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Strong Earthquake Rocks Western Greece, Injuries Reported

By: By Nick Wiltgen
Published: January 26, 2014

A strong earthquake rocked western Greece Sunday. According to the Associated Press, shaking from the quake damaged buildings and left several with injuries on the island of Kefalonia some 175 miles west of Athens.

According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the quake struck at 3:55 p.m. local time (8:55 a.m. EST in the U.S.) and registered a magnitude of 6.0. The quake's hypocenter was 11.7 miles below the town of Lixouri on the island of Kefalonia (Cephalonia).

The USGS "Did You Feel It?" page indicated the quake was felt as far away as Athens, on the opposite side of Greece, as well as parts of Albania and the Salento peninsula of southeastern Italy.

Background

Quake Location

Quake Location

Quake Location

Quake Location

The Athens Geodynamic Insistute analyzed the earthquake's magnitude at 5.8.

A local news website, kefaloniapress.gr, reports some damage on roads and buildings in the towns of Lixouri and Argostoli, the island's largest, but no casualties.

Another Greek website, ethnos.gr, reports that some old buildings near the epicenter have collapsed, but that otherwise broken windows were the primary mode of damage. The site said landslides had blocked some roads in northern parts of the island of Kefalonia, citing local police.

There have been 12 aftershocks over a magnitude of three in the hours that have followed the initial quake, including one with a magnitude-4.5.

Such earthquakes are not rare in Greece. Kefalonia and the nearby island of Zakynthos were devastated by a magnitude-7.2 quake on August 12, 1953.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

MORE: Deadliest Earthquakes Since 1990

India: Sept. 29, 1993

India: Sept. 29, 1993

The first of two of the top-10 deadliest earthquakes of the last 25 years that occurred in India was a 6.2 temblor that killed 9,748, according to the USGS. (DOUGLAS E. CURRAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • India: Sept. 29, 1993
  • Turkey: Aug. 17, 1999
  • India: Jan. 26, 2001
  • Japan: March 11, 2011
  • Southeastern Iran: Dec. 26, 2003
  • Iran: June 20, 1990
  • Pakistan: Oct. 8, 2005
  • Eastern Sichuan, China: May 12, 2008
  • Northern Sumatra: Dec. 26, 2004
  • Haiti Earthquake: Jan. 12, 2010

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