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Category 1 Typhoon Haiyan Hitting Vietnam; Extreme Damage in the Philippines

By: Dr. Jeff Masters, 7:09 PM GMT on November 10, 2013

Typhoon Haiyan is closing in on the northern Vietnam coast near the Chinese border as a much-weakened Category 1 storm with 85 mph winds, after devastating the Philippines on Thursday and Friday as an extreme Category 5 storm with top winds of 195 mph. Satellite loops show that Haiyan no longer has a well-defined eye, but the typhoon still has a large area of intense thunderstorms which are bringing heavy rains of up to 1.5 inches per hour to Vietnam and Southeastern China. Haiyan will weaken and dissipate by Monday as it pushes inland over southern China, but the 8+ inches of rain that the storm will dump on Vietnam and Southeastern China will cause major flooding problems.

Haiyan is the third significant storm to hit Vietnam in the past six weeks. According to reliefweb.int, in the first two weeks of October, Central Vietnam was hit by two Category 1 storms, Typhoons Wutip and Nari, leaving behind significant damages in nine provinces. The total economic loss due to Nari was $71 million. Typhoon Wutip's damages were estimated at $663 million. According to EM-DAT, this makes Wutip the second most expensive natural disaster in Vietnamese history, behind the $785 million in damages caused by 2009's Typhoon Ketsana.


Figure 1. MODIS satellite image of Typhoon Haiyan taken at approximately 4:25 UTC November 10, 2013. At the time, Haiyan was a Category 1 storm with top winds of 90 mph. Image credit: NASA.

Extreme damage in the Philippines
With a preliminary death toll of 1,200, Haiyan already ranks as the 8th deadliest typhoon in Philippines history. The deadliest typhoon in Philippines history was Typhoon Thelma of 1991, which killed between 5101 - 8000 people, reports wunderground's weather historian Christopher C. Burt in his latest post on Philippines typhoon history. Haiyan will become the deadest typhoon in Philippines history if the estimates today of 10,000 dead hold up. Bloomberg Industries is estimating insured damages of $2 billion and total economic damages of $14 billion, making Haiyan the most expensive natural disaster in Philippines history. This is the third time in the past 12 months the Philippines have set a new record for their most expensive natural disaster in history. The record was initially set by Typhoon Bopha of December 2012, with $1.7 billion in damage; that record was beaten by the $2.2 billion in damage done by the August 2013 floods on Luzon caused by moisture associated with Typhoon Trami.


Figure 2. A Filipino boy carries bottled water amongst the damaged houses where a ship was washed ashore in Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines on Sunday, Nov. 10, 2013. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

The greatest death toll from Haiyan is likely to be in the capital of Leyte, Tacloban (population 221,000), which received a direct hit from Haiyan's northern eyewall. A stark eyewitness account posted to Facebook of what Tacloban endured, by storm chaser Josh Morgerman of iCyclone.com:

"First off, Tacloban City is devastated. The city is a horrid landscape of smashed buildings and completely defoliated trees, with widespread looting and unclaimed bodies decaying in the open air. The typhoon moved fast and didn't last long--only a few hours--but it struck the city with absolutely terrifying ferocity. At the height of the storm, as the wind rose to a scream, as windows exploded and as our solid-concrete downtown hotel trembled from the impact of flying debris, as pictures blew off the walls and as children became hysterical, a tremendous storm surge swept the entire downtown. Waterfront blocks were reduced to heaps of rubble. In our hotel, trapped first-floor guests smashed the windows of their rooms to keep from drowning and screamed for help, and we had to drop our cameras and pull them out on mattresses and physically carry the elderly and disabled to the second floor. Mark's leg was ripped open by a piece of debris and he'll require surgery. The city has no communication with the outside world. The hospitals are overflowing with the critically injured. The surrounding communities are mowed down. After a bleak night in a hot, pitch-black, trashed hotel, James, Mark, and I managed to get out of the city on a military chopper and get to Cebu via a C-130--sitting next to corpses in body bags. Meteorologically, Super Typhoon HAIYAN was fascinating; from a human-interest standpoint, it was utterly ghastly. It's been difficult to process."


