Share

Winter Storm Maximus: Snow Mess in the East Monday

By Jon Erdman
Published: February 3, 2014

Winter Storm Maximus, the 13th named storm of the winter season in the U.S., is bringing one last wintry swipe to the East Monday.

This storm has brought multiple waves of snow, sleet and freezing rain from west to east across the country.

(MORE: Winter Storm Maximus Snow and Ice Reports)

Background

Latest Radar

Latest Radar

Latest Radar

Latest Radar

Background

Snowfall Forecast

Snowfall Forecast

Snowfall Forecast

Snowfall Forecast

Background

Monday's Forecast

Monday's Forecast

Monday's Forecast

Monday's Forecast

Snow will be heavy along parts of the I-95 corridor including the New York City metro area, and any early rain will change to snow farther south including Philadelphia, Baltimore, and the north and west suburbs of Washington, D.C.

Snow will also pick up early Monday morning in Boston.

Expect significant impacts on air travel in the major Northeast, particularly at the three major New York City hubs, with flight delays and, perhaps, a few cancelations possible. Check your flight status before leaving for the airport. Travel conditions will deteriorate, as well, as Monday morning rolls on. 

(TRAVEL IMPACT: Check your flight | Driving difficulty index)

Snow will taper off around midday or early afternoon generally south of the Mason Dixon Line, including Baltimore and Washington, D.C., and will finally exit the rest of the I-95 corridor by early evening. This means another challenging commute in New York City, Hartford and Boston Monday afternoon.

Snow will slowly taper off later Monday morning farther west in parts of West Virginia, southern Ohio, Kentucky, and southern Indiana.

The heaviest additional accumulations Monday will be in a stripe from northern West Virginia and southwest Pennsylvania into northern New Jersey and the New York City metro area, with over five inches of total accumulation expected. 

Lighter accumulations will occur farther south along I-95 including Philadelphia, Baltimore, and the north and the Washington, D.C. metro, where initial rain may persist longer before changing over to wet snow.

Generally three inches or less additional accumulation is expected farther west into parts of southern Ohio, northern Kentucky and southern Indiana.

MORE: Winter Storm Maximus Photos

Snow accumulates near Green Brook, N.J., during Winter Storm Maximus on Feb. 3, 2014. (Edecio Martinez/weather.com)


Featured Blogs

Yangtze Cruise-Ship Disaster: Among the Worst Thunderstorm Tolls on Record?

By Dr. Jeff Masters
June 3, 2015

A picturesque vacation for hundreds of Chinese tourists turned into a nightmare on June 1, when high winds associated with an intense thunderstorm capsized the Oriental Star cruise ship in 50-foot-deep water on the Yangtze River in Hubei Province, southwest of Wuhan, at around 9:30 pm local time. As of Tuesday afternoon, only 14 people had been rescued from about 450 reportedly on board, most of them retirees on a multiday scenic cruise from Nanjing to Chongqing.

Hottest Summers, Coldest Winters for Contiguous U.S.: A Few Years Loom Large

By Christopher C. Burt
May 28, 2015

Keeping track of all-time warmest/coldest daily maximum temperatures and all-time warmest/coldest months on record for any given site is a fairly easy task. However, very few NWS sites provide data concerning what their respective coldest climatological winters (December-February) or hottest climatological summers (June-August) have been. Researching 300 sites in the contiguous U.S. I have put together this summary for such. Below are the methods I used and some of the results, which proved quite interesting.

Please check out the new homepage and tell us what you think!

By Shaun Tanner
April 2, 2015

The development team here at Weather Underground has been hard at work producing a new homepage! Please take a look at the sneak peek and tell us what you think!

Meteorological images of the year - 2014

By Stu Ostro
December 30, 2014

My 9th annual edition.

2013-14 - An Interesting Winter From A to Z

By Tom Niziol
May 15, 2014

It was a very interesting winter across a good part of the nation from the Rockies through the Plains to the Northeast. Let's break down the most significant winter storms on a month by month basis.

What the 5th IPCC Assessment Doesn't Include

By Angela Fritz
September 27, 2013

Melting permafrost has the potential to release an additional 1.5 trillion tons of carbon into the atmosphere, and could increase our global average temperature by 1.5°F in addition to our day-to-day human emissions. However, this effect is not included in the IPCC report issued Friday morning, which means the estimates of how Earth's climate will change are likely on the conservative side.