back until later, so to my regulars that I missed, I will give you a make up exam on Friday!

The answer is (b); the sliding cylinder will get to the bottom first. (thats the one with the ballbearings)

This behavior can be explained by consideration of conservation of energy. As either of the objects goes down the incline, its initial gravitational potential energy is converted into kinetic energy - energy of motion - so it gains speed.

In the case of the slider, because there is no frictional loss all of the initial potential energy is converted into linear kinetic energy. On the other hand, as the roller moves down the incline its potential energy is divide into two types of kinetic energy: translational (moving linearly) and rotational (circular motion). In the case of rolling, therefore, only part of the kinetic energy goes into linear motion, so the roller moves more slowly. In fact, the kinetic energy is equally divided between translational and rotational modes.

So many posted answers to this question, I will list later....but Saddlegait answered first and correct...you go girl!!!
woohoo...I got a physics answer right! I am in the zone today - my strategy for today's "let's break the boring routine" was to actually participate in the physics quiz and I GOT IT RIGHT...imagine the unlimited possibilities if I keep this up. I might even go into politics - NOT..
BTW...as a side note...Oreodog wanted to argue the answer with me...just like a lawyer!(kidding odog)
think about it...would you get to the bottom of the hill quicker on roller blades, or rolling on your side?
dobson - don't make it sound so simple. That was a very hard question! (that's my story and I'm sticking to it!)
I mean...it took a lot of brainwork to get that answer right...not just anybody could have done it ...right?
NASA AND NOAA ANNOUNCE ANTARCTIC OZONE HOLE IS A RECORD BREAKER

Oct. 20, 2006 NASA and NOAA scientists report this year's ozone hole in the polar region of the Southern Hemisphere has broken records for area and depth. The ozone layer acts to protect life on Earth by blocking harmful ultraviolet rays from the sun. The "ozone hole" is a severe depletion of the ozone layer high above Antarctica. It is primarily caused by human-produced compounds that release chlorine and bromine gases in the stratosphere. (Click NOAA satellite image for larger view of the analysis of the Southern Hemisphere total ozone as of Oct. 12, 2006, from the an instrument on board the NOAA polar orbiting satellite. Click here for high resolution version. Please credit NOAA.)

"From September 21 to 30, the average area of the ozone hole was the largest ever observed, at 10.6 million square miles," said Paul Newman, atmospheric scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. If the stratospheric weather conditions had been normal, the ozone hole would be expected to reach a size of about 8.9 to 9.3 million square miles, about the surface area of North America.

The Ozone Monitoring Instrument on NASA's Aura satellite measures the total amount of ozone from the ground to the upper atmosphere over the entire Antarctic continent. This instrument observed a low value of 85 Dobson Units (DU) on Oct. 8, in a region over the East Antarctic ice sheet. Dobson Units are a measure of ozone amounts above a fixed point in the atmosphere. The Ozone Monitoring Instrument was developed by the Netherlands' Agency for Aerospace Programs, Delft, The Netherlands, and the Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland.

Scientists from the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, Colo., use balloon-borne instruments to measure ozone directly over the South Pole. By Oct. 9, the total column ozone had plunged to 93 DU from approximately 300 DU in mid-July. More importantly, nearly all of the ozone in the layer between eight and 13 miles above the Earth's surface had been destroyed. In this critical layer, the instrument measured a record low of only 1.2 DU., having rapidly plunged from an average non-hole reading of 125 DU in July and August.

"These numbers mean the ozone is virtually gone in this layer of the atmosphere," said David Hofmann, director of the Global Monitoring Division at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory. "The depleted layer has an unusual vertical extent this year, so it appears that the 2006 ozone hole will go down as a record-setter."

Observations by Aura's Microwave Limb Sounder show extremely high levels of ozone destroying chlorine chemicals in the lower stratosphere (approximately 12.4 miles high). These high chlorine values covered the entire Antarctic region in mid to late September. The high chlorine levels were accompanied by extremely low values of ozone.