Video 1. Storm chasers James Reynolds, Josh Morgerman and Mark Thomas of iCyclone.com were in the capital of Leyte Province, Tacloban, which received a direct hit from Super Typhoon Haiyan. Video includes the remarkable winds and storm surge of Haiyan, and the rescue of injured people from flood waters.

Extreme damage near the initial landfall location
Rescuers have finally reached the south shore of Samar Island and the city of Guiuan (population 47,000), where Haiyan initially made landfall with winds estimated at 195 mph. Typhoon and hurricane maximum wind speed estimates are only valid for over water exposure, and winds over land are typically reduced by about 15%, due to friction. This would put Haiyan's winds at 165 mph over land areas on the south shore of Guiuan Island. This is equivalent to a high end EF-3 tornado, and damage photos from the town do show tornado-like damage--though much of the worst damage appears to be due to the storm surge. A new Doppler radar that was scheduled to go into operation in 2014 was blown off the tower it was installed on.


Figure 3. Col John Sanchez, Central Command, AFP took these photos from a PAF Nomad aircracft over Guiuan, E. Samar, Sunday morning from 1030H to 1045H: "Guiuan bore the brunt of Super Typhoon Yolanda at its first landfall Friday. One hundred percent of the structures either had their roofs blown away or sustained major damage. Nearly all coconut trees fell. We saw people in the streets, seemingly dazed. Trucks and cars were left in the streets where they were stopped in their tracks as Yolanda struck. We were probably the first outsiders to fly over the area since Friday and obviously, no relief goods have arrived there yet. It was almost lunchtime but there was no smoke from cooking fires. The 2.4 km runway is clear of debris and could still be used by C130 aircraft. Yolanda is probably worse than Pablo and the only reason why we have no reports of casualties up to now is that communications systems in Region 8 are down." Image credit: Col John Sanchez , Central Command, AFP.

Haiyan's place in history
Haiyan hit Guiuan, on the Philippine island of Samar, at 4:40 am local time November 8, 2013 (20:40 UTC November 7.) Three hours before landfall, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) assessed Haiyan’s sustained winds at 195 mph, gusting to 235 mph, making it the 4th strongest tropical cyclone in world history. Satellite loops show that Haiyan weakened only slightly, if at all, in the two hours after JTWC’s advisory, so the super typhoon likely made landfall with winds near 195 mph. The next JTWC intensity estimate, for 00Z UTC November 8, about three hours after landfall, put the top winds at 185 mph. Averaging together these estimates gives a strength of 190 mph an hour after landfall. Thus, Haiyan had winds of 190 - 195 mph at landfall, making it the strongest tropical cyclone on record to make landfall in world history. The previous record was held by the Atlantic's Hurricane Camille of 1969, which made landfall in Mississippi with 190 mph winds.

The Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), which uses their own techniques to estimate typhoon strength via satellite imagery, put Haiyan's peak strength at 125 knots (145 mph), using a 10-minute averaging time for wind speeds. The Philippines weather agency (PAGASA) also uses a 10-minute averaging time for their typhoon wind advisories, and winds estimated by either JMA or PAGASA for Haiyan have appeared in the media, resulting in some confusion about what the typhoon's winds were at landfall. The averaging time used by JTWC and NHC is 1-minute, resulting in a higher wind estimate. To convert from 10-minute averaged winds to 1-minute average, one conversion factor that is commonly used is to multiply by 1.14--though lower conversion factors are sometimes used. Note that even after correcting for the difference between using 1-minute and 10-minute wind averaging times, the JMA wind estimates are well below what JTWC estimated; JMA consistently estimates weaker winds for high-end typhoons than JTWC. Since we have no actual measurements of the winds or pressure from Haiyan at landfall, we don't know which agency made a more accurate wind estimate.

