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From Freezing Rain to Giant Hail, Great Plains Endure An Icy Weekend

By: Bob Henson 4:47 PM GMT on January 16, 2017

Freezing rain materialized as expected during the weekend over a large swath of the central U.S., from Texas to Illinois. The ice has been widespread and prolonged, yet the ingredients haven’t come together as they could have for a truly catastrophic ice storm. Temperatures have been borderline--near or just below freezing over large parts of the affected area--and in many cases the ground was still warm enough to help keep surface ice to a minimum. Rainfall wasn’t quite as heavy as feared on the cold side of this storm; ice accumulations have been below 0.5” in most areas. In addition, temperatures crept upward through the weekend across the southern part of the ice belt, which allowed much of the ice to melt in place. Also helping reduce the storm’s impact: winds were mostly on the light side, which reduced damage to ice-coated trees and power lines.

There was still plenty of slipping and sliding for many thousands of central U.S. residents. At least six highway deaths have occurred during the storm, according to a weather.com roundup. Some 10,000 customers reported lost power in Oklahoma, mainly in the state’s northwest half, together with more than 12,000 customers still without power in the Texas Panhandle as of Monday morning. The hardest-hit area extended from the Texas and Oklahoma Panhandles into southwest Kansas, which experienced several rounds of showers and even thunderstorms gliding atop surface air that stayed below freezing. In Dodge City, KS, power was knocked out to hundreds of customers. Embedded at bottom is a photo from Liberal, KS, where photographer Michael Strickland tweeted, “It almost sounds like thunder from all the branches.”


Figure 1. Mary Zinser scrapes a thick layer of ice off her windshield in Arnold, MO, on Friday, Jan. 13, 2017. A thick glaze of ice covered roads from Oklahoma to southern Illinois on Friday amid a winter storm that caused numerous wrecks, forced school cancellations, grounded flights and prompted dire warnings for people to stay home. (David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)

By early Monday, the main upper-level system and surface low had become stacked over Kansas, which pushed a surge of freezing rain further north into southeast Nebraska and most of Iowa. Air temperatures hovered close to freezing, but colder ground temperatures in this area facilitated glazing on untreated and less-traveled highways, streets, and sidewalks. Ice storm warnings remained in effect on Monday morning from southwest Kansas to central Iowa, with rainfall and drizzle expected to decrease from southwest to northeast as the day wears on.

Below are the largest state-by-state ice accumulations for the entire storm as of 8:00 AM CST Monday, as reported by the NOAA/NWS Weather Prediction Center.

Iowa: 0.25”, Knoxville
Illinois: 0.37”, near Maeystown
Kansas: 0.60”, Columbus
Missouri: 0.75”, near Aldrich
Nebraska: 0.30”, Grand Island
Oklahoma: 1.00”, Beaver
Texas: 0.50”, Canadian


Figure 2. Ice hangs from trees along a creek bed in North Tulsa, Saturday Jan. 14, 2017. Image credit: Jessie Wardarski/Tulsa World via AP.

Stormy night of football
One of two big pro-football playoff games--the Pittsburgh Steelers at the Kansas City Chiefs--was moved from Sunday afternoon to Sunday night to avoid the worst of the ice. Temperatures were just above freezing (33°F) by game time in Kansas City, with ice impacts minimal.

A much scarier situation developed with another playoff game--the Green Bay Packers at the Dallas Cowboys--that took place on the warm side of the central U.S. storm. A tornadic thunderstorm approached Arlington, TX, after the Packers-Cowboys game wrapped up on Sunday night. About 1000 people who had yet to leave AT&T Stadium were forced to shelter in place from just after 8:00 pm to 9:40 pm CDT as the storm swept overhead, with a tornado warning for Arlington at one point. Of the two confirmed tornadoes on Sunday, one struck in Grand Prairie, only about 5 miles southeast of the stadium. Severe weather will be on the decrease starting Monday, though a few storms could reach severe levels along and near the Gulf Coast during the week. Meanwhile, the eastern half of the United States and Canada are in for a long stretch of relatively mild weather for January.

Dallas-Fort Worth ended up with 3.16” of rain on Sunday, making it their second-wettest January day on record behind the 3.54” that fell on January 25, 2012. Fittingly for this weekend, one of the most dramatic severe weather reports was ice-related. Hailstones up to 4” in diameter crashed to the ground Sunday evening in Medina, about 40 miles west of San Antonio (see embedded photo below). Only a few storms produce hail this large in the United States during the month of January, according to Patrick Marsh (NOAA/NWS Storm Prediction Center). Hailstones as big as 5” fell in Arkansas on January 21, 1999, and Missouri on January 7, 2008.

We’ll be back with a new post by Tuesday afternoon. Happy Martin Luther King Jr. Day!

Bob Henson








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The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

Reader Comments

Dr. Henson: The link for "as reported by the NOAA/NWS Weather Prediction Center." simply brings us back to this blog (not to the report).
I see climate change.
Quoting 2. daddyjames:

Dr. Henson: The link for "as reported by the NOAA/NWS Weather Prediction Center." simply brings us back to this blog (not to the report).


Fixed--thanks! Here's the link:

Storm Summary Number 11 for Central Plains to Midwest Ice Storm
My guess is this has already been posted, but in case it hasn't:

NEWS | January 13, 2017
Short-lived greenhouse gases cause centuries of sea-level rise
dj - you have mail
thanks for lunch time read nice entry

i am now a twit

find me at

Robert John Ball
@GATEKEEPER013
I thought this day was a day to reflect on the excellence of a gentlemen that focused on pushing for equal rights for all.Not CC/GW as I'm sure that was the last thing on a persons mind while being lynched.
GFS sure has quite the system next week



Quoting 8. washingtonian115:

I thought this day was a day to reflect on the excellence of a gentlemen that focused on pushing for equal rights for all.Not CC/GW as I'm sure that was the last thing on a persons mind while being lynched.

You're right. However, I think what the member was trying to say was it takes courage to stand up. Don't sit in the back of the bus. I do not believe it was intended any other way. But, you are 100% right, this is a day to reflect on civil rights and the injustice that was imposed on human beings just because of their skin color.

Edited because my spelling and typing skills suck. Your, you're, I got it, I got it. I hate when I do that.
Quoting 8. washingtonian115:

I thought this day was a day to reflect on the excellence of a gentlemen that focused on pushing for equal rights for all.Not CC/GW as I'm sure that was the last thing on a persons mind while being lynched.


Hmmm, unless its an analogy of the Fossil Fuel Industry and what it is currently dong to the entire world's population.
Quoting 8. washingtonian115:

I thought this day was a day to reflect on the excellence of a gentlemen that focused on pushing for equal rights for all.Not CC/GW as I'm sure that was the last thing on a persons mind while being lynched.


Actual climate change scientists face persecution for publishing facts. Climate fakers like Watts up find a niche coaxing nonsense from data are lauded as heroic skeptics against the man. Speaking truth to power is what we need to celebrate on a day like MLK day.
Quoting 7. KEEPEROFTHEGATE:

thanks for lunch time read nice entry

i am now a twit




We were already well aware of that ;)
No disrespect intended.

I have a dream!

This is a nightmare.
From the previous blog @438. vanderwaalselectrics:
... In the Lindzen 'iris' paper and in then WARMER papers Hartman/Fu and really ALL GCMs they use grid squares to look at out going long wave radiation. The tropics are all the subject for these studies and in particular the Pacific. However electrical currents will move in narrow channels (think wires) that are much much smaller than the grid squares. So this complexity, if true, would mean that these studies by top climatologists (who all lack any significant training in electromagnetism and/or its implication to cloud microphysics) are essentially meaningless.

The reason the ACOGCMs and satellite measurements feature IR emissions at the Top of the Atmosphere (TOA) is that infrared emissions are the mode by which energy leaves the planet, for all practical purposes. Your suggestion that there is an alternate, electrical/magnetic mechanism would seem to be difficult to prove. Measurements of the incoming solar and outgoing IR energy flows are in close agreement without any mention of your suggested mode. Perhaps you could provide some evidence of this mode before it could be considered further.

IMHO, Lindzen's "Adaptive Iris" mode, which suggests a net negative feedback in the climate system, fails to explain the recurrent Ice Ages, as these imply a net positive feedback which amplifies the relatively small variation in solar forcing due to Milankovitch orbital variations...
Quoting 13. daddyjames:



We were already well aware of that ;)

You fell right into that one Keeper.
12z Euro Agrees

Quoting 6. LAbonbon:

dj - you have mail


Replied
Thanks for the new icy blog! Those are some impressive photos. You rarely get ice storms that bad in Germany, fortunately.

Some more news from the cold (notice, this new crack is not the one of the Larsen-C shelf which made it to the news earlier; it's a different location):
Ice crack to put UK Antarctic base in shut-down
BBC, By Jonathan Amos BBC Science Correspondent, 2 hours ago
The British Antarctic Survey is to pull all staff out of its space-age Halley base in March for safety reasons.
The highly unusual move is necessary because the Brunt Ice Shelf on which the research station sits has developed a big new crack.
BAS officials say neither staff nor the base are in any immediate danger but believe it would be prudent to withdraw while the situation is assessed. ...

More details and photos see link above.

Only another month or so of growth... yikes



Quoting 21. VAbeachhurricanes:

Only another month or so of growth... yikes






If you bet the under this year, your in the $$$


If smiling: I am interpreting it as smugness directed towards earth.

If frowning (washingaway): disapproval directed towards earth.
Quoting 18. daddyjames:

Venus Smiled, With a Mysterious Wave Across Its Atmosphere

From the article, "For a few days, Venus smiled - sideways." Maybe Venus was frowning sideways. How can one tell?
Quoting 24. washingaway:


From the article, "For a few days, Venus smiled - sideways." Maybe Venus was frowning sideways. How can one tell?


Glass half full, buddy!

Extensive tule fog in the San Joaquin Valley with strong inversion, milder air aloft. Sierra snowcap visible, soon to be added to with incoming series of storms starting about Wednesday

Did a trace of the mesocyclone on last nights Dallas supercell. I Barely got out of work before it came through.
Quoting 24. washingaway:


From the article, "For a few days, Venus smiled - sideways." Maybe Venus was frowning sideways. How can one tell?


