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More tornadoes for the Plains

By: Dr. Jeff Masters, 1:26 PM GMT on March 30, 2007

Severe weather and tornadoes continued to pound the Plains yesterday, and more severe weather is on the way today. On Thursday, four tornadoes ripped through Oklahoma, including a twister that hit the northwest suburbs of Oklahoma City. This tornado damaged 50 buildings and injured four people. All of the injuries were were people in mobile homes or vehicles, as is typical for tornado victims. Thursday's four twisters came a day after 65 tornadoes swept through Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, and Nebraska, killing four people. A tornado in Holly, Colorado did extensive damage, killing one person and injuring eleven. It was the first tornado fatality in Colorado since 1960. The two tornado fatalities in Oklahoma Wednesday were that state's first deaths in five years. One other person died in a tornado that struck the Texas Panhandle Wednesday. Several of Wednesday's tornadoes were strong EF2s with winds of 111 - 135 mph. Damage surveys have not yet been completed on the Holly, CO tornado, and most of the other 65 tornadoes from that day.

Expect another significant severe weather outbreak late this afternoon in the Plains, according to the latest severe weather outlook from the Storm Prediction Center. They have placed Central Texas, including Dallas/Fort Worth, in their "Moderate Risk" area for severe weather. Four tornadoes have already touched down in Texas this morning, but none caused significant damage. Flash flooding and large hail--including baseball sized hail--have also occurred in Southwest Texas this morning. Keep an eye on the Central Texas radar (Figure 1) all day, as these severe thunderstorms grow in intensity and start spawning tornadoes.


Figure 1. Current radar for Central Texas.

Jeff Masters
Wild Night
Wild Night
In the Kansas Colorado and Nebraska there were reported 60+ tornadoes

Tornado

The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

Reader Comments

Getting some strong storms rolling through San Antonio right now.
Hey anyone here?
Does anyone have any idea what we can expect in the form of African Dust this Hurricane season? This is the only hope I can see of a realtively calm season on the Gulf Coast with La Nina....I guess we could also hope the tradewinds will be in our favor, maybe the Bermuda High...but, I am thinking African Dust...What influences it?
Lisa
Is this current rough weather pattern in the US a result of La Nina?
check out the storm relative velocity for the Tornadic supercell to the sw of san angelo
well a calm season isn't too much to ask for. the wind shear patterns so far have been quite interesting. I think there might be a chance for african dust this season, but not a lot. it should be a moderate season.
will the storm season have an effect on corn this year?
Is this current rough weather pattern in the US a result of La Nina?

Well...

La Nina Probably Contributed to Huge Tornadoes

Cooler than normal ocean temperatures in the mid-Pacific, called La Nina, have caused many bizarre weather effects in North America, including record snow and monster tornadoes.

Start Date: 5/10/99

A rash of killer tornadoes that swept through the midwest United States in early May -- including at least one giant F-5, the most powerful category, packing winds approaching 300 miles per hour -- were driven in part by La Nina, scientists say. The cold-water condition in the mid-Pacific ocean, also credited with dropping a record 91 feet of snow on mountains in Washington state this winter, can be expected to produce more devastating tornadoes in the coming months. Already the number recorded this season is running ahead of normal expectations.
"The signal is there," said Steve Byrd, science officer for the National Weather Service in Omaha, Neb. "The incidence of tornadoes on the central Plains is slightly higher during La Nina."

The monster F-5 tornado that hit Oklahoma City, Oklahoma on May 3, 1999 may be one of the most powerful twisters ever recorded. It cut a path of destruction 19 miles long and nearly one mile wide and stayed on the ground for a full hour -- an unheard-of duration for normal tornadoes.

La Nina causes a colder-than-normal jet stream over the continental United States, which mixes with warm moist air coming up from the Gulf of Mexico to produce ideal tornado conditions. Scientists studying global climate change warn that more extreme El Nino and La Nina conditions can be expected in the future, bringing more extreme weather patterns as well.