The temperature of the Antarctic stratosphere causes the severity of the ozone hole to vary from year to year. Colder than average temperatures result in larger and deeper ozone holes, while warmer temperatures lead to smaller ones. The NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction provided analyses of satellite and balloon stratospheric temperature observations. The temperature readings from NOAA satellites and balloons during late-September 2006 showed the lower stratosphere at the rim of Antarctica was approximately nine degrees Fahrenheit colder than average, increasing the size of this year's ozone hole by 1.2 to 1.5 million square miles.

The Antarctic stratosphere warms by the return of sunlight at the end of the polar winter and by large-scale weather systems (planetary-scale waves) that form in the troposphere and move upward into the stratosphere. During the 2006 Antarctic winter and spring, these planetary-scale wave systems were relatively weak, causing the stratosphere to be colder than average.

As a result of the Montreal Protocol and its amendments, the concentrations of ozone-depleting substances in the lower atmosphere (troposphere) peaked around 1995 and are decreasing in both the troposphere and stratosphere. It is estimated these gases reached peak levels in the Antarctica stratosphere in 2001. However, these ozone-depleting substances typically have very long lifetimes in the atmosphere (more than 40 years).

As a result of this slow decline, the ozone hole is estimated to annually very slowly decrease in area by about 0.1 to 0.2 percent for the next five to 10 years. This slow decrease is masked by large year-to-year variations caused by Antarctic stratosphere weather fluctuations.

The recently completed 2006 World Meteorological Organization/United Nations Environment Programme Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion concluded the ozone hole recovery would be masked by annual variability for the near future and the ozone hole would fully recover in approximately 2065.

"We now have the largest ozone hole on record for this time of year," says Craig Long of the NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction. As the sun rises higher in the sky during October and November, this unusually large and persistent area may allow much more ultraviolet light than usual to reach Earth's surface in the southern latitudes.

In 2007 NOAA, an agency of the U.S. Commerce Department, celebrates 200 years of science and service to the nation. Starting with the establishment of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey in 1807 by Thomas Jefferson much of America's scientific heritage is rooted in NOAA. The agency is dedicated to enhancing economic security and national safety through the prediction and research of weather and climate-related events and information service delivery for transportation, and by providing environmental stewardship of the nation's coastal and marine resources. Through the emerging Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), NOAA is working with its federal partners, more than 60 countries and the European Commission to develop a global monitoring network that is as integrated as the planet it observes, predicts and protects.

NASA AND NOAA ANNOUNCE ANTARCTIC OZONE HOLE IS A RECORD BREAKER

Oct. 20, 2006 NASA and NOAA scientists report this year's ozone hole in the polar region of the Southern Hemisphere has broken records for area and depth. The ozone layer acts to protect life on Earth by blocking harmful ultraviolet rays from the sun. The "ozone hole" is a severe depletion of the ozone layer high above Antarctica. It is primarily caused by human-produced compounds that release chlorine and bromine gases in the stratosphere. (Click NOAA satellite image for larger view of the analysis of the Southern Hemisphere total ozone as of Oct. 12, 2006, from the an instrument on board the NOAA polar orbiting satellite. Click here for high resolution version. Please credit NOAA.)

"From September 21 to 30, the average area of the ozone hole was the largest ever observed, at 10.6 million square miles," said Paul Newman, atmospheric scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. If the stratospheric weather conditions had been normal, the ozone hole would be expected to reach a size of about 8.9 to 9.3 million square miles, about the surface area of North America.

The Ozone Monitoring Instrument on NASA's Aura satellite measures the total amount of ozone from the ground to the upper atmosphere over the entire Antarctic continent. This instrument observed a low value of 85 Dobson Units (DU) on Oct. 8, in a region over the East Antarctic ice sheet. Dobson Units are a measure of ozone amounts above a fixed point in the atmosphere. The Ozone Monitoring Instrument was developed by the Netherlands' Agency for Aerospace Programs, Delft, The Netherlands, and the Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland.

Scientists from the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, Colo., use balloon-borne instruments to measure ozone directly over the South Pole. By Oct. 9, the total column ozone had plunged to 93 DU from approximately 300 DU in mid-July. More importantly, nearly all of the ozone in the layer between eight and 13 miles above the Earth's surface had been destroyed. In this critical layer, the instrument measured a record low of only 1.2 DU., having rapidly plunged from an average non-hole reading of 125 DU in July and August.