I dunno. I'm no astronomy expert, but I don't think that's Venus' face, I think she just mooned us.
Meteo Europe started a live report of Mediterranean low "Finjas" (I'm glad it got dubbed with such a quite uncommon name - more north it's common though - as it is way easier to find news about the storm):

Live ticker low Finjas S and SE Europe and expected arctic blast towards Iberian Peninsula
Very interesting determined runs of Arpege indicate locally over 3,75 meter [12 feet!) of snow until Friday 20-01 for parts of Abruzzo in Italy, but also impressive amounts of snow for C Greece.

More details and pics with loads of snow from regions so far more south than my snowless part of Germany see link above.


Accumulated rain until Thursday.


Accumulated snow. - There is already a big amount of snow on the ground in certain regions like central Italy. The old mother of my Italian hairdresser lives in one of those little villages high above in the mountains, and we lately talked about the masses of snow over there. :-)

237 mph jet max, powered by an influx of energy from two decaying tropical systems in the western Pacific.
Quoting 25. daddyjames:



Glass half full, buddy!


It's half empty, pal!
Quoting 29. BayFog:


Gravity wave?

Yes - a stationary gravity wave. Until they zoomed out a little more and saw this:

Quoting 23. daddyjames:



If smiling: I am interpreting it as smugness directed towards earth.

If frowning (washingaway): disapproval directed towards earth.


Actually, Venus simply ignored us. The wave was located pretty much on the opposite side of Venus than Earth. Here, Sun in yellow, Earth in blue, Venus in orange, and the direction into which the wave "pointed", in pink. North is pointed towards viewer.



Why should Venus acknowledge us? Even though we are trying hard to imitate its atmospheric composition, the efforts are futile.
Quoting 34. elioe:



Actually, Venus simply ignored us. The wave was located pretty much on the opposite side of Venus than Earth. Here, Sun in yellow, Earth in blue, Venus in orange, and the direction into which the wave "pointed", in pink. North is pointed towards viewer.



Why should Venus acknowledge us? Even though we are trying hard to imitate its atmospheric composition, the efforts are futile.


She was just being polite. Did not want to laugh in our face, so to speak. ;)
We have plenty of water, the canteen is half full. Or,
We're running low on water, the canteen is half empty.
Perspective is everything, especially if you're in a desert with a half empty canteen.
After this, enough of Paint for this day.

Quoting 28. KingofNewOrleans:



I dunno. I'm no astronomy expert, but I don't think that's Venus' face, I think she just mooned us.


Not sure. Since Venus doesn't have a moon, would she know what that means?
Quoting 34. elioe:

Actually, Venus simply ignored us. ...

Actually, Venus simply can't see us anymore, thanks to air pollution ;-) The latest (Guardian):

Oslo temporarily bans diesel cars to combat pollution
Monday 16 January 2017 14.38 GMT

Paris vehicle pollution sticker scheme comes into force
Monday 16 January 2017 15.52 GMT

In Tanzania too:
Coral reefs off Tanzania's coast are being destroyed, most beyond repair
The Conversation - January 15, 2017.
Quoting 11. daddyjames:



Hmmm, unless its an analogy of the Fossil Fuel Industry and what it is currently dong to the entire world's population.


Hmm, seems as if its not that much of an analogy.

While Oil Front Group Touts Cheap Fossil Fuel to Low-Income Families, Industry Negotiates Deal to Drive World Oil Prices Up
"Giant Middle East dust storm caused by a changing climate, not human conflict"
Link
From the previous blog. meant to post this here:

Quoting 432. 999Ai2016:


A good read, indeed. Your local newspaper... ADN? I hope not, their coverage of climate issues is rather good. See also this article:
Yukon's climate, notoriously cold in Gold Rush days, is transforming

(...) Significant changes in the Yukon have already been measured.
Average temperatures in the territory have increased by 2 degrees Celsius (about 3.5 degrees Fahrenheit) over the last 50 years, and by 4 degrees Celsius (just over 7 degrees Fahrenheit) in winter, according to Environment Yukon, the territorial government's environmental agency. Yukon glaciers have lost nearly a quarter of their surface area since 1958, and glacial melt is causing water shortages in some places -- including the total disappearance of one river this summer -- and flooding in others, according to Environment Yukon. (...)
ADN - September 2016. Link


Yeah, ADN is going pay... We got notified by the editor. John Oliver did a piece on how important newspapers are, but how they are slowly being killed off. TV News rarely does investigative reporting on their own, but they sure quote and use newspapers that do.

This year so far it has snowed MORE than the past entire two winters combined. I have 3 foot of snow built up in the yard. Last year the snow never "built up" in between the lackluster amount of snow storms we got. While this is still a low to low average year for snowfall (according to ADN - I have no idea personally), at least it's something better than the past two winters.

Ohh and I would rather have snow than ice. I feel for those fighting the ice storms.
Quoting 38. daddyjames:



Not sure. Since Venus doesn't have a moon, would she know what that means?


Well, she may not call it "mooning" (which according to the OED has only been in use since the 60s), the concept has been around for millennium and across many cultures. The Maori call it Whakapohane (thanks wikipedia). Whatever Venus may call it, the intent behind it seems to universal.

It could get worse. If a certain President-elect finds out about this, retaliation is inevitable.
It's a beautiful day here on the Redwood Coast! At least from where I sit on my porch in the sun and blocked by the wind. I've had frost for the last few mornings, but the days have been glorious. So nice to have good weather over the weekend, and a holiday weekend to boot. So, we're drying out a little before the next round. It looks like it will start raining again on Wednesday and rain every day for a week or more. Another atmospheric river taking aim at us.

It seems like a good old-fashioned normal winter to me. We used to get a lot more "Seattle Sunshine" (i.e., drizzle) and it was cloudy and damp all winter. It certainly makes you appreciate days like today when you can sit out in the warm sunshine.
Seems as if regulations really do have an economic impact:

The estimated annual benefits of major Federal regulations reviewed by OMB
from October 1, 2005, to September 30, 2015,4 for which agencies estimated and
monetized both benefits and costs, are in the aggregate between $208 billion and
$672 billion, while the estimated annual costs are in the aggregate between $57
billion and $85 billion, reported in 2001 dollars. In 2014 dollars, aggregate
annual benefits are estimated to be between $269 and $872 billion and costs
between $74 and $110 billion. These ranges reflect uncertainty in the benefits
and costs of each rule at the time that it was evaluated.

The estimated annual net benefits, benefits net of costs, of major Federal
regulations reviewed by OMB from January 21, 2009, to September 30, 2015
(this Administration), for which agencies estimated and monetized both benefits
and costs, is between approximately $103 and $393 billion (2001$).



Draft 2016 Report to Congress on the Benefits and Costs of Federal Regulations and Agency Compliance with the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (opens a pdf).
Quoting 41. daddyjames:



Hmm, seems as if its not that much of an analogy.

While Oil Front Group Touts Cheap Fossil Fuel to Low-Income Families, Industry Negotiates Deal to Drive World Oil Prices Up


While I certainly haven't made sure this is a complete list - in the past couple of months, Alaska has had two HUGE oil finds, along with Texas. Internationally, Guyana just announced a large oil find. It's going to take the world controlling itself to manipulate oil prices. In the meantime, demand is slowing, but the economies that rely on oil to survive are struggling, so the temptation to pump more is there.

It will be interesting to see how this play out. In addition, we are going to see more and more high efficiency vehicles come on the market, including battery only electrics. Which is a start.
Quoting 47. Dakster:



While I certainly haven't made sure this is a complete list - in the past couple of months, Alaska has had two HUGE oil finds, along with Texas. Internationally, Guyana just announced a large oil find. It's going to take the world controlling itself to manipulate oil prices. In the meantime, demand is slowing, but the economies that rely on oil to survive are struggling, so the temptation to pump more is there.

It will be interesting to see how this play out. In addition, we are going to see more and more high efficiency vehicles come on the market, including battery only electrics. Which is a start.


What is ironic is that private industry pressures the nation states (OPEC) to cut production to drive up prices. Yet, when prices increase, the wells in the US are reactivated, ramping up production, and driving the prices back down.
Oxfam International just released their report. In a nutshell, economic inequality continues to grow:

An economy for the 99%

Edit: In case you were wondering why this is relevant:

THE FALSE ASSUMPTIONS DRIVING THE ECONOMY OF THE 1%

1. False assumption #1: The market is always right, and the role of governments should be minimized.
2. False assumption #2: Corporations need to maximize profits and returns to shareholders at all costs.
3. False assumption #3: Extreme individual wealth is benign and a sign of success, and inequality is not relevant.
4. False assumption #4: GDP growth should be the primary goal of policy making.
5. False assumption #5: Our economic model is gender-neutral.
6. False assumption #6: Our planet's resources are limitless.
Quoting 15. EricGreen:

From the previous blog @438. vanderwaalselectrics:
... In the Lindzen 'iris' paper and in then WARMER papers Hartman/Fu and really ALL GCMs they use grid squares to look at out going long wave radiation. The tropics are all the subject for these studies and in particular the Pacific. However electrical currents will move in narrow channels (think wires) that are much much smaller than the grid squares. So this complexity, if true, would mean that these studies by top climatologists (who all lack any significant training in electromagnetism and/or its implication to cloud microphysics) are essentially meaningless.

The reason the ACOGCMs and satellite measurements feature IR emissions at the Top of the Atmosphere (TOA) is that infrared emissions are the mode by which energy leaves the planet, for all practical purposes. Your suggestion that there is an alternate, electrical/magnetic mechanism would seem to be difficult to prove. Measurements of the incoming solar and outgoing IR energy flows are in close agreement without any mention of your suggested mode. Perhaps you could provide some evidence of this mode before it could be considered further.