Also, I think that the hurricane season is going to be like 1995 in terms of activity (active hurricane cycle + La Nina, possibly strong = all hell breaks loose).
Thank you all, I will check back later to see if anyone else has any insight.
Lisa
your welcome
With the El Nino being such a disapointment I can only hope the same for La Nina.
hellow everyone
can anyone give me a weatherforcast for ocala national forest ...dew points vapor pressures etc..( i have looked but cant find data. i am camping this weekend with family and i hear alexander springs has great fog in the morning in the spring and i hope to catch a pic for everyone( and i am far to lazy to get everymoring @5 am!
Does La Nina actually impact tornadoes? Roger Edwards's Online Tornado FAQ suggests that it doesn't. However, this year a potentially major La Nina is developing, and we've had several EF4 tornadoes so far with the peak of the Midwest/Plains season still two months away. I think that one of the most recent ones could be an EF4 as well; there were reports of a house being "flattened." If you look at the NCDC database of severe storm events, then there have not been many F4 tornadoes per year since 1999, which as we all know was a major La Nina year.

The ENSO-tornado connection really intrigues me and I'm hoping that a definitive answer can be found. It really does seem that La Nina increases the number of violent tornadoes, despite Edwards's answer, although I don't know how that could happen. La Nina is a huge-scale event and a tornado is small and highly localized. I guess it could just increase the sheer number of tornadoes, thereby increasing the numbers of violent ones as well.
La Nina is a huge-scale event and a tornado is small and highly localized.

Yeah, but this tells me that La Nina definately can affect the number or intensity of tornadoes (because while tornadoes are highly localized, La Nina/El Nino changes the large-scale environment - which in turn affects tornado formation and intensity) - just as it affects the number and intensity of hurricanes. Also, it may affect the location of tornadoes - El nino often sees more in the Southeast and La Nina in the central U.S.
Sterling City, TX take cover... Looks like the tornados are back for more.
hurricant~ Ocala forecast
two things one.. skyepony always comes through.. two... i am a village idiot for not thinking of ummm uhh NOAA

thanks so much..
In answer to Lisas question about African dust, Joseph Prospero of the University of Miami, who has been tracking the amount of Saharan dust reaching his measuring equipment in Barbados since 1965, reported:

The strong correlation of dust with rainfall deficits does not necessarily mean that rainfall itself (or the lack of it) is the dominant mechanism responsible for the correlation. Dust concentrations in Barbados are the end result of many processes, including variations in dust emissions in the source regions, changes in dust transport paths, and changes in removal during transit, especially by precipitation. Changes in meteorology in the source regions (e.g., wind speed or gustiness) associated with large-scale climate variability could play a major role. Indeed, most major dust peaks appear to be associated with major El Nino events, which lead the dust peak by 1 year. Deficient SS rainy seasons have been linked to El NinoSouthern Oscillation (ENSO) events and the strength of the West African monsoon to an interhemispheric contrast in tropical Atlantic sea-surface temperature anomalies. (SCIENCE VOL 302 7 NOVEMBER 2003)

If I understand that correctly, it appears that there could be a peak in the amount of African dust this summer, depending on how "major" last year's El Nino was.

A large amount of Saharan dust, however, may not necessarily mean a significant decrease in tropical storm activity in the Atlantic. According to an article in the Christian Science Monitor:

In 2005, the year of Katrina and Rita and the most active hurricane season on record, more Saharan dust arrived in the Caribbean than at any time during the previous 30 years, says Joseph Prospero, director of the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies at the University of Miami.

"It goes completely contrary to our argument," Mr. Prospero says, adding that many other factors, like the location of high-pressure systems over the Atlantic and El Nino in the Pacific, affect hurricane formation.
The dust is arguably an enemy, unless it extends all the way into the Gulf and Caribbean. The dust is what kept the 2005 Atlantic Ocean systems from developing and recurving at sea. They stayed small and disorganized from the dust, were steered west by the low-level currents, entered the Gulf and Caribbean where the water was hot and the air was moist, and just exploded. Katrina is Exhibit A of this phenomenon.
hurricant~ Your welcome, had the national map open already, just keep clicking in the spot you want a forecast:)

LouisC~ well put. I have the expected rainfall maps of Africa up in my blog for the next few months. Looks pretty feast or famine like. I'll leave them up the rest of the day. Clicking on my screen name will take you there.


Here's fresh dust rising.
it all comes down to african drought....where and how bad.. does anyone have have numbers on the shear ytd vs 06 and o5... i seem to remember at one point the shear last june was among the highest recorded
does anyone have have numbers on the shear ytd vs 06 and o5..