"These numbers mean the ozone is virtually gone in this layer of the atmosphere," said David Hofmann, director of the Global Monitoring Division at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory. "The depleted layer has an unusual vertical extent this year, so it appears that the 2006 ozone hole will go down as a record-setter."

Observations by Aura's Microwave Limb Sounder show extremely high levels of ozone destroying chlorine chemicals in the lower stratosphere (approximately 12.4 miles high). These high chlorine values covered the entire Antarctic region in mid to late September. The high chlorine levels were accompanied by extremely low values of ozone.

The temperature of the Antarctic stratosphere causes the severity of the ozone hole to vary from year to year. Colder than average temperatures result in larger and deeper ozone holes, while warmer temperatures lead to smaller ones. The NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction provided analyses of satellite and balloon stratospheric temperature observations. The temperature readings from NOAA satellites and balloons during late-September 2006 showed the lower stratosphere at the rim of Antarctica was approximately nine degrees Fahrenheit colder than average, increasing the size of this year's ozone hole by 1.2 to 1.5 million square miles.

The Antarctic stratosphere warms by the return of sunlight at the end of the polar winter and by large-scale weather systems (planetary-scale waves) that form in the troposphere and move upward into the stratosphere. During the 2006 Antarctic winter and spring, these planetary-scale wave systems were relatively weak, causing the stratosphere to be colder than average.

As a result of the Montreal Protocol and its amendments, the concentrations of ozone-depleting substances in the lower atmosphere (troposphere) peaked around 1995 and are decreasing in both the troposphere and stratosphere. It is estimated these gases reached peak levels in the Antarctica stratosphere in 2001. However, these ozone-depleting substances typically have very long lifetimes in the atmosphere (more than 40 years).

As a result of this slow decline, the ozone hole is estimated to annually very slowly decrease in area by about 0.1 to 0.2 percent for the next five to 10 years. This slow decrease is masked by large year-to-year variations caused by Antarctic stratosphere weather fluctuations.

The recently completed 2006 World Meteorological Organization/United Nations Environment Programme Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion concluded the ozone hole recovery would be masked by annual variability for the near future and the ozone hole would fully recover in approximately 2065.

"We now have the largest ozone hole on record for this time of year," says Craig Long of the NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction. As the sun rises higher in the sky during October and November, this unusually large and persistent area may allow much more ultraviolet light than usual to reach Earth's surface in the southern latitudes.

In 2007 NOAA, an agency of the U.S. Commerce Department, celebrates 200 years of science and service to the nation. Starting with the establishment of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey in 1807 by Thomas Jefferson much of America's scientific heritage is rooted in NOAA. The agency is dedicated to enhancing economic security and national safety through the prediction and research of weather and climate-related events and information service delivery for transportation, and by providing environmental stewardship of the nation's coastal and marine resources. Through the emerging Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), NOAA is working with its federal partners, more than 60 countries and the European Commission to develop a global monitoring network that is as integrated as the planet it observes, predicts and protects.

now it post
Taz.Being blonde..It took me til the last sentence to realize that I just read it before.....Deja Vu all over again
hi anyone checking out the blob by the lesser antilies ? today
30. 0741
it look like area east of islands is coming apart
Here's WILLIS's thoughts on it in the 2:05~
TROPICAL WAVE IS ALONG 58W...JUST E OF THE WINDWARD ISLANDS...S
OF 19N MOVING W 10-15 KT. BROAD CYCLONIC TURNING EVIDENT IN THE
LOW TO MID CLOUD FIELD...WITH NUMEROUS MODERATE/ISOLATED STRONG
CONVECTION FROM 12N-18N BETWEEN 54W-61W.

