Share

Global Greenhouse Gas Emissions Will Rise by Almost a Third by 2035: Study

By Terrell Johnson
Published: January 17, 2014

A BP study released this week says that greenhouse gas emissions worldwide will rise by 29 percent in the next 20 years, imperiling hopes that the world will be able to prevent the impact of dangerous climate change by the end of the century, the U.K.-based Guardian reports.

The oil and gas company's study comes at a time when the British government is "going all-out" in promoting shale gas fracking as an eventual replacement for coal-powered electricity.

Carla Gottgens/Bloomberg/Getty

Shale gas exploration has boomed in the U.S. over the past decade, driving down natural gas prices here to historic lows. Because natural gas releases roughly half the carbon dioxide emitted from burning coal, it has been touted as a substitute for dirtier fossil fuels while usage of renewable energy ramps up.

But the study found that the boom in shale gas won't cut emissions after all – the coal that countries would have burned to produce electricity, they now export to other countries that burn it.

Meanwhile, a draft U.N. report says that governments around the world may have to suck greenhouse gases out of the air later this century, to make up for the progress they're not making on reducing carbon emissions now.

Such emissions will need to drop by 40 to 70 percent from their present-day levels by 2050, Reuters reports, to give the world a reasonable chance of meeting the warming ceiling set by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change – 2°C by 2100.

The world is likely to break the 2°C warming target long before then if emissions aren't cut, the U.N. panel says, opening the door to potentially the most catastrophic effects of climate change.

Read the full story at The Guardian.

 

MORE: Greenland's Melting Reveals Rapid Changes in the Arctic

Greenland's Melting Ice Reveals A Rapidly Changing Arctic

Greenland's Melting Ice Reveals A Rapidly Changing Arctic

This series of photos, taken on an expedition to Greenland's North and South lake sites by a team from the University of Washington and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in July 2010, give an up-close view of how quickly the island's ice sheet is melting. (Photo by Ian Joughin PSC/APL/UW)

  • Greenland's Melting Ice Reveals A Rapidly Changing Arctic
  • Greenland's Melting Ice Reveals A Rapidly Changing Arctic
  • Greenland's Melting Ice Reveals A Rapidly Changing Arctic
  • Greenland's Melting Ice Reveals A Rapidly Changing Arctic
  • Greenland's Melting Ice Reveals A Rapidly Changing Arctic
  • Greenland's Melting Ice Reveals A Rapidly Changing Arctic
  • Greenland's Melting Ice Reveals A Rapidly Changing Arctic
  • Greenland's Melting Ice Reveals A Rapidly Changing Arctic
  • Greenland's Melting Ice Reveals A Rapidly Changing Arctic

 

 

 


Featured Blogs

Hottest Summers, Coldest Winters for Contiguous U.S.: A Few Years Loom Large

By Christopher C. Burt
May 28, 2015

Keeping track of all-time warmest/coldest daily maximum temperatures and all-time warmest/coldest months on record for any given site is a fairly easy task. However, very few NWS sites provide data concerning what their respective coldest climatological winters (December-February) or hottest climatological summers (June-August) have been. Researching 300 sites in the contiguous U.S. I have put together this summary for such. Below are the methods I used and some of the results, which proved quite interesting.

Tropical Storm Andres Forms in the Northeast Pacific; Not a Threat to Mexico

By Dr. Jeff Masters
May 28, 2015

The Northeast Pacific's first named storm of 2015 is here. Tropical Storm Andres formed at 11 am EDT on Thursday, in the waters about 690 miles southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico. The first named storm of the Northeast Pacific hurricane season usually forms by June 10, so we are nearly two weeks ahead of climatology.

Please check out the new homepage and tell us what you think!

By Shaun Tanner
April 2, 2015

The development team here at Weather Underground has been hard at work producing a new homepage! Please take a look at the sneak peek and tell us what you think!

Meteorological images of the year - 2014

By Stu Ostro
December 30, 2014

My 9th annual edition.

2013-14 - An Interesting Winter From A to Z

By Tom Niziol
May 15, 2014

It was a very interesting winter across a good part of the nation from the Rockies through the Plains to the Northeast. Let's break down the most significant winter storms on a month by month basis.

What the 5th IPCC Assessment Doesn't Include

By Angela Fritz
September 27, 2013

Melting permafrost has the potential to release an additional 1.5 trillion tons of carbon into the atmosphere, and could increase our global average temperature by 1.5°F in addition to our day-to-day human emissions. However, this effect is not included in the IPCC report issued Friday morning, which means the estimates of how Earth's climate will change are likely on the conservative side.