With Angela Fritz' help, I've put together a list of most intense world tropical cyclones at landfall, using 1-minute averaging times. The list is unofficial and may have omissions; email me at jmasters@wunderground.com if you have suggestions for improvement:



Tropical disturbance 90W will bring more heavy rain to the Philippines
A tropical disturbance located east of the Philippines near 5°N 136°E, (Invest 90W), is steadily organizing, and has the potential to become a tropical depression by Monday. The disturbance has developed an elongated surface circulation and a respectable amount of heavy thunderstorm activity. Wind shear is low, but the disturbance is too close to the Equator intensify quickly, since the storm will not be able to leverage Earth's spin to get itself spinning. The disturbance has a high chance of development, according to Sunday's 17:30 UTC Western Pacific Tropical Weather Discussion by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. A number of recent runs by the GFS model have predicted that the disturbance will organize into a tropical depression or weak tropical storm by Tuesday, when it will pass through the southern or central Philippines. I expect 90W will be organized enough to bring heavy rains of 2 - 4" to the area devastated by Super Typhoon Haiyan on Tuesday and Wednesday, and give a 70% chance it will be a tropical depression or weak tropical storm by Tuesday. The Japan Meteorological Agency is already classifying 90W as a tropical depression.

The Red Cross is appealing for donations.

Portlight disaster relief charity is reaching out to disability organizations in the Philippines to provide durable medical equipment. and welcomes donations.

Google Person Finder: Typhoon Yolanda - Google.org

Links
Wunderblogger Lee Grenci discusses mesovorticies in the eye of Haiyan in his latest post.
Wunderground's weather historian Christopher C. Burt reviews the Philippine's typhoon history.
The University of Wisconsin CIMSS Satellite Blog has a great collection of satellite images of Haiyan.
NOAA's Michael Folmer has a post showing the unusual burst of lightning that occurred at landfall in Haiyan.
Hurricanes and Climate Change: Huge Dangers, Huge Unknows, my August 2013 blog post.
Storm Chaser James Reynolds on Twitter, from Tacloban, Leyte.
Storm Chaser Jim Edds on Twitter, from Tacloban, Leyte.

Jeff Masters

Hurricane

The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

Reader Comments

Quoting 498. GatorWX:


Look at the stumps on the hillsides in the distance. A few palms left standing, but that's it. It's almost completely deforested. I've seen strong cat 4 damage personally. That's beyond anything I've witnessed.


Yea, it is absolutely terrible.... :(

Look at that house...

Victory island........ Looks more like a barren wasteland.

By the way, how have other islands been doing after Haiyan struck? I don't believe there is many information from islands like Negros, Panay or Busuanga Island, where the cyclone was still at Cat 4-5 strength.



These people in this house are lucky to be alive.... The ones in the top floor are in so much danger.

Man guarding his store from looters:



Tropical Cyclone 03A Makes Landfall in Somalia
Tropical Cyclone 03A made landfall today in east central Somalia with sustained winds of tropical-storm force. On Nov. 11 at 0300 UTC/Nov. 10 at 10 p.m. EDT, TC03A was centered near 8.5 north and 49.7 east, about 175 nautical miles south-southwest of Ras Binnah, Somalia. It was moving west at 8 knots/9.2 mph/14.8 kph. Maximum sustained winds were near 35 knots/40 mph/64.8 kph.
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite called TRMM captured data on rainfall rates within the storm after it made landfall. TRMM showed light rainfall throughout most of the tropical storm with areas of moderate rain in the northwestern and east to southeastern quadrants. In the areas of moderate rain (green), rain was falling at up to 1.18 inches/30 mm per hour. Infrared imagery showed that TC03A maintained it's symmetry after it made landfall.
The tropical storm is expected to dissipate over land later today, Nov. 11.
Filipino troopers looking for dead bodies...

Haiyan from the ISS:





Brian Norcross is on MSNBC right now.
First photo I have seen out of Vietnam....

Sorry this video is in Tagalog but the vision I believe shows cat 5 winds at Palo, Leyte.

