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Lake Superior's Apostle Island Sea Caves Open for the First Time in Years, and They'll Mystify You (PHOTOS)

By Sean Breslin
Published: February 17, 2014

Warmer winters have robbed us of a striking natural wonder, but this cold winter has brought it back.

(PHOTOS: See Why This Family's Homemade Igloo Is One-of-a-Kind)

Along the shore of Lake Superior, sea caves cool off in the winter months, allowing thousands of icicles to form on the inside. For the first time in half a decade, these caves are open to foot traffic because the ice over the lake is thick enough to allow it, reports TwinCities.com. 

The report adds that in the 10 days that followed the opening of the caves, an estimated 10,000 visitors came to gaze at the ice caves – an unprecedented turnout, according to Neil Howk with the National Park Service.

(MORE: Winters Are Getting Warmer, But ...)

And as long as the lake remains safely frozen for onlookers to travel, the ice caves will likely remain open through March, according to a San Jose Mercury News report.

A collection of images from inside the ice caves can be viewed below.

The Apostle Island ice cave, located along the shores of Lake Superior near Bayfield, Wis., is seen on Feb. 4, 2014. It is the first time since 2009 that the caves can be visited by walking across frozen Lake Superior. (US Department of Interior)


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