Share

Tornado Confirmed in Ky.; Weather Service to Inspect Damage in Md., Del.

Associated Press
Published: June 11, 2013
 
The National Weather Service has confirmed a tornado touched down near Adairville, in south-central Kentucky on Monday and National Weather Service crews will inspect damage around Delaware and Maryland.
 
The NWS office in Louisville said the EF2 tornado plowed a path estimated at five miles long and as wide as 300 yards.
 
There were three known injuries in Logan County, none of them life-threatening.
 
 
The assessment team said the tornado that struck around 2 p.m. Monday had winds of 135 mph. It killed some livestock and injured several horses that were expected to be put down.
 
One home was demolished and three others were damaged to the point they are uninhabitable. Numerous outbuildings were destroyed and three large grain bins were blown up to a quarter-mile.
 
The storm system continued to wreak havoc as it spread East on Monday.
 
Meteorologist Brandon Peloquin says storm survey crews will visit several locations in central and southern Maryland on Tuesday to determine whether damage reported in those areas was caused by a tornado or straight line winds.
 
"Interestingly Sunday, we saw a waterspout move ashore in the French Riviera," said weather.com senior meteorologist Jon Erdman. "Monday, it was Baltimore's turn."
 
A tornado was reported near Sykesville on Monday and a Howard County fire official reported high winds destroyed a building and detached garage in Woodbine.
 
In Delaware, homes in Newark and Glasgow were damaged and numerous trees were downed. A National Weather Service team may investigate as early as Tuesday whether a tornado struck in the Newark area.
 

Featured Blogs

Gulf of Mexico's 93L a Heavy Rain Threat; Ana Leaves Hawaii Alone

By Dr. Jeff Masters
October 21, 2014

An area of low pressure over the Gulf of Mexico's Bay of Campeche (93L) contains moisture and spin from the Eastern Pacific's Tropical Storm Trudy, which made landfall near Acapulco last weekend. 93L will bring heavy rains to Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, Western Cuba, and South Florida Wednesday through Friday.

What is the Wettest Month of the Year in the U.S.?

By Christopher C. Burt
October 10, 2014

Brian Brettshneider of Borealis Scientific has done some impressive research concerning what the wettest calendar month of the year might be by employing data from 8,535 official NCDC sites from across the U.S. utilizing the latest 30 years of record (1981-2010). His conclusion is that June is, overall, most frequently the wettest month in the U.S. with 2,053 of the 8,535 sites reporting such. April, at the other end of the spectrum, reports only 76 sites of the 8,535 as their wettest month. This is a guest blog by Brian and below are the results of his research (both text and maps are his).

Live Blog: Tracking Hurricane Arthur as it Approaches North Carolina Coast

By Shaun Tanner
July 3, 2014

This is a live blog set up to provide the latest coverage on Hurricane Arthur as it threatens the North Carolina Coast. Check back often to see what the latest is with Arthur. The most recent updates are at the top.

Tropical Terminology

By Stu Ostro
June 30, 2014

Here is some basic, fundamental terminology related to tropical cyclones. Rather than a comprehensive and/or technical glossary, this represents the essence of the meaning & importance of some key, frequently used terms.

2013-14 - An Interesting Winter From A to Z

By Tom Niziol
May 15, 2014

It was a very interesting winter across a good part of the nation from the Rockies through the Plains to the Northeast. Let's break down the most significant winter storms on a month by month basis.

What the 5th IPCC Assessment Doesn't Include

By Angela Fritz
September 27, 2013

Melting permafrost has the potential to release an additional 1.5 trillion tons of carbon into the atmosphere, and could increase our global average temperature by 1.5°F in addition to our day-to-day human emissions. However, this effect is not included in the IPCC report issued Friday morning, which means the estimates of how Earth's climate will change are likely on the conservative side.