Earthquakes, Rain to Blame for Collapse of Scenic Highway in Mexico and Associated Press
Published: December 30, 2013

MEXICO CITY — Part of a scenic highway on Mexico’s West coast collapsed Saturday after a series of small earthquakes rocked the area.

The highway, popular with tourists, is 58 miles south of the U.S. border and Tijuana. The road leads to the port city of Ensenada, on the Baja California peninsula. Mexican officials say a 300-yard section collapsed and the road fell about 100 feet.

American Forces Network

The highway leads to Ensenada is a popular scenic route for tourists. (American Forces Network)

The road was closed shortly after the collapse. Traffic is now being diverted onto a smaller highway. No one was injured in the collapse.

The Mexican highway agency told the Associated Press that seven small earthquakes, combined with recent heavy rainfall, were to blame for the collapse. The road runs over a known geological fault, according to Mexican officials.

(WATCH: Predicting an Earthquake)

The road had already seen evidence of fractures and sinking in recent days, according to a San Diego Union-Tribune report which said the small fractures suddenly turned into enormous cracks on the cliffside in the early hours of Saturday.

The road will likely be closed at least several weeks. The scenic highway leads to Ensenada, which is home to the third busiest cruise ship terminal in Mexico.

MORE: How Earthquakes Happen


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