IMHO, Lindzen's "Adaptive Iris" mode, which suggests a net negative feedback in the climate system, fails to explain the recurrent Ice Ages, as these imply a net positive feedback which amplifies the relatively small variation in solar forcing due to Milankovitch orbital variations...


Hi Eric!
Before I reply, I have to tell you as a son of a meteorologist, I LOVE talking about weather and climate. My father passed away it's been about 3 years ago from the big C and I really miss our conversations. For many this kind of discussion is dull. But for me it's of endless fascination and of the heart.
I have actually spoken personally to Lindzen about electrics over the phone. He's got a thick English accent and he spoke bitterly of the 'alarmists'. Of course, he assumed that since I was not a green house gas warmer that I was not an alarmist. BUT I AM an 'alarmist'. LOL.
I think in fairness to Richard Lindzen, despite the fact that he holds political views, his paper's QUESTION does the earth have an adaptive iris is right on point and CORRECT and the paper gets to the flaws in the green house gas theory. The earth DOES have an adaptive infra red iris. The devil is exactly how life does it and it's certainly not as a green house gas. The idea that gaia's dampening was by a green house gas was summarily and quickly dismissed in the 80s because it's TOO SLOW. The feedbacks have to be much faster to put selective pressure back on life.
But anyway as a starting point in fairness again to Lindzen it's probably good to put up a link to the paper itself: http://www-eaps.mit.edu/faculty/lindzen/adinfriris .pdf Link Starting on page 422 he describes a 1 degree by 1 degree grid. The area studied is in the western tropical Pacific. What I am saying is not all 1 by 1 degree grid spaces are created equally due to an electrical complexity. Indeed when you have a La Nina it's associated with lower shear in the Atlantic, twisters in the alley. These are teleconnections a great distance from what is studied. It's not just outgoing radiation that is a measure of energy as well, even if it's the best we can do observationally. There is also kinetic expressions of energy. My concern is that non linear transfers of electrical energies and cloud behaviors bring super storms to the non tropics, and civilization will end as we know it. Also, the modulations by rivers and near shore oceans are not in this study, and the dampening electrical behaviors are key in my view in this regard because 90 percent of lightning occurs over land, and near shore oceans and their near shore electrical characteristics are in the pathway to the tropics lindzen studied and there in the way of the electrical energy requiring tropical storms there, where the lightning over land powers this complexity of cloud behaviors. Imagine for instance how the conditions electrically along the near shore of California have changed with the fresh water capping that the recent storm drainage along the coast does in comparison to the saltier warmer oceans that were there before the storms, and then what upwelling of nutrient rich waters means for microbial life and what feedbacks then occur as far as near shore carbonation and then what the conductivities are at then in a couple of weeks . . .
Snow... Snow everywhere (NOAA/NESDIS - data for January 15):

Ice age is coming :-p

Edit : click to enlarge.
Quoting 48. daddyjames:



What is ironic is that private industry pressures the nation states (OPEC) to cut production to drive up prices. Yet, when prices increase, the wells in the US are reactivated, ramping up production, and driving the prices back down.


The dog is chasing its tail on this one.
Quoting 15. EricGreen:

From the previous blog @438. vanderwaalselectrics:
... In the Lindzen 'iris' paper and in then WARMER papers Hartman/Fu and really ALL GCMs they use grid squares to look at out going long wave radiation. The tropics are all the subject for these studies and in particular the Pacific. However electrical currents will move in narrow channels (think wires) that are much much smaller than the grid squares. So this complexity, if true, would mean that these studies by top climatologists (who all lack any significant training in electromagnetism and/or its implication to cloud microphysics) are essentially meaningless.

The reason the ACOGCMs and satellite measurements feature IR emissions at the Top of the Atmosphere (TOA) is that infrared emissions are the mode by which energy leaves the planet, for all practical purposes. Your suggestion that there is an alternate, electrical/magnetic mechanism would seem to be difficult to prove. Measurements of the incoming solar and outgoing IR energy flows are in close agreement without any mention of your suggested mode. Perhaps you could provide some evidence of this mode before it could be considered further.

IMHO, Lindzen's "Adaptive Iris" mode, which suggests a net negative feedback in the climate system, fails to explain the recurrent Ice Ages, as these imply a net positive feedback which amplifies the relatively small variation in solar forcing due to Milankovitch orbital variations...


Forget it. He's a monomaniacal troll. The premise he builds his ludicrous hypothesis on goes against fundamental physics and basic observations. You'll get a wall of rambling text and pseudo-scientific nonsense, but nothing in the way of a working model, let alone one that makes any sense.
Quoting 29. BayFog:


Gravity wave?


The effect is similar to what you can see in a shallow river or creek that has rocks relatively close to the surface of the water. If the water is moving slow enough, you don't a see a disturbance. But water moving at fast enough speed will generate a surface wave very similar to what is seen in the imagery.

In fact, the imagery itself shows a large topological feature where the wave emanates from, acting for all intents and purposes like a rock just beneath the surface of a river.
Quoting 51. 999Ai2016:

Snow... Snow everywhere (NOAA/NESDIS - data for January 15):

Ice age is coming :-p

I don't know...I'm SE of the Great Salt Lake, and our snow cover on the 15th was pretty much gone.
Quoting 53. Xyrus2000:



Forget it. He's a monomaniacal troll. The premise he builds his ludicrous hypothesis on goes against fundamental physics and basic observations. You'll get a wall of rambling text and pseudo-scientific nonsense, but nothing in the way of a working model, let alone one that makes any sense.


Most green house gas warmers project pretty much what you just said.

Did you know that tropical storms are strongly correlated with inner core heavy lightning when they rapidly intensify?

What do you think an alternating field from that constant lightning (Schuman resonances) does to CO2 that has been dissolved in the forming clouds that become heat trapping cirrus? Tell me since you seem to know what is good 'science' and what is not whether these ions dissolved in the cloud droplets will stay stationary or flip polarity. If you say flip, depending on the field strength, what will that movement mean as far as how the van der waals forces between water molecules is able to crystalize the ice? Mmmmmmmm? Tell me. Tell me your physics you would use. I really want to hear it. Explain how the freeze rate would be uniform under those conditions. THEN if not how would electrical patterns inside a storm occur due to the dielectrical characteristic of water? People who don't agree with YOU are trolls. How convenient for you. You don't have to put a thought together. Just label someone you don't agree with troll and there you go. It's a very simple way of seeing the world and people in it.
It could get interesting around here in Soo Cal

Hydrologic Outlook
HYDROLOGIC OUTLOOK
CAZ043-048-050-055>058-060>062-065-552-554-180730 -

HYDROLOGIC OUTLOOK
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SAN DIEGO CA
1125 AM PST Mon Jan 16 2017

...SERIES OF PACIFIC STORMS TO IMPACT CALIFORNIA THURSDAY THROUGH
NEXT TUESDAY...

CONFIDENCE IS BUILDING FOR A SIGNIFICANT WET PERIOD ACROSS FAR
SOUTHWEST CALIFORNIA BEGINNING THURSDAY JANUARY 19TH...AND
CONTINUING THROUGH TUESDAY JANUARY 24TH. UNLIKE THE LAST Series
OF STORMS...THE STORM TRACK LATER THIS WEEK WILL BE SUPPRESSED
FAR ENOUGH SOUTH ACROSS THE PACIFIC TO INCLUDE FAR SOUTHWESTERN
CALIFORNIA IN PERIODS OF MODERATE TO BRIEFLY HEAVY PRECIPITATION.
LITTLE RECOVERY TIME IS EXPECTED BETWEEN SYSTEMS.

THIS WILL BE THE FIRST TIME SINCE 2010 THE DEVELOPING WEATHER
PATTERN WILL HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO CREATE AN EXTENDED PERIOD OF
ENHANCED RUNOFF INTO AREA STREAMS AND MAIN-STEM RIVERS. IN
ADDITION...AFTER THE FIRST AND SECOND STORMS...THE SOILS WILL
LIKELY HAVE LITTLE CAPACITY TO ABSORB MUCH MORE RAIN...WITH MOST
OF IT BECOMING RUNOFF.

THERE WILL BE THE POSSIBILITY OF FLASH FLOODING...ESPECIALLY WITH
THE STRONGER SYSTEMS THIS WEEKENDAND EARLY NEXT WEEK...DUE TO THE
POTENTIAL FOR HEAVIER RAINFALL RATES. THE GREATEST THREAT WILL
EXIST IN AND BELOW RECENT BURN SCARS AND IN POORLY DRAINED URBAN
AREAS.

Some very preliminary 6-DAY forecast rainfall totals for Thursday
through Tuesday of next week...

Coast...........2 to 4 inches.
Valleys.........3 to 5 inches.
Mountains.......5 to 10 inches.
Upper deserts...1 to 3 inches.
Lower deserts...1 to 2 inchES.

SOME FAVORED COASTAL SLOPES COULD RECEIVE A FOOT OR MORE OF RAIN.
SNOW LEVELS WILL FLUCTUATE MOSTLY BETWEEN 4500 AND 5500 FEET...
WHICH WILL HELP TO MITIGATE RUNOFF FROM THE UPPER MOUNTAIN SLOPES
INITIALLY. HOWEVER...THERE ARE INDICATIONS THE FREEZING LEVELS MAY
RISE FOR A TIME DURING THE FINAL STORM IN THIS SERIES. THIS COULD
AUGMENT RUNOFF. SEVERAL FEET OF SNOWFALL IS POSSIBLE IN THE HIGHER
MOUNTAIN COMMUNITIES BY NEXT TUESDAY.

SEVERAL OF OUR RIVER SYSTEMS HAVE NOT RECORDED SIGNIFICANT FLOW
SINCE 2010 INCLUDING THE SAN LUIS REY...SANTA MARGARITA...AND THE
MOJAVE. THE SAN DIEGO RIVER RESPONDS MORE QUICKLY TO RAINFALL AND
RUNOFF AND WILL LIKELY EXCEED MONITOR LEVEL...FLOWING OVER SOME OF
THE LOWER WATER CROSSINGS IN MISSION VALLEY AT TIMES.