I posted about it earlier, they've added the cyclonic turning since this morning.
Yeah the blob seems to be suffering from daytime heating & some shear on the NE side. The Shear maps are all over the place for the shear in that area the next few days. No models call for it to even remotely develop. The gfs calls for about 2" of rain, for the Lesser Antillies over the next few days.
Impressive surge of surface outflow (= collapsed convection) too. RGB Loop
Good afternoon,

On this very same day one year ago exactly Wilma was making here way threw south florida leaving thousands of people with out power and also bringing extensive damage with it.Here are a few pics of that day.







had a phyics test today
Actually cyclone that was exactly the point -

"In the case of the slider, because there is no frictional loss all of the initial potential energy is converted into linear kinetic energy"
Cyclone...i don't think you are correct...but nice try.
thank you cb...it was stating the obvious.
Cyclone...the test was performed the slider won...I saw it with my own eyes..
hello we now have 95P
Ok Cyclone from the question -

"Suppose that they are started simultaneously from rest at the top end of an inclined plane, one rolling down the incline and the other sliding without friction, as shown in the photograph below."

46. IKE
Posted By: Skyepony at 10:20 AM CDT on October 24, 2006.

Thanks for the update Dr Masters:).

Ike I prefer the open stadiums, to expose the game to natural elements, at times can make it quite interesting.


This isn't the NFL...baseball wasn't meant to be played in freezing temps.
cyclone come to my blog a moment
Hey Taz, had just noticed that, another S. Hemisphere invest. Zavier has gone from a Cat 4 to 3 since this morning & Paul is somewhat exposed....


Also convection is beginning to build back on the Antillies blob.

lol Ike~ Yes, the mud factor isn't as interesting but high winds can come to play. Seems a game or race is to made more intreging when exposed to chaos created by the element of weather ~ atleast to me.
That was how the question was asked - I agreed with you from the beginning when I said that was exactly the point - you just made it more complicated than the question required. I dont suppose you use any assumptions in your "tunnel theory" though -- LOL.
: Skyepony this new one call 95P has 997mb dos that seen like they ues to start them off at
good to see that mexico will be spared..
Seems low Taz. The navy has it at 15kts so perhaps the the pressure in the general area is lower.
Is that a cyclonic rotation I see at around 82W 17N?
Thanks Masters!
HI :)
Me have updated blog. Me want you come see!
Link 155 MPH winds!!!!!!! :)
Stormchasher,

are you trying to post pics?
Yeah i know how to do it but i got screwed up!!!! :(
I pressed delete.
Mitch was 180 mph at peak intensity. Link
Yeah I when that that happens :( :|
heres a cool image to look at Link STill mitch
Yeah thats something ecspecialy for october!! :)
If conditions were favorable, we could still (God forbid) have a storm like Mitch - or Wilma:

hi stormchaser
stl what is that monster east of barbados
Nothing to be concerned about at the moment. Shear is low ahead of it, but I doubt that conditions will be able to stay favorable long enough for any development to occur (remember that even Wilma took a few days to organize before it blew up). Shear/shear tendency map
Hi ryang!! :0)
MAIL CALL FOR RYANG!!
>
I have posted a blog in rememberance of Hurricane Wilma on my site.

Please come check it out:
www.Hurricaneworld.com
TWOEP
TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK
NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
400 PM PDT TUE OCT 24 2006

...

A DISORGANIZED AREA OF SHOWERS HAS FORMED ABOUT 200 MILES
SOUTH-SOUTHEAST OF ACAPULCO MEXICO. SOME SLOW DEVELOPMENT OF THIS
SYSTEM IS POSSIBLE OVER THE NEXT DAY OR SO AS IT MOVES TOWARD THE
WEST AT ABOUT 10 MPH.

...
ryang, are you in B'dos???
Recon flew Paul today...they've already headed home. Not real impressive.

Storm PAUL: Observed by AF #308
Storm #17 In Eastern Pacific Ocean
Total Flights For Storm #17: 02
Date/Time of Recon Report: October 24, 2006 19:15:50 Zulu
Position Of The Center: 19 58 ' N 111 26 ' W (19.97 N 111.43 W )
Minimum Height Measured At Standard Level Of 850 Millibars: 1421 Meters (Normal: 1457 Meters)
Maximum Surface Winds Were Estimated At: 25 Knots (28.75 MPH)Estimated Surface Winds Were Measured At: 029 Nautical Miles (33.35 miles) From Center At Bearing 221
Maximum Flight Level Winds Near Center Were 030 Knots (34.5 MPH) From 307
Maximum Flight Level Winds Were Measured 027 Nautical Miles (31.05 Miles) From Center At Bearing 221
Minimum Pressure: 999 Millibars (29.499 Inches)
Maxium Flight Level Temperature / Pressure Altitude Outside The Eye: 21C (69.8F) / 1525 Meters
Maximum Flight Level Temperature / Pressure Altitude Inside The Eye: 25C (77F) / 1524 Meters
Dewpoint Temperature / Sea Surface Temperature Inside The Eye: 17C (62.6F) / NAC (NAF)
Eye Wall Was Characterized As Being: NA
Eye Form Was Characterized As Being: NA
Center Fix Established Using: Penetration Wind Pressure Temperature
Center Fix Established At Level(s): 850 Millibars
Navigational Accuracy Measured At: 0.02 Nautical Miles
Meteorological Accuracy Measured At: 2 Nautical Miles