Ariel view of the destruction. (youtube vid.)

Link
Vietnam.

Storms kills about 100 in Somalia's Puntland, more missing

BOSASSO, Somalia Mon Nov 11, 2013 8:52am EST

(Reuters) - At least 100 people were killed over the weekend when a tropical cyclone hit Somalia's semi-autonomous Puntland region, President Abdirahman Mohamud Farole said on Monday, appealing for help from aid agencies.

"A heavy storm hit Bandarbeyle and Eyl towns on Saturday and Sunday. About a hundred people died. Hundreds of houses and livestock were swept by the floods into the ocean," Farole told reporters in the capital Garowe.

"We urge United Nations aid agencies to assist the victims. As Puntland, we have established a committee to investigate the loss and damage. Electricity, communication and fishing boats were all destroyed."

The government of Puntland said in a statement that hundreds of people remained unaccounted for and declared a natural disaster emergency.

Puntland spans the relatively calm north of Somalia and has largely escaped the worst of Somalia's upheaval of the last 20 years. Foreign powers advocating a loose federal political system in Somalia have held it up as a possible model.

The area is rich in energy resources and is being sized up by oil explorers. However, Puntland's authorities have said insecurity is growing, and blame the Islamist al Shabaab militia, which has been driven out of many regions that it used to control in the remainder of Somalia.


(Reporting by Abdiqani Hassan; Writing by James Macharia; Editing by Kevin Liffey)

Wikipedia article Puntland/Somalia.
Storm-chaser says PH typhoon ‘off the scale’

For professional storm-chaser James Reynolds, whose day job involves capturing typhoons, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions at heart-stoppingly close range, intense danger goes with the territory.
But the soft-spoken cameraman, who has spent the past eight years filming Asia’s deadliest natural disasters including the aftermath of Japan’s 2011 quake-tsunami catastrophe, says Super Typhoon “Yolanda” (international name: Haiyan) was the most terrifying event he has witnessed.
“I’ve chased nothing like this before. This was just totally off the scale both in terms of the violence of the storm and then the human tragedy, the consequences of such a powerful natural event hitting a city of 200,000 people,” Reynolds told AFP.
“Scientists are saying it’s a candidate for one of the strongest storms to ever hit land. From a personal point of view, this was the most calamitous event I’ve witnessed,” said the 30-year-old who has faced more than 35 typhoons at first hand.
Haiyan left unimaginable destruction in its wake after it smashed into the Philippines early on Friday, leaving more than 10,000 feared dead and sparking a worldwide relief effort.
Hong Kong-based Reynolds and his crew of two flew to Manila days before the typhoon was scheduled to strike, setting up camp in Tacloban, the coastal city which bore the brunt of the storm when it made landfall.
Years of storm-chasing has taught Reynolds to choose hotels with strong concrete structures that will remain upright and to stay elevated to avoid being caught in the storm surge flooding the city after it makes landfall.
Footage shot from his hotel balcony shows the unfolding destruction as winds reaching 315 kilometers (195 miles) an hour and sheets of rain sweep in from the Pacific, destroying his videocamera and forcing him to improvise with a small Go-Pro camera and then an iPhone.
“It was just a deafening roar, the wind screaming. You could feel the building shaking as large objects were crashing into the side of the hotel. For anyone out in the street exposed to it, it would have been instant death.”
As the streets flooded with seawater the cameramen found themselves turning rescuers as elderly people staying the ground floor of the hotel became trapped in their rooms by the rising waters.
They used mattresses as makeshift rafts to float them to safety in the stairwell of the building.
“Thankfully in our hotel everyone made it out safely, but the next day we could see bodies of people lying in the vicinity of the hotel, people who didn’t make it through the storm,” Reynolds said.
“I ventured down right to the coastline where a community had basically been wiped out. It looked like a tsunami had come through, shell-shocked citizens sifting through the rubble of their homes, trying to calculate if they had anything left at all.
“It was every man, woman and child for themselves. We saw desperate people looting for food, water, medicines.”
The team were forced to leave the Philippines earlier than planned after one of his team severely injured himself on a piece of sheet metal floating in the filthy, debris-stricken floodwater, leaving a six-inch gash in his leg that cut through to the shinbone.
“It was honestly a life or death situation, he needed medical attention as soon as possible. When you are trapped in a tropical environment with a massive leg wound if you get an infection it doesn’t take long for things to go very, very bad.”
While visibly shaken, Reynolds says he has no plans to give up on getting as close as possible to the disasters that batter Asia with tragic frequency.
“I want to put myself firmly within the storm and document it so people can see not only what it’s like to go through one of these storms, but the far-reaching effects they have on the communities they hit — in this case, extreme, extreme, devastation.”
Can you delete the photo of the dead man please..I'am disturbed.
Quoting washingtonian115:
Can you delete the photo of the dead man please..I'am disturbed.