PRESENT INDICATIONS ARE THAT SOMETIME THIS WEEKEND OR EARLY NEXT
WEEK...THE SANTA MARGARITA...SAN DIEGO...WHITEWATER...MOJAVE...AND
TIJUANA RIVERS MAY RECORD SIGNIFICANT FLOWS.

* THE SAN DIEGO AND SANTA MARGARITA RIVERS MAY REACH FLOOD LEVELS.
THIS WILL IMPACT TRAVEL THROUGH MISSION VALLEY... AND ON
VANDERGRIFT AND STUART MESA ROADS ON CAMP PENDLETON. ROAD
CLOSURES ARE POSSIBLE.

* FOR THE MOJAVE RIVER...PRESENT RAINFALL EXPECTATIONS WOULD NOT
RESULT IN THE RIVER REACHING FLOOD LEVEL. HOWEVER...SIGNIFICANT
FLOWS IN THE HIGH DESERT ARE RARE AND MAY IMPACT LOW WATER
CROSSINGS AND AGRICULTURAL INTERESTS IN AND NEAR THE RIVER
CHANNEL.

* THE WHITEWATER RIVER DRAINS INTO THE COACHELLA CANAL WHICH FLOWS
THROUGH HEAVILY POPULATED AREAS IN THE COACHELLA VALLEY. LOW-
WATER CROSSINGS MAY BE INUNDATED AND BARRICADED AT TIMES IF THE
FLOW BECOMES MODERATE TO HEAVY.

* THE TIJUANA RIVER TENDS TO RESPOND QUICKLY TO HEAVY RAINFALL
RATES...ESPECIALLY WHEN THE SOIL HAS BECOME SATURATED. RESIDENTS
AND INTERESTS IN THE TIJUANA RIVER VALLEY SHOULD BE PREPARED FOR
FLOODING AT TIMES THIS COMING WEEKEND AND MAKE PREPARATIONS TO
MOVE EQUIPMENT AND ANIMALS TO HIGHER GROUND IF NECESSARY.

* FLOWS ARE POSSIBLE IN THE SAN LUIS REY RIVER EARLY NEXT WEEK.
AFTER YEARS OF VERY LITTLE FLOW...DENSE OVERGROWTH HAS DEVELOPED
IN THE CHANNEL. ANY SIGNIFICANT FLOW CAN RESULT IN FLOODING DUE
TO TEMPORARY CHANNEL BLOCKAGES THAT MAY DEVELOP. LOCAL FLOODING
IS POSSIBLE IN UPSTREAM AREAS FROM BONSALL TO PAUMA VALLEY. SOME
ROAD IMPACTS OR CLOSURES ARE POSSIBLE... INCLUDING SHEARER
CROSSING...COUSER CANYON AND LILAC ROAD.

A PRELIMINARY FORECAST FROM THE CALIFORNIA-NEVADA RIVER FORECAST
CENTER HAS THE SAN DIEGO RIVER REACHING 7.5 FT BY 6 PM PST FRIDAY.
THIS MAY CAUSE SOME CLOSURES OF LOW-WATER CROSSINGS IN MISSION
VALLEY THEN. WATCH FOR LAXRVSSGX ISSUANCES FOR RIVER FORECAST
LEVELS IN THE COMING DAYS...OR CHECK THE WEB AT:
WATER.WEATHER.GOV/AHPS2/INDEX.PHP?WFO=SGX

SOME FLOODING IS LIKELY LATER THIS WEEK. EXPECT ROAD CLOSURES OR
DELAYS AT LOW-WATER CROSSINGS AND URBAN FLOODING AT TIMES OF
HEAVY RAINFALL RATES. WATCH FOR UPDATES AND POSSIBLE WATCHES AND
WARNINGS AT WEATHER.GOV/SANDIEGO AS WE GET CLOSER TO THE EVENT.


$$

JAD
Quoting 46. daddyjames:

Seems as if regulations really do have an economic impact:

The estimated annual benefits of major Federal regulations reviewed by OMB
from October 1, 2005, to September 30, 2015,4 for which agencies estimated and
monetized both benefits and costs, are in the aggregate between $208 billion and
$672 billion, while the estimated annual costs are in the aggregate between $57
billion and $85 billion, reported in 2001 dollars. In 2014 dollars, aggregate
annual benefits are estimated to be between $269 and $872 billion and costs
between $74 and $110 billion. These ranges reflect uncertainty in the benefits
and costs of each rule at the time that it was evaluated.

The estimated annual net benefits, benefits net of costs, of major Federal
regulations reviewed by OMB from January 21, 2009, to September 30, 2015
(this Administration), for which agencies estimated and monetized both benefits
and costs, is between approximately $103 and $393 billion (2001$).



Draft 2016 Report to Congress on the Benefits and Costs of Federal Regulations and Agency Compliance with the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (opens a pdf).

How does the second half of the report's title fit in? "...and Agency Compliance with the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act". Does the report include the actual costs of agencies meeting unfunded mandates?

Edit/add-on: yeah, I did look at the report...but honestly, that thing could cure my insomnia...Zzzzzz...
Freezing rain warning in effect for:
City of Toronto
Ice build-up due to freezing rain is expected or occurring.

Freezing rain will begin this evening in Southwestern Ontario, reaching Toronto overnight and continue to spread eastward Tuesday morning.

Freezing rain will change to rain on Tuesday morning in portions of Southwestern Ontario and Tuesday afternoon for areas near Western Lake Ontario. Freezing rain accretion of 2 to 5 mm is possible on untreated surfaces. Higher amounts are possible in the Dundalk Highlands, where freezing rain is expected to persist into Tuesday evening.

For regions east towards Peterborough, freezing rain could last into Tuesday night.
Surfaces such as highways, roads, walkways and parking lots will become icy, slippery and hazardous. Consider postponing non-essential travel until conditions improve. There may be a significant impact on rush hour traffic in urban areas. Beware of branches or electrical wires that could break under the weight of ice. Utility outages may occur.

Please continue to monitor alerts and forecasts issued by Environment Canada. To report severe weather, send an email to ec.cpio-tempetes-ospc-storms.ec@canada.ca or tweet reports to #ONStorm
Quoting 48. daddyjames:



What is ironic is that private industry pressures the nation states (OPEC) to cut production to drive up prices. Yet, when prices increase, the wells in the US are reactivated, ramping up production, and driving the prices back down.


That was the point I was inferring...

For some odd reason this time, I don't see oil prices skyrocketing anytime soon. Despite what some people here in AK are saying. I think it's "wishful thinking" like Argentina, Russia, and Saudi Arabia, OPEC are doing too. Oil companies here may have moved people out of the state, laid off people/fired contract employees, but a skeleton crew is keeping the lights on and the oil wells ready to fire back up as soon as prices go back up....

A friend of mine that co-owns a company that supports oil drillers has said his business is really picking up right now too.
61. vis0
speaking of the Moon...

The last astronaut to ever set foot on the moon has died at 82 || businessinsider.com || (36.5KB)

Remembering Gene Cernan || NASA || (8.6KB?)

and that we may fulfill the hope of peace on Earth.
RIP
False assumption #7
It's totally OK to ignore The Population Bomb.
Catch A Wave and you're sitting on top of the world!

Quoting 19. daddyjames:



Replied

And now I've replied back.

Keep, another mod, or anyone 'in the know' - are we going to get back the 'orange envelope' notices in the task bar? 'Cause those were awfully handy.
Spigot is open for another week and then shuts off after next Tuesday all the way out to 384 hours

Quoting 451. jeanX:

I looked up Lion Gate after seeing image of 414. BaltimoreBrian.

https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/ancient-ar t-civilizations/aegean-art1/mycenaean/v/mycenae-li on-gate

short vid about the age and meaning of Lion Gate, very interesting!
JeanX thank you for sharing the video you found--it was very interesting too :) For those who want to view the video, there are two gaps in the link address in ar t and li on. Wunderground keeps putting gaps in the link when posted. I don't know why.
Quoting 56. vanderwaalselectrics:



Most green house gas warmers project pretty much what you just said.

Did you know that tropical storms are strongly correlated with inner core heavy lightning when they rapidly intensify?

What do you think an alternating field from that constant lightning (Schuman resonances) does to CO2 that has been dissolved in the forming clouds that become heat trapping cirrus? Tell me since you seem to know what is good 'science' and what is not whether these ions dissolved in the cloud droplets will stay stationary or flip polarity. If you say flip, depending on the field strength, what will that movement mean as far as how the van der waals forces between water molecules is able to crystalize the ice? Mmmmmmmm? Tell me. Tell me your physics you would use. I really want to hear it. Explain how the freeze rate would be uniform under those conditions. THEN if not how would electrical patterns inside a storm occur due to the dielectrical characteristic of water? People who don't agree with YOU are trolls. How convenient for you. You don't have to put a thought together. Just label someone you don't agree with troll and there you go. It's a very simple way of seeing the world and people in it.

There is no way this is going to be taken seriously on this site. You might want to consider giving it a rest.
Interconnected fires and waters: Journey to the centre of the earth Mundus Subterraneus (1665) by Athanasius Kircher.





From #34:


Why should Venus acknowledge us? Even though we are trying hard to imitate its atmospheric composition, the efforts are futile.

Only 959,595 parts per million to go.
71. bwi
This next storm seems really weird to me for mid-January on the East Coast. No cold air anywhere around; nothing but rain until it gets to Maine, which then gets an ice storm?



Quoting 70. PaulSweet:

From #34:


Why should Venus acknowledge us? Even though we are trying hard to imitate its atmospheric composition, the efforts are futile.

Only 959,595 parts per million to go.

What does this have to do with Hail, and Ice?
Quoting 73. BaltimoreBrian:



I want one!
Quoting 75. washingaway:


I want one!


My daughter does too...
Quoting 65. HurricaneHunterJoe:

Spigot is open for another week and then shuts off after next Tuesday all the way out to 384 hours




Spigot is on here, it sure hasn't stopped snowing in the past 16 hours... Just extended the winter weather (blizzard would be more appropriate term) until 9pm. Shoveled the driveway 4 times... still snow covered.... This is after the foot that already fell on Saturday.

