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Vail Avalanche Update: Grandson of Vail's Founder Killed

January 8, 2014

Eagle County Sheriff's Office

This photo provided by the Eagle County (Colo.) Sheriff's Office shows the area where one person was killed and three others were injured in an avalanche on Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014, in the East Vail Chutes in the back country outside of Vail Mountain’s ski boundary near Vail, Colo.

VAIL, Colo. -- The grandson of Vail's founder was killed and three other people were injured Tuesday in an avalanche near the ski resort, authorities said.

Anthony Seibert, 24, was killed in the slide in the backcountry near Vail, Eagle County Coroner Kara Bettis said. She said Seibert is the grandson of Peter Seibert, who along with Earl Eaton is widely credited with finding the terrain that would later become Vail Mountain.

The three others who were injured were expected to recover from their injuries. Their names weren't released.

Sheriff's spokeswoman Jessie Mosher said the slide happened at around 11:30 a.m. in East Vail Chutes, an area between Vail Mountain and Vail Pass.

(MORE: 5 Cities That Started 2014 With Incredible Temperature Swings)

The death is the fifth in the Rocky Mountain region and the second in Colorado in the last two weeks.

The avalanche danger where the latest deadly slide occurred is rated as considerable at or above the tree line for two main reasons. New snow over the weekend was pushed into slabs by wind, and those more cohesive layers of snow are resting on top of the relatively weak early season snowfall, said Spencer Logan of the Colorado Avalanche Information Center. The combination of a weak base layer under cohesive slabs tends to create slides that break in very wide pieces.

Such dangerous conditions are possible each winter, but last year they didn't develop until late January because significant snowfall didn't develop until later in the season, Logan said.

East Vail Chutes has had a series of slides in the last few weeks, including one that trapped a skier. A popular YouTube video shows Edwin LaMair trapped up to his neck before his brother and a friend dug him out.

MORE: 2013 Colorado Avalanche Deaths

Loveland Pass, Colo.

Loveland Pass, Colo.

An avalanche killed 5 people in Loveland Pass, Colo. on Saturday, April 20, 2013. The avalanche was on the western flank of Mount Sniktau. This is the path the avalanche took. Some of the blocks of snow are the size of small cars. (Photo By Helen H. Richardson/ The Denver Post)

  • Loveland Pass, Colo.
  • Loveland Pass, Colo.
  • Loveland Pass, Colo.
  • Deadly Avalanche in Colorado
  • Deadly Avalanche in Colorado
  • Deadly Avalanche in Colorado
  • Deadly Avalanche in Colorado

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