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Winter Storm Rex Forecast: Snow for New England Through Early Wednesday Morning

By Nick Wiltgen
Published: February 18, 2014

Although a warmer weather pattern will soon take over in the central and eastern U.S., we have to get through one more winter storm before that happens. Winter Storm Rex, the 18th named storm of the 2013-14 winter storm season, has moved through the Midwest and is now sweeping through the Northeast.

(MORE: Spring Fever This Week | Winter Storm Rex Live Ticker)

Rex has proven quite the spectacle, with thundersnow reported in Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana Monday and in parts of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Maryland early Tuesday morning. Here's what you need to know about the rest of Winter Storm Rex's journey.

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Current Radar

Current Radar

Current Radar

Current Radar
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Winter Weather Alerts

Winter Weather Alerts

Winter Weather Alerts

Winter Weather Alerts
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48-Hour Snowfall Forecast

48-Hour Snowfall Forecast

48-Hour Snowfall Forecast

48-Hour Snowfall Forecast

Midwest

Northeast

  • What's already happened: Rex Snow, Ice, Thundersnow Reports | State-by-State Impacts
  • How much snow: Maximum storm total accumulations have affected areas of Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Maine. Localized totals in excess of 6 to 10 inches have already been reported in parts of Massachusetts and New Hampshire. In addition, as much as 20 inches of snow fell near Princeton, Maine.
  • Snow ends: Only Maine will hold on to the snow past midnight into the wee hours of Wednesday morning. Snow has ended across the rest of the Northeast.
  • Winds: Locally 15 to 30 mph along the New England coast.
  • Driving impacts: Secondary roads and streets will be snow covered throughout Maine. Primary routes, where appropriately treated, should generally be wet or slushy with reduced travel speeds.
  • Winter weather alerts: Northeast

Rex is the Latin word for "king."

(MORE: Why The Weather Channel Names Winter Storms)

MORE: Winter Storm Rex Photos

Marco Garcia, of Guatemala, shovels snow near the Statehouse in Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014, in Trenton, N.J., after a quick-moving storm brought several inches of snow as well as rare 'thundersnow' to parts of the winter-weary East Coast. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)


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