Not complaining, just explaining. I picked this area to live in and I'll deal with what is thrown my way with a smile.

Glad we are catching up with snowfall totals and that California is also benefiting from the moisture train.
Actual Average Record
Temperature
Mean Temperature 37 F -
Max Temperature 46 F 28 F 42 F (2016)
Min Temperature 28 F 14 F 14 F (2015)

Have I reached senility or is this the new math? Max is 46F and record is 42F
Min Average is 14F and min record is 14F
for Boxford MA
How many men who walked on the moon are still alive? Is there anyone left?
Quoting 67. BaltimoreBrian:

JeanX thank you for sharing the video you found--it was very interesting too :) For those who want to view the video, there are two gaps in the link address in ar t and li on. Wunderground keeps putting gaps in the link when posted. I don't know why.


Thanks for the tip about the extra spaces.
Quoting 70. PaulSweet:

From #34:


Why should Venus acknowledge us? Even though we are trying hard to imitate its atmospheric composition, the efforts are futile.

Only 959,595 parts per million to go.



And we would also have to get rid of our oceans, to be able to have a basically water vapor -free atmosphere.
Quoting 80. BaltimoreBrian:

How many men who walked on the moon are still alive? Is there anyone left?


Michael Collins, I believe is still alive.

Still trying to verify that though.
Quoting 82. elioe:



And we would also have to get rid of our oceans, to be able to have a basically water vapor -free atmosphere.
The stratosphere is very stable and dry--temperature rises with altitude. If we had an extreme greenhouse effect, with surface temperatures above 100°C, there wouldn't be a stratosphere and the upper atmosphere would become moist. Allowing solar UV to dissociate water molecules and let hydrogen escape. A slow process, but very sure. Not something to worry about now.
Quoting 84. BaltimoreBrian:

The stratosphere is very stable and dry--temperature rises with altitude. If we had an extreme greenhouse effect, with surface temperatures above 100°C, there wouldn't be a stratosphere and the upper atmosphere would become moist. Allowing solar UV to dissociate water molecules and let hydrogen escape. A slow process, but very sure. Not something to worry about now.


Yes, such is the case with Venus. On top of which, Venus also lacks a magnetosphere. And yet, it is estimated, that in Venusian conditions, the loss of Earthlike reservoir of water would take between one million and one hundred million years.
Quoting 83. Dakster:



Michael Collins, I believe is still alive.

Still trying to verify that though.
So the last astronaut who walked on the Moon was not the last astronaut alive who had walked on the Moon?
Gene Cernan, last astronaut to walk on the moon, dies at 82

Link
Quoting 83. Dakster:



Michael Collins, I believe is still alive.

Still trying to verify that though.

I believe the closest Michael Collins got to the Moon was in the Apollo 11 Orbiter.
I gave up on winter here in Mobile. It's back to Gulf shores beach tomorrow with a walk on the beach, riding bikes and then to Bubbas for some fresh seafood...
Quoting 83. Dakster:



Michael Collins, I believe is still alive.

Still trying to verify that though.


Collins did not walk on the Moon, he was flying the Command/Service module.
Quoting 71. bwi:

This next storm seems really weird to me for mid-January on the East Coast. No cold air anywhere around; nothing but rain until it gets to Maine, which then gets an ice storm?






It's giving me flashbacks of April 2011 tornado outbreaks...I've seen the forecast hodographs and read the NWS forecast discussion about it here in central NC and they're concerned too. Plenty of shear all the way down to 925mb, a smidgen of CAPE and strong surface warm air advection. Looking like a severe weather event to me. :/ Will likely impact the gulf coast before it reaches me though.
Quoting 90. MahFL:



Collins did not walk on the Moon, he was flying the Command/Service module.


He also became the most isolated known human at the time. Everyone else was either on Earth or the Moon.
Oh I just saw Cernan did in fact die. RIP.
Ok.. I stand corrected, but he sure got closer to the Moon than most of us ever have...
Twelve people have walked on the Moon. Six of them are still living as of January 2017. Wikipedia

Buzz Aldrin, Apollo 11
Alan Bean, Apollo 12
David Scott, Apollo 15
John W. Young, Apollo 16
Charles Duke, Apollo 16
Harrison Schmitt, Apollo 17
The ice accumulation from freezing rain Friday eve onward made a pretty landscape in SW OK Sunday morning.


The ice melted by mid-afternoon.
Sunday morning and evening thunderstorms brought some good rain.
Quoting 95. daddyjames:

Twelve people have walked on the Moon. Six of them are still living as of January 2017. Wikipedia

Buzz Aldrin, Apollo 11
Alan Bean, Apollo 12
David Scott, Apollo 15
John W. Young, Apollo 16
Charles Duke, Apollo 16
Harrison Schmitt, Apollo 17


And to think, of the 12 only one of them Schmitt was a geologist.
Australian conditions favourable for mouse plague, scientists warn

Maybe Australia should import Arabian sand cats. They might do very well--camels have done so well in the outback that they are now a nuisance. Not really--I know that importing animals into different continents can have unintended consequences.
Quoting 5. washingaway:

My guess is this has already been posted, but in case it hasn't:

NEWS | January 13, 2017
Short-lived greenhouse gases cause centuries of sea-level rise

Interesting research.

The last time that CO2 was 400 ppm sea level was over 70 feet higher than it is today. It may be that much sea level rise is already baked in and it's just a matter of how much time it takes to get there. We probably need to get CO2 levels back down below about 320 ppm to avoid lots of SLR but I'm not sure even that would save Tuvalu (mentioned in the NASA page).
Quoting 94. Dakster:

Ok.. I stand corrected, but he sure got closer to the Moon than most of us ever have...

I prefer to sit when I get corrected, at least I'm comfortable.
Quoting 20. barbamz:

Thanks for the new icy blog! Those are some impressive photos. You rarely get ice storms that bad in Germany, fortunately.

Some more news from the cold (notice, this new crack is not the one of the Larsen-C shelf which made it to the news earlier; it's a different location):
Ice crack to put UK Antarctic base in shut-down
BBC, By Jonathan Amos BBC Science Correspondent, 2 hours ago
The British Antarctic Survey is to pull all staff out of its space-age Halley base in March for safety reasons.
The highly unusual move is necessary because the Brunt Ice Shelf on which the research station sits has developed a big new crack.
BAS officials say neither staff nor the base are in any immediate danger but believe it would be prudent to withdraw while the situation is assessed. ...

More details and photos see link above.


I read the abstract for a recent paper on the Larson A and B ice shelves that said the critical temperature for ice shelves is -9 degrees Celsius. If the average yearly temperature is above that then then ice shelf will break up, below that it will sustain. I'm sure it's not quite as simple as that but it may be a good benchmark for finding ice shelves that are in danger of breaking up.

I can't remember where I found the link. It might have been from one of Baltimore Brian's science article posts.
Quoting 100. riverat544:

Interesting research.

The last time that CO2 was 400 ppm sea level was over 70 feet higher than it is today. It may be that much sea level rise is already baked in and it's just a matter of how much time it takes to get there. We probably need to get CO2 levels back down below about 320 ppm to avoid lots of SLR but I'm not sure even that would save Tuvalu (mentioned in the NASA page).

I hope somebody screwed up on the math, otherwise we're screwed.
Quoting 56. vanderwaalselectrics:



Most green house gas warmers project pretty much what you just said.

Did you know that tropical storms are strongly correlated with inner core heavy lightning when they rapidly intensify?
Blah, blah, blah.
Over the past several blogs you've given us a Gish Gallop of different things you think show your electrical world. What you need to do is narrow your focus to one of those things, collect the data, propose a testable hypothesis and test is against the current best science to see if your hypothesis does a better job of projecting the future. If you do something like that we might start taking you more seriously.

10-Day forecast for Indian Hills PWS, almost 3" forecast, gonna need a few more sandbags....
When at war, knowing your adversary's strategy is critical to winning. From the adversary: Winning The Climate Change War: It’s The Economy, Stupid. Know your adversary! Its easy when they openly give you their plan.

About a week ago I suggested that a campaign on pollution and the health risks associated with it might be a better way to gain public support since you can see air and water pollution. The solutions to climate change and pollution are basically the same.

You have mail!

Quoting 77. Dakster:



Spigot is on here, it sure hasn't stopped snowing in the past 16 hours... Just extended the winter weather (blizzard would be more appropriate term) until 9pm. Shoveled the driveway 4 times... still snow covered.... This is after the foot that already fell on Saturday.

Not complaining, just explaining. I picked this area to live in and I'll deal with what is thrown my way with a smile.

Glad we are catching up with snowfall totals and that California is also benefiting from the moisture train.
6
I see I'm late on this. Just trying to get a BB question right for once.
Heard it on the radio today when the news was on.

Quoting 80. BaltimoreBrian:

How many men who walked on the moon are still alive? Is there anyone left?
From the adversary:
"The arguments of the environmental Left, and by proxy the Democratic Party, are esoteric and intangible. The correct argument of the Right should be to unleash the ingenuity of American capitalism in solving the “problem” and highlighting the tangible effects on the wallets of Americans and their families which the Left proposes. As practically every poll indicates, unless you are a climate change alarmist/tree-hugging environmentalist, the economy and, more specifically, the effects on your wallet will win out every time."

A powerful series of storms will move inland from the Pacific late this week through early next week. This will bring multiple rounds of heavy snowfall to the mountains. Five day snowfall for many locations (especially the San Bernardino and Riverside County Mountains) will likely be measured in feet. Significant impacts are expected, including very hazardous travel conditions along mountain roadways. Forecast confidence in a significant event is high, so now is the time for mountain residents to make preparations.


A powerful series of Pacific storms will bring heavy rainfall to SoCal late this week through early next week. Five day rainfall totals will likely be substantial, ranging from several inches at the coast, to as much as a foot along the coastal slopes. A prolonged event of this nature has the potential to produce flows in local rivers not seen since 2010.
From PRI:

Obama is the first US president to author an article in Science magazine


President Obama attempts to shape his legacy in his final days in office.
Credit: Carlos Barria/Reuters


In an eleventh-hour attempt to cement his legacy on climate change and dissuade his successor from scrapping his policies, President Barack Obama published an article in a top academic journal, Science, this week.