I agree, if you want, Torito, just post a link.
Quoting 519. washingtonian115:
Can you delete the photo of the dead man please..I'am disturbed.



Yea, sorry, fellow Marylander.

:|
Quoting 520. AussieStorm:

I agree, if you want, Torito, just post a link.


Sorry, and good afternoon, Aussie.
Quoting 521. Torito:



Yea, sorry, fellow Marylander.

:|
Thank you ;).Psss D.C
524. MPI88
Quoting 495. Torito:
I think this man is dead..... So saddening.



Be careful with graphic images. Sadly enough it is the truth as it is, however it might be slightly too much for some.

I'm kinda getting fed up with all the "dead body" images on the front page of several news-websites. I find it disrespectful to the deceased and completely unnecessary "shock and awe" journalism. To images of obliterated villages leave plenty of room for interpretation.

There is a set of high resolution areal imagery available on this Dutch website.
Use your Hide feature,

Its there for a reason
Quoting 523. washingtonian115:
Thank you ;).Psss D.C


Carroll county ;)

Link
Bohol

Quoting 440. barbamz:
Somalis 'killed in Puntland' during tropical cyclone
BBC, 11 November 2013 Last updated at 11:13 GMT

A tropical cyclone that hit the north-eastern Somali region of Puntland over the weekend killed up to 100 people, the regional lead has told the BBC.

Puntland's President Abdirahman Farole said thousands of livestock had also died and hundreds of homes had been destroyed.

The semi-autonomous region was hit by strong winds, heavy rains and flash floods on Saturday and Sunday.

Some fishermen have also been reported missing.

The tropical cyclone, known as 03A, affected coastal areas and continued inland.

Mr Farole said the areas affected were now inaccessible by road.

The authorities were trying to organise to send in food - dates and biscuits - by air to those affected by the cyclone, he said.




Edit: Looking at this water vapor sat pic (saved one) I guess the flooding issue continues today.


(Saved pic. Source for updates)

Yeah, steering is very weak in the area right now, with only a slow westward drift occurring.

Quoting 524. MPI88:


Be careful with graphic images. Sadly enough it is the truth as it is, however it might be slightly too much for some.

I'm kinda getting fed up with all the "dead body" images on the front page of several news-websites. I find it disrespectful to the deceased and completely unnecessary "shock and awe" journalism. To images of obliterated villages leave plenty of room for interpretation.

There is a set of high resolution imagery available on this Dutch website.


Thanks for the link, bra.
Look at those wilted trees.

Quoting Torito:


Sorry, and good afternoon, Aussie.


Good morning :-(

Borongan, Eastern Samar.

Radar of haiyan making landfall.

TWC NEW LOOK COMES TOMORROW.
Quoting 523. washingtonian115:
Thank you ;).Psss D.C


Will we see a sandy again this year?

I hope not.

Link

Link form because the GIF lags this website.
Good morning, afternoon and evening, everyone. And a huge thank you to all our veterans!

Again, my heartfelt prayers to those affected by Haiyan.