Yep - here are achived shear graphs (and other stuff) for 2004, 2005 and 2006 and here are the same graphs for this year.
I was looking at National Data Buoy Station 42057 - Western Caribbean and noticed that the water temperature is 81.1 F, is that higher then normal for this time of year or am I worrying for nothing??? With all the rough weather in the heartland and the feast or famine rainfall amounts in Africa...I am very nervous. Like I have said in the past, I lost two homes in Katrina and have started rebuilding...
thanks mst.. i have a ? for all. the ozone warning last year approx this time in south florida... is there a relationship with events such as that and the high shear/dust level last year..
Hey everbody,Looks like we might have our first TYPHOON IN GUAM. I have been seing the GFS models for the past week and it was pointing out a typhoon, and the NOGAPS, UKMET all point TOWARDS DEVELOPMENT and even the SATELLITE SHOWS A LOW PRESSURE ORGANIZING!
is that higher then normal for this time of year or am I worrying for nothing???

Yes, that is higher than normal; on this map, yellows and reds indicate positive anomalies (blues are negative as in the La Nina in the East Pacific):


Click for more
YAY! Here we go again! Oklahoma...land of the twister!

---

urgent - immediate broadcast requested
Tornado Watch number 94
NWS Storm Prediction Center Norman OK
130 PM CDT Fri Mar 30 2007

The NWS Storm Prediction Center has issued a
Tornado Watch for portions of

large part of central and eastern Oklahoma

Effective this Friday afternoon and evening from 130 PM until 800
PM CDT.

Tornadoes... hail to 2 inches in diameter... thunderstorm wind
gusts to 70 mph... and dangerous lightning are possible in these
areas.

The Tornado Watch area is approximately along and 90 statute
miles east and west of a line from 30 miles south of Ardmore
Oklahoma to 35 miles northeast of Chandler Oklahoma. For a
complete depiction of the watch see the associated watch outline
update (wous64 kwns wou4).

Remember... a Tornado Watch means conditions are favorable for
tornadoes and severe thunderstorms in and close to the watch
area. Persons in these areas should be on the lookout for
threatening weather conditions and listen for later statements
and possible warnings.

Other watch information... continue... ww 92... ww 93...

Discussion... developing surface low ncentral TX will track nnewd
across central OK along frontal boundary. Front extends from near
pnc sswwd to near sps. Shear profiles will increase substantially
ahead of low across watch area remainder of afternoon. With air
mass currently uncapped and mdtly unstable supercells expected to
develop across watch. Tornadoes will be possible with any supercell
given the low lfc's and very favorable shear environment.

Aviation... tornadoes and a few severe thunderstorms with hail
surface and aloft to 2 inches. Extreme turbulence and surface
wind gusts to 60 knots. A few cumulonimbi with maximum tops to
550. Mean storm motion vector 22030.


... Hales

;335,0983 360,0980 360,0945 335,0953
Thanks...can't pull up the historical information on the buoy.
Lisa
92W looks better organized on infrared and visible imagery.



I thought there was a tornado in Limon Colorado in 1989 that killed people--guess I was mistaken
Hi everybody,

Look at where the reds are on MichaelSTL's water temperature anomolies map. Note the extreme warmth in the Artic Ocean?
BahaHurricane - Arctic precisely as predicted.

And the Great Experiment continues ...
horricane23 - where is that 92W?
whoops it was in 1990, and 14 were injured in Limon, but none were killed.
Here you go DocBen. Its in the west pacific.

hurricant try this for Ocala Link
Thanks - still southern hemisphere. Makes sense.
92W is actually in the West Pacific at 6.3N, 157.3E; you have to click on the name (92W.INVEST) on the left side (the storm you see on the front page is in the Indian Ocean; by default, storms take precedence over invests and storms in the Atlantic take precedence over those in the East Pacific, then Central Pacific, etc, or from top to bottom).
Hi guys.

MTS Jaya is going to blow up intensification wise
Here are the 12z GFS forecast tracks for 92W (top) and Jaya (bottom):



Waco could get a direct hit by a tornado at about 5:10 pm CDT--latest radar storm velocity shows a strongly rotating supercell thunderstorm bearing down on the city.

Jeff Masters
They need to buckle down and prepare for the worst
That storm looks HUGE - Prayers to one and all and here's hoping they are paying attention if they live there.
That storm is huge in size, but looks to be dying down a bit. According to NEXRAD's storm tracks on this site, there is no tornado with it, and only small hail. Good thing.
First time ive seen you post in your own blog jeff!
He posted on his own blog in April Last year, i think
Thanks Michael - a northern hemisphere invest this early? WOW!