Science editors say, according to their records, he is the first sitting US president to author an article in the peer-reviewed journal.

Past high-profile authors in the journal include German Chancellor Angela Merkel, former United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan, former Chinese premier Wen Jiabao and Prince Albert of Monaco.

The article, published Monday, argues that the clean-energy revolution is irreversible and highlights the economic benefits of cutting carbon emissions and investing in renewable energy.

Obama writes that “evidence is mounting that any economic strategy that ignores carbon pollution will impose tremendous costs to the global economy and will result in fewer jobs and less economic growth over the long term.”

Read more here
Quoting 103. washingaway:


I hope somebody screwed up on the math, otherwise we're screwed.

It would probably take more than 500 years to achieve 70 feet of sea level rise. The current projections for 2100 are around 3-6 feet but that could change is there is something like a catastrophic collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet or another ice sheet which could add several feet in a decade or two.

Even if the rise is only 3 feet in 2100 what does that do to Florida and the rest of the Gulf Coast and other low lying areas like Norfolk, VA?
Quoting 102. riverat544:

I read the abstract for a recent paper on the Larson A and B ice shelves that said the critical temperature for ice shelves is -9 degrees Celsius. If the average yearly temperature is above that then then ice shelf will break up, below that it will sustain. I'm sure it's not quite as simple as that but it may be a good benchmark for finding ice shelves that are in danger of breaking up.

I can't remember where I found the link. It might have been from one of Baltimore Brian's science article posts.

There's an article about Ice shelf collapse at the blog 'AntarcticGlaciers' where it says:

"Around Antarctica, ice shelves form where mean annual temperatures are less than -9°C, with sequential break up of ice shelves as temperatures increase[3-5]."

More here
So the weather is a bit wonky here in Metro Detroit this morning. 36 and raining at my house. Drive 29 miles northwest to work, it's 31, freezing rain and my work parking lot looked like a skating rink. Now after being at work for 2 hours it's starting to thunderstorm.

In January.

In Michigan.

Clearly Mother Nature broke into the liquor cabinet.
116. elioe
Quoting 113. riverat544:


It would probably take more than 500 years to achieve 70 feet of sea level rise. The current projections for 2100 are around 3-6 feet but that could change is there is something like a catastrophic collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet or another ice sheet which could add several feet in a decade or two.

Even if the rise is only 3 feet in 2100 what does that do to Florida and the rest of the Gulf Coast and other low lying areas like Norfolk, VA?


One study suggests, that if emissions in carbon equivalent after 2010 AD are 1250 Gt or 2500 Gt, Antarctica will eventually contribute some 14 or 26 meters, respectively. I calculated, that as eventual CO2 concentrations those would mean some 850 ppm and 1300 ppm, if oceans would take a half. But panel B in following image seems to show some 800 and 1100 ppm as peak concentrations.



Another study gives a maximum sea level rise contribution from Antarctica as 17.65 meters by 2500 AD, if CO2 levels rise to 2240 ppm.

In both situations, Greenland would likely contribute a few meters more.
Quoting 115. RunningTrauma:

So the weather is a bit wonky here in Metro Detroit this morning. 36 and raining at my house. Drive 29 miles northwest to work, it's 31, freezing rain and my work parking lot looked like a skating rink. Now after being at work for 2 hours it's starting to thunderstorm.

In January.

In Michigan.

Clearly Mother Nature broke into the liquor cabinet.

NSIDC: Quick Facts on Ice Sheets

"...If the Greenland Ice Sheet melted, scientists estimate that sea level would rise about 6 meters (20 feet). If the Antarctic Ice Sheet melted, sea level would rise by about 60 meters (200 feet)."

Good Morning. Here is the current forecast and look for Conus. In terms of the SE, this current stretch (through this coming Friday in North Florida) of above-average temps every day pushing towards 80 has been truly remarkable for mid-January; it felt like late Spring this past weekend through yesterday.

Quoting 40. 999Ai2016:

In Tanzania too:
Coral reefs off Tanzania's coast are being destroyed, most beyond repair
The Conversation - January 15, 2017.


Half is already dead. Globally.
My 20 years speculation 'all coral dead' appears way too optimistic.
And here are the December Conus temperature averages: Florida leading the pack in terms of above-average temps for December and I suspect that January 2017 will be the same: (cannot get the Chart to post but most of the Southern tier from Arizona to Florida was "much" above average for December). 




Quoting 113. riverat544:


It would probably take more than 500 years to achieve 70 feet of sea level rise. The current projections for 2100 are around 3-6 feet but that could change is there is something like a catastrophic collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet or another ice sheet which could add several feet in a decade or two.

Even if the rise is only 3 feet in 2100 what does that do to Florida and the rest of the Gulf Coast and other low lying areas like Norfolk, VA?


Those estimates are conservative and assume a steady melt loss of ice. Unfortunately there is growing evidence that those assumption may be incorrect.

I can envision several scenarios where rapid sea level rise could occur, and it doesn't take blow torch like temperatures to do it. All you need is a mechanism that moves ice off the land and into the water, and apparently it doesn't take a whole lot to accelerate that process. Break a couple "ice dams" and sea level rise takes a giant leap forward.

These "tipping points" look to happen sooner rather than later. I guess we'll see.
From the hills of south Salem, OR. It has been cold enough the past week that the 1+ inch of snow we had last Tuesday night/Wednesday is still around where it's shaded. My front lawn on the north is still mostly snow covered while the back lawn facing south is snow free where the sun could hit it. All that changes today with some light freezing rain to start out (less then 0.1 inch accumulation) changing to rain after 11 am. High is expected to be 42 and 51 on Wednesday. (Over 50 is shorts, t-shirts and flip flop weather for many here in the northwest but not any more for me at 64. I'll wait until it's in the 60s now.) All the snow will be gone by Wednesday morning. The rest of the week is going to be showery and rainy

In the Cascade Mountains at pass level (around 5000 feet +/- a few hundred) it will also be rain Tuesday and most of Wednesday switching to snow only Wednesday night through the end of the forecast on Monday. I'm guessing 6-10 inches of new snow.

Heavy rains Tuesday night and Wednesday may precipitate some flash flooding from melting snow, especially east of the Cascades where the snowfall over the past couple of week has been measured in feet. I heard up to 8 feet along some roads out toward John Day, OR. As a whitewater rafter I have links to river levels in the state. If it gets crazy I may report back on it in a few days.
Quoting 114. Xandra:


There's an article about Ice shelf collapse at the blog 'AntarcticGlaciers' where it says:

"Around Antarctica, ice shelves form where mean annual temperatures are less than -9°C, with sequential break up of ice shelves as temperatures increase[3-5]."

More here

Thanks, that's exactly what I was looking for.

I found the original article where I read about -9C being a critical temperature. It was a Washington Post article about the big chunk about to break off from the Larsen C ice shelf. In there was this:
Scientists have suggested that there is a kind of threshold in annual temperatures for where ice shelves cease to be feasible: a temperature above minus-9 degrees Celsius (15.8 Fahrenheit), averaged annually. Larsen C turns out to be right at the cutoff for this to happen.
I went looking for something more scholarly and came up empty but your cite fills that need.
Quoting 120. cRRKampen:


Half is already dead. Globally.
My 20 years speculation 'all coral dead' appears way too optimistic.

For those interested in these issues:
- Large parts of Barrier Reef dead in 20 years: scientists
- A changing climate for coral reefs
- The Doomsday Expedition - Part 1
- 'Coral zombies' may spell doom for coral reefs around world
- Coral bleaching 'lifeboat' could be just beneath the surface
The last article contains a link to a very interesting report, may give one a better picture of coral reef ecosystems and associated challenges. The article doesn't mention ocean acidification though, I don't know about the report, but I wonder if this will not sink the lifeboat eventually...
16 days into the new year and here in my neck of the woods, yesterday already marked the 7th time in 16 days where the high temperature soared over 50 F. Average for this time stretch here is 32 F. I have also recorded over 2" of rainfall in that same stretch. So far I have only recorded two separate snowfall events since winter began, each measuring under an 1''. As a snow lover, this saddens me, starting to look highly unlikely to even get another measurable snow. Long range forecasts are holding the cold off until late Feb, which may be our last gasp to grab a snowstorm or two. Next 7 days are forecast to run around 10 C above the norm. Some of my forecasted highs next week will be well over 60 F.

Pacific Northwest is looking mighty colorful.



Short Range Forecast Discussion
NWS Weather Prediction Center College Park MD
235 AM EST Tue Jan 17 2017

Valid 12Z Tue Jan 17 2017 - 12Z Thu Jan 19 2017


excerpts:

...Stormy weather pattern returning to the Pacific Northwest and heavy
rain remains likely for the Gulf Coast...

The weather pattern across the Pacific Northwest will become quite active
starting Tuesday with heavy rain and mountain snow, compliments of strong
onshore flow from the next approaching storm system over the northeast
Pacific Ocean. By Wednesday, this moisture should begin reaching
California and the northern Rockies, with the heaviest rain expected for
the coastal mountain ranges from northern California to Washington.
Strong and gusty winds are also likely near the coast and for the higher
elevations.

EXTENDED FORECAST DISCUSSION
NWS WEATHER PREDICTION CENTER COLLEGE PARK MD
830 AM EST TUE JAN 17 2017

VALID 12Z FRI JAN 20 2017 - 12Z TUE JAN 24 2017


excerpts:

...MORE WET WEATHER SLATED FOR CA, FURTHER RELIEVING DROUGHT
CONDITIONS...
...HEAVY PRECIPITATION EXPECTED FROM THE SOUTHEAST THROUGH THE
MID-ATLANTIC STATES INTO SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND...

WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS/THREATS
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
CONFIDENCE REMAINS ABOVE AVERAGE FOR AT LEAST A COUPLE EPISODES OF
SIGNIFICANT RAIN/HIGH ELEVATION SNOW AND STRONG WINDS ALONG THE
WEST COAST WITH THIS ENHANCED ACTIVITY EXTENDING INTO THE SIERRA
NEVADA RANGE AND SOUTHWEST. CONTINUE TO EXPECT AREAL AVERAGE
AMOUNTS TO LIE IN THE 5-8 INCH AMOUNTS ALONG SOME COASTAL
LOCATIONS AND OVER THE SIERRA NEVADA WITH POTENTIALLY HIGHER
TOTALS ALONG WINDWARD SLOPES. FOR SRN CA/AZ THE HEAVIEST PRECIP
SHOULD OCCUR AROUND FRI-FRI NIGHT AND AGAIN AROUND SUN-MON. MUCH
OF THE REMAINDER OF THE WEST SHOULD SEE LIGHTER PRECIPITATION.
THE UNSETTLED WEATHER WILL TEND TO KEEP TEMPERATURE RANGES MORE
NARROW THAN USUAL WITH BELOW NORMAL HIGHS... ON A LOCALIZED BASIS
BY GREATER THAN 10F... AND NEAR TO ABOVE NORMAL LOWS.

PORTIONS OF THE EAST/MIDWEST WILL SEE SOME RAIN ON FRI FOLLOWED BY
A BRIEFLY DRIER PERIOD. LOCALLY MDT/HVY RNFL MAY DEVELOP NEAR THE
GULF COAST AROUND FRI NIGHT-SAT ALONG A LINGERING FRONT. AS
ENERGY FROM THE INITIAL WEST COAST STORM CROSSES THE
PLAINS/SOUTHEAST... MORE HEAVY RAINS MAY DEVELOP AND SPC IS
MONITORING THE POTENTIAL FOR SEVERE CONVECTION NEAR THE ERN HALF
OF THE GULF COAST DURING THE WEEKEND. CONSULT LATEST SPC PRODUCTS
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION. THE PLAINS TO OH VLY/MID ATLC SYSTEM
WILL SPREAD A BROAD AREA OF PCPN MOSTLY IN THE FORM OF RAIN ACROSS
THE ERN HALF OF THE COUNTRY.
Quoting 126. ILwthrfan:

16 days into the new year and here in my neck of the woods, yesterday already marked the 7th time in 16 days where the high temperature soared over 50 F. Average for this time stretch here is 32 F. I have also recorded over 2" of rainfall in that same stretch. So far I have only recorded two separate snowfall events since winter began, each measuring under an 1''. As a snow lover, this saddens me, starting to look highly unlikely to even get another measurable snow. Long range forecasts are holding the cold off until late Feb, which may be our last gasp to grab a snowstorm or two. Next 7 days are forecast to run around 10 C above the norm. Some of my forecasted highs next week will be well over 60 F.




I've mentioned it many times in the past. When warm air builds into the eastern U.S., we typically see cold air dive down into Alaska and the west.
And when cold air builds down into the eastern U.S., warm air usually builds into Alaska and the west.
It's just how the jet stream usually sets up during the Winter.

As the east coast begins to bake in much above normal temperatures, temperatures will be dropping to 50 below across Alaska. Too bad we can't get this cold air to sit over the north pole.
Special Weather Statement
Special Weather Statement
National Weather Service Fairbanks AK
916 PM AKST Mon Jan 16 2017

AKZ218>226-180300-
Southeastern Brooks Range-Upper Koyukuk Valley-
Yukon Flats and Surrounding Uplands-Central Interior-
Middle Tanana Valley-Deltana and Tanana Flats-
Upper Tanana Valley and the Fortymile Country-Denali-
Eastern Alaska Range-
Including Arctic Village, Wiseman, Coldfoot, Chandalar DOT Camp,
Iniakuk Lake, Allakaket, Hughes, Bettles, Caribou Mountain,
Gobblers Knob, Fort Yukon, Venetie, Central, Circle,
Stevens Village, Beaver, Chalkyitsik, Birch Creek,
Circle Hot Springs, Eagle Summit, Twelvemile Summit, Nenana,
Anderson, Tanana, Minto, Manley Hot Springs, Rampart,
Lake Minchumina, Livengood, Fairbanks, Fort Wainwright,
Eielson AFB, Ester, North Pole, Moose Creek, Two Rivers, Fox,
Chatanika, Chena Hot Springs, Sourdough Camp, Salcha,
Delta Junction, Fort Greely, Harding/Birch Lake, Dry Creek,
Dot Lake, Healy Lake, Tok, Tanacross, Eagle, Tetlin, Northway,
Alcan, Chicken, Boundary, Healy, Denali National Park,
Carlo Creek, Kantishna, Mentasta Lake, Black Rapids,
Donnelly Dome, Trims DOT Camp, Eagle Trail, and Mineral Lake
916 PM AKST Mon Jan 16 2017

...ARCTIC COLD TO SETTLE INTO THE INTERIOR...

Temperatures will fall to around 40 below for much of the interior
over the next 24 hours. Some areas outside Fairbanks may see 55
below before the end of the week.


As the snow ends and skies clear a pool of cold air over the high
Canadian arctic will move southwest into the eastern Interior
Tuesday and settle in across the Interior for the remainder of
the week. Low temperatures in the valleys will fall to 40 to 50
below
with the coldest temperatures expected in the upper Yukon
Flats around Fort Yukon and in the Central Interior around Tanana
where temperatures may fall to around 55 below
. Valley locations
will not see much change as highs will be in the 30s to around 40
below.

Higher elevation areas will not be spared as they will see
temperatures in the 30s below overnight with highs only in the 20s
below.

There will be a slight warming trend for most locations this
weekend, but lows will still be in the 30s below.

For the latest weather forecasts go to www.weather.gov/fairbanks
Quoting 129. Sfloridacat5:

I've mentioned it many times in the past. When warm air builds into the eastern U.S., we typically see cold air dive down into Alaska and the west.
And when cold air builds down into the eastern U.S., warm air usually builds into Alaska and the west.
It's just how the jet stream usually sets up during the Winter.

As the east coast begins to bake in much above normal temperatures, temperatures will be dropping to 50 below across Alaska. Too bad we can't get this cold air to sit over the north pole.

There's not enough cold air for everyone these days :-)

From Climate-Reanalyzer -- today's weather maps:
World: plus 0.44 C (relative to CFSR 1979-2000 baseline).
Yesterday we got that freezing rain. The rain was 35° but the ground was 25°. The rain froze upon impact. The driveway was like a skating rink, with up to an inch of ice. But I lost my camera!
This morning, after finding my camera, I took this shot. By the end of the day, it will be all gone.
Quoting 127. LAbonbon:

Pacific Northwest is looking mighty colorful.





I think the bottom map is precipitation totals for the next 7 days but I have no idea what the colors on the top one mean.
After last nights raping of Veterans benefits, Americans Healthcare, done in the dead of Americans sleep...

Im fairly sure the GOP will start opening the Actual Death Camps, by April.



I'll be railing against this in my Blog.

I cancelled a new AGW project..at this moment.

Semper Fi'


Quoting 133. riverat544:


I think the bottom map is precipitation totals for the next 7 days but I have no idea what the colors on the top one mean.

If you go to the NWS main page, it's the US map, color-coded by weather warnings/watches/advisories, etc.

It means busy busy weather :)

(Edit/add-on: in case anyone needs it, the NWS/WPC's Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts (QPFs) can be found here.
Quoting 135. LAbonbon:


If you go to the NWS main page, it's the US map, color-coded by weather warnings/watches/advisories, etc.

It means busy busy weather :)

(Edit/add-on: in case anyone needs it, the NWS/WPC's Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts (QPFs) can be found here.

Ahh, thanks. Yes we've got freezing rain around Oregon today and rain tomorrow and potential flooding and winter weather advisories in the far east of the state and high winds and surf along the southern coast and even an air stagnation advisory for the John Day area. There is also a hydrologic outlook that warns of rain falling on already snow burdened roofs east of the Cascades increasing the weight even more. I guess we have an interesting couple of days ahead. :)
Quoting 136. riverat544:


Ahh, thanks. Yes we've got freezing rain around Oregon today and rain tomorrow and potential flooding and winter weather advisories in the far east of the state and high winds and surf along the southern coast and even an air stagnation advisory for the John Day area. There is also a hydrologic outlook that warns of rain falling on already snow burdened roofs east of the Cascades increasing the weight even more. I guess we have an interesting couple of days ahead. :)

"...rain falling on already snow burdened roofs" I guess that one would be a "Special Weather Statement"? The last big snow we had here in the central Sierra, spring of 2011, collapled even some second floor decks.
I Have a (Climate) Dream

"I have a dream of clean air and clean water for my daughter and all the children of the world. I have a dream of clean energy jobs for millions of Americans and tens of millions of people around the globe. I have a dream we saved this garden of Eden for generations to come, saved it from the greed and myopia of the 1%."

- Dr. Joe Romm/ThinkProgress Aug 27, 2013
Quoting 134. Patrap:

After last nights raping of Veterans benefits, Americans Healthcare, done in the dead of Americans sleep...

Im fairly sure the GOP will start opening the Actual Death Camps, by April.



I'll be railing against this in my Blog.

I cancelled a new AGW project..at this moment.

Semper Fi'




???
Quoting 139. washingaway:


???


Go to Pat's blog to read about it. He mentions he will be talking about it there
Millions of ocean animals might be malnourished
Anthropocene Magazine - January 17.
Could animals living in the Northern Hemisphere's oceans suffer from a massive, widespread nutrient deficiency, weaking them and threatening the health of entire populations?

(...) When the researchers conducted tests of domestic chickens in whom comparably low thiamine levels were induced, write the researchers, the animals demonstrated "reduced swimming endurance, impaired growth, lowered body condition, reduced reproductive outcome, parasite infestation, and altered blood chemistry and composition."

Chickens can swim? I didn't know that.