Breakfast's on the sideboard: Berry Stuffed French Toast with Vanilla Yogurt Sauce, Ricotta Stuffed French Toast with Caramelized Bananas, five grain cereal, oats and raisins with low fat milk, Boston Cream Pie Pancakes, bacon, egg and cheese Breakfast Cupcakes, Cinnamon Breakfast Bites, baked eggs and spinach, cheese Danishes, yogurt, fresh fruit and orange, apple or pineapple juice. Regular and decaf coffee with flavored creamers to the side. Enjoy!
Quoting 524. MPI88:


Be careful with graphic images. Sadly enough it is the truth as it is, however it might be slightly too much for some.

I'm kinda getting fed up with all the "dead body" images on the front page of several news-websites. I find it disrespectful to the deceased and completely unnecessary "shock and awe" journalism. To images of obliterated villages leave plenty of room for interpretation.

There is a set of high resolution areal imagery available on this Dutch website.

Agree. Avoiding such on my FB page.
Thanks for this link!
Pope Francis @Pontifex
We remember the Philippines, Vietnam and the entire region hit by the Typhoon Haiyan. Please be generous with prayers and concrete help.

Amen


Goodnight
Quoting 531. AussieStorm:


Good morning :-(

Borongan, Eastern Samar.



Quoting 534. Torito:


Will we see a sandy again this year?

I hope not.



Are you forgetting that it is 2013?
Quoting 537. Torito:




Nothing to see here folks.


Marines: "There's a lot we can do."

Brigadier Gen. Paul Kennedy arrived at the Tacloban airport at the head of a U.S. Marines relief effort that includes helicopters as well as four huge C-130 aircraft to ferry in relief supplies.

Kennedy received a warm greeting from a Filipino officer and projected confidence in an interview with CNN's Paula Hancocks.

"There's a lot we can do," Kennedy said.

Kennedy said his marines will set up floodlights and radar to keep the airport operating after dark.

Not far away from the military operation, passengers lined up in the damaged terminal for commercial flights.


Runways blocked by trees this weekend had been cleared, and passenger jets were on the tarmac. Local airlines were working together on flight plans.

Quoting 543. FunnelVortex:


Nothing to see here folks.


Do not forget what today is, everyone...

Quoting 546. Torito:
Do not forget what today is, everyone...



Monday?
Quoting 548. FunnelVortex:


Monday?


-______-

Vortex of DakTrap 2 (new system.)

;D

Quoting 550. Torito:
Vortex of DakTrap 2 (new system.)

;D



I liked DakPatVortex better.
Nope, nothing to see here.

I salute all veterans and their families for their sacrifice in making the USA the greatest country in the world!



Published Nov 11, 2013 [I'm not totally sure whether this video was taken today or recently though]

Google Translation of the caption in Vietnamese language [edit: of course, the original meaning may differ!]: Magic Animal has arisen despite the Haiyan typhoon hit vietnam. This strange beast seems to be a giant monster that dug out of the ground [= was washed ashore??] in Vietnam. Residents in fear are witnessing this strange animal in the lift up to the trailer. Who can give a picture of what animal this is?
Quoting 553. FunnelVortex:
Nope, nothing to see here.



Nothing to see here at all

The end of a monster

11/11/11

I'm not sold that there is a closed circulation under there.

563. MahFL
Quoting 506. Torito:



These people in this house are lucky to be alive.... The ones in the top floor are in so much danger.


How are the ones on the top floor in danger ?
Quoting 555. barbamz:


Published Nov 11, 2013 [I'm not totally sure whether this video was taken today or recently though]

Google Translation of the caption in Vietnamese language: Magic Animal has arisen despite the Haiyan typhoon hit vietnam. This strange beast seems to be a giant monster that dug out of the ground in Vietnam. Residents in fear are witnessing this strange animal in the lift up to the trailer
Who can give a picture of what animal this is?


Seriously? A magic animal that came up out of the ground??? Sounds and looks a bit hoax-ish lol.
Quoting 563. MahFL:


How are the ones on the top floor in danger ?