Bad storms again from the same system..a very slow mover.
This tornado vorticy has been around a while. A long lived monster perhaps.
55. Inyo
Hey, it looks like despite La Nina, the area of the East Pacific where hurricanes usually form is still above average. Will La Nina still repress those storms? Also, it looks like the water off of California is quite cold.. I hope this means we will get some fog to help with the fire danger. There's a fire TODAY by the hollywood sign.. fires in March are almost unheard of!
DocBen~ We probibly haven't gone 2 weeks the whole off season without an invest in that area. It's been the year of the never ending invests for that area.
There was a major amount of African dust over the Caribbean around 1980. The sky was occluded for a long period. It was almost like a heavy haze. The only memories are: I do not remember a hurricane @ that time & ther was no
Christmas wind that winter. Seas were calm through Dec. & Jan, with no trade winds.
59. Inyo
that looks like it smells a lot worse than burning chaparral
There is severe flooding in Waco and at least one tornado was actually seen just east the city in Riesel.
Showing at the Orlando, Fl Science Center in the Dr. Phillips CineDome:
Experience the world's largest I/werks domed theater and Digistar II planetarium, with 28,000 watts of digital sound.
Hurricane on the Bayou - Orlando Science Center
It's worse smelling than swamp fire.
THE AREA OF CONVECTION PREVIOUSLY LOCATED NEAR 6.1N 158.1E
IS NOW LOCATED NEAR 6.3N 156.9E, APPROXIMATELY 300 NM EAST OF CHUUK.
RECENT ANIMATED MULTISPECTRAL SATELLITE IMAGERY AND A 302002Z SSMI
IMAGE REVEAL FLARING CONVECTION ON THE NORTHERN QUADRANTS OF A DEV-
ELOPING LOW LEVEL CIRCULATION CENTER EVIDENT IN A 301937Z QUIKSCAT
IMAGE. UPPER LEVEL ANALYSIS INDICATES A FAVORABLE ENVIRONMENT FOR
DEVELOPMENT WITH GOOD POLEWARD OUTFLOW AND LOW TO MODERATE VERTICAL
WIND SHEAR.
74 dBz storm about 35 miles west of San Antonio, TX, moving due east. >4.0 inch hail with it.


Link
Intence cell indeed jake436...

central us in for f5 tornadic event possible 3 or more f5 tornado's occuring in next several hrs as dirual kicks up and the dreaded night storm approaches
san antonio has a nice cell heading its way
New named sytem in the Indian Ocean, Jaya, is currently a tropical storm, but forecast to reach cat. 2. So far it looks headed for Madagascar again, though it has potential to recurve as it gets closer to the island.

What a hectic season for that part of the globe so far . . .
That cell (Hondo duck now) headed toward San Antonio. Is the same one I commented about 3 hrs ago ago being long lived, jeez.
Last March there was a supercell that lasted for over 17 hours, covering 800 miles - both records for the longest duration and distance traveled by a supercell.
Here's damage reports for that local area.
New named sytem in the Indian Ocean, Jaya, is currently a tropical storm, but forecast to reach cat. 2

Jaya is no longer a tropical storm, probably not Cat 2 either:



CIMSS is giving raw (unadjusted) T#s around 6.5, which would be a strong Category 4 storm.
Tropical Depression [1004 hPa] in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.



SST 28-29C, vertical wind shear low to moderate. (10 to 20 knots)
Area of convection near 7.2N 156.0E, or 245 nm east of Chuuk. Imagery indicates that although the overall circulation is broad. convection is beginning to consolidate near 156E just west of Pohnpei. Analysis shows a well-defined convective banding wrapping from the southeast of the storm towards the low level circulation center. The system is in a region of moderate vertical wind shear, but has excellent equatorward outflow and improving poleward outflow due to a deepening upper level low well to its east.

Maximum sustained winds at the center is 18 to 22 knots with a minimum sea level pressure near 1002 mb

The potential of this disturbance to form into a significant tropical cyclone within the next 12 to 24 hours is upgraded to GOOD.
Intersting article here-Ultra computer to detect killer storm.