Other Information:
1: Maximum Flight Level Winds Were 53 KT E Quadrant at 17:50:00 Z


everybody left????????????
well bah and humbug. I left too..........
Hello Pottery
Why, hello wischcaster. whats up on the eastern front off the islands tonight? looks like rains are a- coming....
Today it was FREEZING HERE IN RICHMOND VA!!!! The high was 45 degrees! Tonights low is only 2 degrees above freezing!
tropicfreak, that sounds a little chilly for me.......today was a 85 here with 2" of rain in my gauge
are there any disturbances out in the atlantic
What a difference! I was freezing, even with my sweatshirt!
Dry air and wind shear should kill it.


The NWS, HPC, SPC, et al forecast a big rain event tomorrow and Thursday - hopefully they are right.
A 40 degree difference
nothing in the atlantic except rain east of barbados. but their forecast is not alarming. just another day in paradox..........
alright
pottery, check the forecast for richmond so I could prove it.
actully the low for tonight is soposed to be 2 degrees below freezing.
tropic, I checked it, but I didnt doubt you at all. how cold does it get there in VA ??
sometimes in jan/feb it can get down to 70 here in the early morn. the whole island is late for work when that happens. brrrrrrrrr man.
actually,I can feel a cold spell coming on now, so I"m going to take a hot shower and head to bed. its 8.53 pm here and all..............
is everyone gone for the night ?
guess so
tomorrow then
101. BtnTx
I think the WU servers are having a hard time keeping up with the heavy traffic on this blog-LOL
102. BtnTx
Another neat feature of WU blogs is that one can blog to themself. Kind of reminds me of the the Mr. Bean show where he mailed Christmas cards to himself so he would get some Christmas cards in the mail!
rodrigo0 is reporting from La Paz in Baja California. translation
105. BtnTx
Wishcasterboy - I don't think that pic is of Mr Bean. Oh my gosh I am going to have to come up with weather related subject or exit this blog.


Tropical Depression 02F assigned by Nadi, Fiji.

so this is in the south central pacific..
107. BtnTx
LowerCal, no habla espanol, but don't mind the post.
BtnTx just click the link, Google translated it for you ... more or less. At least you won't have to blog yourself, LOL.
110. BtnTx
Good Wishcasterboy as that is a pic of Mr. Bean being happy about weather!
111. BtnTx
Lowercal - not on this semi broken laptop that I recently (up) graded.
I read about your problem on your blog. Too bad you can't switch to MEPIS Linux like I did.
Hello and good evening from shivery Northeast Florida. Just had to pop in and say hello to all the diehards...
114. BtnTx
LowerCal - I could switch, but I have to support windows at my job, so I choose to suffer accordingly.
Good evening aquak9.
I understand. You need to feel your client's pain, LOL.
117. BtnTx
Good night all as sleepy sandman has taken over the weather for me tonight.
Good night BtnTx. I'm going too.
G'nite to the good Dr.'s blog. An honor, as always.
NOAA has put out a graphic where you can track the doldrums ~ areas with less then 5mph surface wind. They've figured out the doldrums is one of the many stresses that bleach coral.
Paul has been reduced to a TS.
Some pics of Mexico preparing for Paul, his waves, their officals...followed by some funny pics of Max Mayfield, then they pretty much go into sports as the slideshow goes on.
fixed that broken translation (for good I hope)
Morning Nash.
Morning everyone. Wow the Central Pac has been really active this yr..