Share

Winter Storm Rex Forecast: Snow for New England Through Early Wednesday Morning

By: By Nick Wiltgen
Published: February 18, 2014

Although a warmer weather pattern will soon take over in the central and eastern U.S., we have to get through one more winter storm before that happens. Winter Storm Rex, the 18th named storm of the 2013-14 winter storm season, has moved through the Midwest and is now sweeping through the Northeast.

(MORE: Spring Fever This Week | Winter Storm Rex Live Ticker)

Rex has proven quite the spectacle, with thundersnow reported in Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana Monday and in parts of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Maryland early Tuesday morning. Here's what you need to know about the rest of Winter Storm Rex's journey.

Background

Current Radar

Current Radar

Current Radar

Current Radar
Background

Winter Weather Alerts

Winter Weather Alerts

Winter Weather Alerts

Winter Weather Alerts
Background

48-Hour Snowfall Forecast

48-Hour Snowfall Forecast

48-Hour Snowfall Forecast

48-Hour Snowfall Forecast

Midwest

Northeast

  • What's already happened: Rex Snow, Ice, Thundersnow Reports | State-by-State Impacts
  • How much snow: Maximum storm total accumulations have affected areas of Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Maine. Localized totals in excess of 6 to 10 inches have already been reported in parts of Massachusetts and New Hampshire. In addition, as much as 20 inches of snow fell near Princeton, Maine.
  • Snow ends: Only Maine will hold on to the snow past midnight into the wee hours of Wednesday morning. Snow has ended across the rest of the Northeast.
  • Winds: Locally 15 to 30 mph along the New England coast.
  • Driving impacts: Secondary roads and streets will be snow covered throughout Maine. Primary routes, where appropriately treated, should generally be wet or slushy with reduced travel speeds.
  • Winter weather alerts: Northeast

Rex is the Latin word for "king."

(MORE: Why The Weather Channel Names Winter Storms)

MORE: Winter Storm Rex Photos

Marco Garcia, of Guatemala, shovels snow near the Statehouse in Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014, in Trenton, N.J., after a quick-moving storm brought several inches of snow as well as rare 'thundersnow' to parts of the winter-weary East Coast. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)


Featured Blogs

California Drought/Polar Vortex Jet Stream Pattern Linked to Global Warming

By Dr. Jeff Masters
April 16, 2014

From November 2013 - January 2014, a remarkably extreme jet stream pattern set up over North America, bringing the infamous "Polar Vortex" of cold air to the Midwest and Eastern U.S., and a "Ridiculously Resilient Ridge" of high pressure over California, which brought the worst winter drought conditions ever recorded to that state. A new study by Utah State scientist S.-Y. Simon Wang found that this jet stream pattern was the most extreme on record, and likely could not have grown so extreme without the influence of human-caused global warming.

March 2014 Global Weather Extremes Summary

By Christopher C. Burt
April 15, 2014

March featured a number of anomalous extreme weather events such as the floods in portions of Egypt and New Zealand, a freak hailstorm in Asmara, Eritrea, record warmth in much of Europe, severe cold and snow in the eastern half of the U.S. and heavy rainfall in the Pacific Northwest that culminated in a deadly landslide in Washington. Preliminary data from NASA indicates that globally (land-ocean temperature index), it was the 4th warmest March on record (since 1880).

Polar Vortex, Global Warming, and Cold Weather

By Stu Ostro
January 10, 2014

Some thoughts about the recent viral meme(s).

Just in time for the Holidays! Wundermap has a new layer: Precip Start Time!

By Shaun Tanner
December 23, 2013

The Weather Underground elves have been hard at work developing a brand new layer for the WunderMap and they made their deadline. Enjoy the newest addition to the WunderMap. Also remember to give us your feedback!

What the 5th IPCC Assessment Doesn't Include

By Angela Fritz
September 27, 2013

Melting permafrost has the potential to release an additional 1.5 trillion tons of carbon into the atmosphere, and could increase our global average temperature by 1.5°F in addition to our day-to-day human emissions. However, this effect is not included in the IPCC report issued Friday morning, which means the estimates of how Earth's climate will change are likely on the conservative side.

Astronomical VS. Meteorological Winter

By Tom Niziol
March 1, 2013