By Ken Kaye
South Florida Sun-Sentinel
Posted March 31 2007

It can portray a hurricane in stunning detail. It's powered by a supercomputer that can perform 14 trillion calculations a second. And starting in June, it should help tropical meteorologists project whether a storm will arrive as a killer or a creampuff.

The sophisticated new forecast model could be the Holy Grail that forecasters have long sought to sharply improve their hurricane intensity predictions and give emergency managers and residents alike more time to prepare accordingly.

"This is the first time a hurricane model will have its own analysis of the center of the hurricane's structure," said Naomi Surgi of the National Weather Service, who spearheaded the model's development. "This is really pushing the frontiers of science."

Although forecasters at the National Hurricane Center in Miami-Dade County have achieved record accuracy in projecting the path of a storm, they still struggle to gauge its power. South Floridians received an unpleasant reminder of this meteorological soft spot in August when Tropical Storm Ernesto was predicted to plow ashore as a hurricane. After thousands of residents scrambled to put up shutters, the system arrived as nothing more than a squally nuisance.

"Often times, the intensity forecasts can be poor, and that's not because forecasters aren't doing the best they can," said John Gamache, field program manager of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Hurricane Research Division in Miami. "It's just that, to an extent, our understanding of the processes within a storm are kind of limited."

Enter the new model, officially called the Hurricane Weather and Research Forecast system, or "H-werf "for short. It will zero in on the ocean's interaction with a storm as never before and produce an elaborate three-dimensional picture of a hurricane's core, where the most vicious winds lurk.

Hopes are that it will outperform older storm intensity models, said Surgi, hurricane modeling program leader at the weather service's Environmental Modeling Center in Camp Springs, Md.

To function, the model needs to gorge on data: sea surface temperatures, wind conditions and barometric pressures, gleaned by hurricane hunter planes, satellites, buoys and other sensors.

After this banquet of information is ingested, it is sifted, studied and manipulated by NOAA's supercomputer in Gaithersburg, Md., which is capable of absorbing 240 million global weather observations daily and doing 14 trillion data operations in a single second.

To give some perspective, if a human were to undertake 14 trillion calculations at the pace of one per second, the job would be complete in 443,632 years.

The H-werf is sure to be a hot topic at the National Hurricane Conference, which starts Monday in New Orleans and helps meteorologists, emergency managers, government officials and others gear up for the coming storm season.

The model already has proven to be a powerful forecasting tool. While being tested, it accurately predicted that Hurricane Katrina would spin into a Category 5 monster as it marched across the Gulf of Mexico toward New Orleans in August 2005. It did "a really good job" tracking other major hurricanes that summer, including Dennis, Rita and Wilma, Surgi said.

Nevertheless, it will take a few seasons for forecasters to gain confidence in the new model, she said. While it should produce positive results this year, it will require annual adjustments and upgrades before it becomes a truly reliable prophet of a hurricane's development.

"We will see an accelerated rate of improvement over the next five to 10 years," she said.

NOAA, the parent agency of both the weather service and the hurricane center, has made intensity forecasting a top priority because the Atlantic basin is entrenched in a period of heightened activity. That was clearly seen in 2005, the most destructive and active season since records began in 1851.

The fear is that more hyperactive seasons may lie ahead, and that off-target intensity predictions could lead to disaster. Yet, try as they might, forecasters have so far been unable to grasp the complex mechanisms that influence storm strength. As a result, the hurricane center last year erred by an average of 21 mph in predicting the sustained winds of storms three days in advance. That wasn't much better than the average error a decade and a half ago.

The most dreaded scenario for forecasters and emergency managers alike is for a system to rapidly intensify just prior to landfall, as Charley did in August 2004. In five hours, the system's sustained winds surged from 110 to 150 mph, from Category 2 to Category 4, before battering Punta Gorda, Port Charlotte and other Southwest Florida towns.

The reason Charley bulked up so quickly: It crossed over a patch of unusually warm water near the coast and feasted greedily on the thermal energy. Forecasters hadn't expected that. And, in general, they have difficulty foreseeing when a storm will suddenly spin up, said Nick Shay, of the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science.

"Rapid intensification happens in only 10 to 15 percent of the systems," he said. "But those are the ones that give forecasters fits."

In its proposed $3.8 billion budget for next year, NOAA has requested $2 million specifically for hurricane intensity research. It has amassed an arsenal of technological tools to sample the atmosphere around hurricanes, including a high-flying Gulfstream jet equipped with Doppler radar. And it has conducted in-depth post-mortem studies of storms. For instance, during the 2006 storm season, it examined the entire lifecycle of some tropical systems to determine what makes them fluctuate in strength.