Uhh, they cant get down and the place is about to collapse?
Tonight on MNF it's , Team Bullies vs. Team MRSA!
Quoting 564. GatorWX:


Seriously? A magic animal that came up out of the ground??? Sounds and looks a bit hoax-ish lol.


Maybe the original meaning is that this "seamonster" was washed ashore, coming up from the seaflor. My skills in Vietnamese language aren't that great that I'm able to correct Googles translations, sorry, lol :)
568. MahFL
Quoting 565. FunnelVortex:


Uhh, they cant get down and the place is about to collapse?


No, if you look carefully they have already put up a washing line to dry out their clothes on the second floor, the house is not going to collapse. They are pretty lucky compared to others to have the shell left.
Camille was unimaginably strong although I was a long ways from the center.

Andrew was the worst. I was a couple miles outside the right front quad of the eyewall in Kendall. The Labor Day storm monument is 20 miles from here.

Can't imagine Haiyam. - take care.

From the Key West NWS

.CLIMATE...ON THIS DATE IN KEYS WEATHER HISTORY...NOVEMBER
ELEVENTH...IN 1980...22.75 INCHES OF RAIN FELL IN KEY WEST...DUE TO
TROPICAL STORM/HURRICANE JEANNE WHICH STALLED SEVERAL HUNDRED MILES
WEST OF KEY WEST. THIS WAS THE WETTEST DAY EVER RECORDED IN KEY
WEST. RAINFALL RECORDS FOR KEY WEST DAY BACK TO 1871.
Quoting 569. docrod:
Camille was unimaginably strong although I was a long ways from the center.

Andrew was the worst. I was a couple miles outside the right front quad of the eyewall in Kendall. The Labor Day storm monument is 20 miles from here.

Can't imagine Haiyam. - take care.

From the Key West NWS

.CLIMATE...ON THIS DATE IN KEYS WEATHER HISTORY...NOVEMBER
ELEVENTH...IN 1980...22.75 INCHES OF RAIN FELL IN KEY WEST...DUE TO
TROPICAL STORM/HURRICANE JEANNE WHICH STALLED SEVERAL HUNDRED MILES
WEST OF KEY WEST. THIS WAS THE WETTEST DAY EVER RECORDED IN KEY
WEST. RAINFALL RECORDS FOR KEY WEST DAY BACK TO 1871.


Do you intentionally go after these things or something? Because all those storms hit different places.
555. barbamz

That is a beached Whale, not from under the ground but from the stormy waters.
Quoting 164. violet312s:
Try this one: Link


Thank you for that link. It enabled me to track it for hours after the other guys declared victory and published the premature articles. By the time I'd gone to bed it had dropped as low as 72 km and it looks like it made it 1 1/2 orbits more, at about 8 km net drop per half orbit it must have been only been about 50 km high when it finally dropped, based on the reported drop site near Antarctica and South America.

Heck of a satellite, it had wings.
Quoting 571. fireflymom:
555. barbamz

That is a beached Whale, not from under the ground but from the stormy waters.


I guessed this too, lol. If somebody knows which sort of whale you may post it into the comment section of the youtube video to help the guy out :)

Quoting 567. barbamz:


Maybe the original meaning is that this "seamonster" was washed ashore, coming up from the seaflor. My skills in Vietnamese language aren't that great that I'm able to correct Googles translations, sorry, lol :)


:) I think it's a baleen whale, a magical, majestic creature nonetheless.
Pretty certain it is a Sperm Whale but at work so not able to post over there.
Quoting 573. barbamz:


I guessed this too, lol. If somebody knows which sort of whale you may post it into the comment section of the youtube video to help the guy out :)


Patrap and all fellow Marines, Happy Belated Birthday....HORAAAH
Quoting 562. 1900hurricane:
I'm not sold that there is a closed circulation under there.


OSCAT caught a broad circulation. ASCAT was by it 3hrs before & it was less defined.