(...) "Many health effects, including abnormal behaviour, observed in biota today may well be due to thiamine deficiency," write Hansson's team. To be sure, this hasn't been conclusively demonstrated, but the researchers think attention is urgently required. "Many wildlife populations are declining at rates higher than can be explained by known threats to biodiversity," they write, and "thiamine deficiency has emerged as a possible contributing cause."
Quoting 132. ChiThom:

Yesterday we got that freezing rain. The rain was 35° but the ground was 25°. The rain froze upon impact. The driveway was like a skating rink, with up to an inch of ice. But I lost my camera!
This morning, after finding my camera, I took this shot. By the end of the day, it will be all gone.


Watching the news last night, lots of video of cars sliding and crashing because of the ice on the roads, and I think to myself, wtf is wrong with these people? You can't drive on ice. Does the cold make people stupid? I see this every year.
Quoting 142. washingaway:


Watching the news last night, lots of video of cars sliding and crashing because of the ice on the roads, and I think to myself, wtf is wrong with these people? You can't drive on ice. Does the cold make people stupid? I see this every year.


People's habits make them stupid. Also, desperation makes people stupid. ("I have to get to work or I'll miss my car payment") And disbelief. ("It's not really gonna freeze") And there is nowhere to evacuate to. :/
Quoting 105. PedleyCA:


10-Day forecast for Indian Hills PWS, almost 3" forecast, gonna need a few more sandbags....


Hey Pedley... I've been wondering how to post the ten day forecast like that. Any special tricks? TIA
Quoting 144. ChiThom:



People's habits make them stupid. Also, desperation makes people stupid. ("I have to get to work or I'll miss my car payment") And disbelief. ("It's not really gonna freeze") And there is nowhere to evacuate to. :/

What, re climate change? ;)
It's getting very interesting in the Arctic, on the far north Atlantic side.
Climate Reanalyzer Link
Check out the sea ice, jet stream, surface wind, temperature/temp anomaly, mean sea level pressure and precipitable water...
Quoting 120. cRRKampen:


Half is already dead. Globally.
My 20 years speculation 'all coral dead' appears way too optimistic.


a mass extinction event is under way
been so awhile now but we don't notice it
till it will be too late
nature moves slow but sure
man races like a rabbit
and we miss that
which is occurring
all around us

faster and faster we go
Quoting 110. HurricaneHunterJoe:


A powerful series of storms will move inland from the Pacific late this week through early next week. This will bring multiple rounds of heavy snowfall to the mountains. Five day snowfall for many locations (especially the San Bernardino and Riverside County Mountains) will likely be measured in feet. Significant impacts are expected, including very hazardous travel conditions along mountain roadways. Forecast confidence in a significant event is high, so now is the time for mountain residents to make preparations.


A powerful series of Pacific storms will bring heavy rainfall to SoCal late this week through early next week. Five day rainfall totals will likely be substantial, ranging from several inches at the coast, to as much as a foot along the coastal slopes. A prolonged event of this nature has the potential to produce flows in local rivers not seen since 2010.


California continues to see more much needed drought relief and almost nobody is talking about it! Also, here in the southeast, we've been seeing much needed drought relief, after extremely dry weather of less than an inch from late September through early December, we ended up finishing December at 5.58 and now already 4.32 for January and the long term models show potential for an additional 3-6 inches in this area!

I'm legit worried about the severe potential though, models are showing a rare combination of very cold mid level air from a strong upper system along with impressive jet divergence as well as a very deep surface low and strong vertical shear and even unusually high surface instability in our area. If models don't back off, there could be a moderate risk from the central gulf coast through my area...


image provided by Russian federation services




154. elioe
Quoting 147. 999Ai2016:



Interesting all the way to continental margin at Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Anomalies should reach their maximum soon, more than +24 C in places.

Here is one Arctic warming chart through December 25, 2016 as compared to the climatology between 1981 and 2010; not good and even more impressive, when compared to Antarctica, when you consider that it is Winter in the Northern Hemisphere (in terms of the Arctic averages for the period from October to December 2016).


Figure 4. Arctic temperatures at the 925 hPa level (about 2,500 feet above sea level) over the period January to December of 2016 were above average over nearly the entire Arctic region and especially over the Arctic Ocean. By contrast, air temperatures over the Antarctic region for the same period were above average in some areas, such as the Antarctic Peninsula and near the pole, but below average in others.

Quoting 140. justmehouston:



Go to Pat's blog to read about it. He mentions he will be talking about it there

Apparently he is in the drafting stage.
JeffMasters has created a new entry.

Quoting 126. ILwthrfan:

16 days into the new year and here in my neck of the woods, yesterday already marked the 7th time in 16 days where the high temperature soared over 50 F. Average for this time stretch here is 32 F. I have also recorded over 2" of rainfall in that same stretch. So far I have only recorded two separate snowfall events since winter began, each measuring under an 1''. As a snow lover, this saddens me, starting to look highly unlikely to even get another measurable snow. Long range forecasts are holding the cold off until late Feb, which may be our last gasp to grab a snowstorm or two. Next 7 days are forecast to run around 10 C above the norm. Some of my forecasted highs next week will be well over 60 F.


I feel your pain ILwthrfan. I love the cold and snow too. I don't know where in IL you are, but here in Chicago we did get 16 inches of snow in December from 3 different storms, but there has been no snow since around Christmas. It has all long since melted. Our temperature predictions for this week are nauseating with highs reaching 50. Bring on the snow!! I have been researching various meteorologists who say that the models are hinting at a pattern change to colder and snowier starting around January 24-26. Let's hope they're right. I'm keeping my fingers crossed!
Quoting 145. ChiThom:



Hey Pedley... I've been wondering how to post the ten day forecast like that. Any special tricks? TIA


I used a program called PostImage. Works very well and you can do many things with it.
164. vis0
 
This REPLY To:: to cat6#3542 pg3 comment_129
 
00(USofA use 2 this)

 
01(present Generation Seeing This)

 
02(present Generation And nxt Gen)

 
03(3 Generations down the road might see this)

 
04(See What We Did Here)

 
 
05(???)
 
and two more i left out as one more than 300 years away
 
 
Okay you forced me to show by saying pretty please with a little drizzle (lost 22Lbs since late 2015...going for ~40 or 45Lbs by 2018**) of nacho cheese on top.  Here is the furthest away...
 
 
 
06(last Change "We" Will SEE)

 
 
 
For those saying Great we will then have warmer weather aka beach weather ( taking out the boat...before a strong "warmR core" storm does) in the SE/deep S...remember nature does no do weekends only nature is beezy 25/8 (like mom and dads till kids reach the end of teens ... end of 20s ... 30s ???...both collect SSecurity? )  Now if you think if great warmer weather that means you understand its going to be warmer...why did you forget the bugs, flies, mosquitos (and if the cold does not kill or "control" their advancing (distance and mutations) more odds of mosquitos developing a new strand of disease(s)), fungus, mold, family visiting, lawn mowing
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
 
This REPLY To:: entire pg3 of cat6#3542 as to LAbobon / vanderwaalselectrics blogversation.
one more thing.

i saw a nice blogversation between LAbonbon and vanderwaalselectrics. Not that i fully agreed with either but that it was nice to read counter comments w/o putting down either though if one feels the urge insult me, vis0 i'm use to it.
 
 
As to vanderwaalselectrics point of feedbacks  i agree mainly via my Galacsics theories as to anything above basic physics, i stink.  
 
(Galacsics?? its an area of science i claim i re-discovered late 1960s through 1970s. Dealt with things as "clear matter which i state is 2 times m tan dark matter,  black holes take in light and turn light into forms of deep (-31 Hz) resonance and some (few) are what is used to judge complex beings as they go through the process of reincarnation, Quasar/Nova turn deep resonance into light particularly near Uni-verses edge to maintain the most efficient form of recycling in the universe, explained at what DNA #s and chromosome %#s one can locate signs/signals of  reincarnation, how there are "radon ages" not just ice ages (but at a natural rate), three areas in "near" space where the odds of  complex life is higher than ~80%...including a planet about ~6-8,000 years ahead of humans in Technology, -slao- and some  more weird theories/discoveries ).
 
Tried to share that info and more but no one in the science / media community cared to reply AS TO THE SCIENCE)
 
 Now as to  dampened  systems as to which equilibriums form through modulations creating and feeding off feedbacks this happens (i STATE) in Galacsics too but to me the main problem as to the greenhouse affect is those equilibriums / feedbacks HAVE TO "talk" to basic science.  Since as physical being we are grounded onto the physical plane via basic science THEN all that we experience be it basic or complex has to fill the lower level of science (the basics, if i may use that term) for physical beings to experience.
 
 Therefore even if an unknown future ethereal event would cause earth to coo,  humans are still tilting that event to lean towards a warmer final result and doing so at an alarming rate and if no cooling is coming why take that chance and instead store the info AND OIL of knowing how to warm a planet incase some weird thing cools the planet so fast we need a fast warmup guess what we still have oil to burn and raise CO2 carefully .
 
 In nature there are extremes but they (have to) go through the basic levels of science before a change is made onto the physical plane, with the present level of basic science turning the planet warmer nature will have less cool to pull from on the basic science level so be it just basic science or dampened more complex unknown areas it all has to go through the basic level of physics therefore  beings grounded onto the physical plane (humans) will reap from what is sown.  If its good then good thy humans will feel if it is bad then bad (not the "cool bad" but "not good" bad is what humans will feel.
 
(apology keyboard shorting out cut comment short after a quick go over had 59 typos)
Thanks for that tip Pedley. Here is my weather. Need to know how you use postimage. No matter what I do, it doesn't work... Back to my old way of posting images here.




ARE YOU ******* KIDDING ME...

fpl-wins-battle-to-store-radioactive-waste-under- miamis-drinking-water-aquifer

Really? Where's Indian River Guy? He must be going out of his mind right now.

Quoting 1. Xandra:


If any of you have not yet seen the movie Hidden Figures, I give it 4 & 1/2 of 5 stars. I think it wasn't quite hard hitting enough based on my teenage observations in Birmingham Alabama years 1962 through 1972. The story line held me and the movie has some interesting historical TV news inserted.