But the real optimism for progress lies with the new model, officials said. Although it is "one piece of the puzzle" in the hurricane center's ongoing campaign to improve forecast accuracy, it is a key one, said hurricane specialist James Franklin.

"That is our hope for the future," he said.
NWS GUAM

TROPICAL STORM CONDITIONS POSSIBLE MONDAY OR TUESDAY FOR THE
MARIANA ISLANDS...

A TROPICAL DEPRESSION WEST OF POHNPEI IS EXPECTED TO DEVELOP AND
MOVE NORTHWEST TOWARD THE MARIANA ISLANDS...POSSIBLY BRINGING
TROPICAL STORM CONDITIONS TO THE REGION LATE MONDAY OR TUESDAY.

AT 4 PM LST...THE BROAD CENTER OF THE DISTURBANCE WAS LOCATED NEAR
LATITUDE 7.2 DEGREES NORTH AND LONGITUDE 156.0 DEGREES EAST. THIS IS
ABOUT 150 MILES WEST OF POHNPEI...875 MILES EAST-SOUTHEAST OF GUAM
AND 885 MILES SOUTHEAST OF SAIPAN.

IT IS TOO EARLY YET TO SAY EXACTLY WHERE THIS DEVELOPING DISTURBANCE
WILL GO AND HOW QUICKLY IT WILL INTENSIFY...BUT HEAVY RAIN AND
TROPICAL STORM FORCE WINDS IN EXCESS OF 40 MPH ARE POSSIBLE BY LATE
MONDAY OR TUESDAY AS THE SYSTEM APPROACHES AND PASSES THE MARIANAS.

REVIEW YOUR STORM PREPAREDNESS PLANS NOW AND PREPARE TO TAKE NEEDED
STEPS TO PROTECT LIFE AND PROPERTY IF A WATCH OR WARNING IS ISSUED.
STAY INFORMED ON THIS EARLY SEASON TROPICAL CYCLONE THREAT BY
MONITORING THE LATEST FORECASTS AND STATEMENTS FROM THE NATIONAL
WEATHER SERVICE.
Jaya is no longer a tropical storm, probably not Cat 2 either:

I have to agree, without even looking at any "official" data; that structure is too symetrical and organized for even a cat 2.

Sure hope it recurves and stays out to sea.
On the new computer model:

It gorges on data? But isn't that vital satellite due to fail at any moment, with no replacement even envisioned?

Is this bass-awkward planning, or what?

Sheesh.

Morning, all.
TC Jaya is 85 knots and 955 hPa.

Formation for TD 92W to develop into a TS is GOOD
Rand is going crazy about the severe weather in his blog.
I know...he needs to calm down a little bit
Baha~ Not to mention how many buoys never got replaced after '05.
One supercell thunderstorm produced many of the tornadoes of the day, tracking from northern Oklahoma and southeastern Kansas in the morning, across Missouri during the afternoon and early evening, across Illinois during the mid to late evening, into Indiana during the late evening, before finally losing severe characteristics in Michigan nearly 800 miles (1290 km) and more than 17.5 hours after it first formed. This is the longest path and duration supercell on record. The city of Springfield, Illinois saw a strong tornado track directly through the city from this storm. It also did damage near Sedalia, Columbia, and Mexico, Missouri. The strongest tornado, spawned by a different supercell, was a rare double tornado rated F4, but fortunately it remained in rural countryside.

Eaglesrock and T2, don't you think Rand has the right to be upset. Here he is doing his best to post warnings of severe weather and people are still too stupid to have alert radios especially those living in such storm prone areas then have the nerve to chastize him for their problems....I would be upset too. Stupidity knows no bounds but being alert to weather conditions in your area is a must if you want to live on the Gulf coast, don't ya think???
Just updated we have the first tropical system to develope in the northeren hemisphere....

Forcast at this time to reach category 1 intensity in a few days and threaten the guam area.


Tropical Depression 01W in the northwest Pacific - and it's still MARCH! May become a Typhoon this week.

What is the earliest we have seen a northern hemisphere typhoon/hurricane?
This is nothing out of the norm DocBen. The Western Pacific Typhoon season is year round. You can have storms in any month of the year.