Quoting 532. Torito:
Radar of haiyan making landfall.


On the radar images you posted you will note that there is a town called Ormoc on the opposite side of the island which appears to be dead centre in the eye of the typhoon as it passes over it.

LEYTE , Philippines %u2013 Ormoc City is in a state of calamity.

Energy Secretary Jericho Petilla, a former governor of Leyte, said Typhoon Yolanda destroyed houses and buildings, and 90 percent of the city was wrecked.
Quoting 566. EyEtoEyE:
Tonight on MNF it's , Team Bullies vs. Team MRSA!


Also called the dysfunctional bowl. That's coming from a Bucs fan.
Quoting 578. PlazaRed:

On the radar images you posted you will note that there is a town called Ormoc on the opposite side of the island which appears to be dead centre in the eye of the typhoon as it passes over it.


Reports from Ormoc were one of the first to emerge, serious devastation and probably quite a high number of deaths, but not THAT bad compared to Tacloban or areas on the eastern Philippine coast.
JeffMasters has created a new entry.


90W/Zoraida closing in Mindanao/Philippines. Later it may head towards southern Vietnam.

Intensity forecasts:



Tracks:

Quoting 570. FunnelVortex:


Do you intentionally go after these things or something? Because all those storms hit different places.


Nope - I was not around when the labor day storm hit.

Elsewise - just dumb luck
Quoting 363. TropicalAnalystwx13:

Most people would disagree with you on that, including myself. Some of the video I've seen from Tacloban looks much more intense than that of the Charley video. In addition, the iCyclone team noted that they recorded strong Category 4 sustained winds in the city with a high likelihood that the southern portion of the city near the airport got sustained Category 5 winds.


I do not believe they say they "recorded" anything wind wise. They had a barometer with them which is a very simply machine, and even the cheapest ones can be quite accurate. You can measure pressure from inside a building, but you have to be in an open field to record the max winds in a hurricane. They, wisely, were in a protected area, on the lee side of the wind, in a strong concrete structure.

Not saying "wisely" in general, just their relative position at the time. . IMO chasing a cat #5 hurricane is simply stupid. No different than purposely driving a black Camero, or a light-blue VW mini-van, into the trunk of an F3-F4 tornado.

4000-plus people that mostly had no choice but to be where they were, very sadly and heart-wrenching as it is, did perish during the typhoon.

As far as one of the chasers quickly saying they would "do it again"; well, let me leave the conclusions of the sanity or wiseness of that statement to the reader.

And LUCKILY for them, the highest winds did not occur where they were located. Very intense wind for sure, but not Haiyan's maximum - that occurred on the south shore of Samar Island during its initial landfall; then somewhat less wind several miles south of downtown Tacloban during the second landfall.

The video posted a few posts up shows intense winds; BUT the torrential rain cuts the visibility so low, no-one can really accurately estimate the wind speed from the video images. You don't see trees bending over almost to the ground or snapping. You don't see any large debris flying through the air. You don't notice the power poles snapping or being flattened. (Not saying that wasn't happening around and about; but you don't see that in the video.)

After Andrew along and near US 1 in S. Miami-Dade from SW 144 st south to Homestead, a mile or two from the shoreline, SUSTAINED winds were of category #4 strength according to the NHC study. (the few sustained cat 5 winds were all right at the shoreline.). Every single power pole, wood, concrete, and steel, was either snapped, flattened, or bent over almost to the ground (only some of the concrete/ steel ones were not completely flattened.). From 144th. street to S. Homestead is a 10 mile stretch along those inland locations along US1.

Just because the number 4 is lower than the number 5, that does not mean sustained category #4 winds do not cause extreme damage. The Saffir Simpson scale simply states that in cat #4 storms "Catastrophic damage will occur".: Even more so for a cat #5 tropical cyclone.

Most of the deadliest hurricanes, typhoons, or Bay of Bengal cyclones (all the same animal) in history were of category #4 intensity.

Most of the above is only IMO, of course.