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50 States Biggest Snow Days

Chris Dolce | TWC
Published: January 14, 2013

Florida: 4 inches

Florida: 4 inches

weather.com

Milton, Florida, located just to the northeast of Pensacola, recorded 4 inches of snow on March 6, 1954. Image: Snow at the Alabama/Florida border on Feb. 12, 2010 from iWitness Weather contributor ismsan.

  • Florida: 4 inches
  • Mississippi: 15 inches
  • Louisiana: 16 inches
  • Arkansas: 18 inches
  • South Carolina: 18 inches
  • Alabama: 18.5 inches
  • Georgia: 19.3 inches
  • Kentucky: 20 inches
  • Tennessee: 20.8 inches
  • Iowa: 21 inches
  • Indiana: 22 inches
  • Ohio: 22 inches
  • Oklahoma: 23 inches
  • Illinois: 24 inches
  • Missouri: 24 inches
  • Nebraska: 24 inches
  • North Dakota: 24 inches
  • Texas: 24 inches
  • Delaware: 25 inches
  • Kansas: 25 inches
  • Wisconsin: 25 inches
  • Nevada: 26 inches
  • Connecticut: 28 inches
  • Massachusetts: 29 Inches
  • North Carolina: 29 inches
  • Idaho: 30 inches
  • Michigan: 30 inches
  • Rhode Island: 30 inches
  • Maryland: 31 inches
  • New Jersey: 33 Inches
  • Vermont: 33 inches
  • West Virginia: 33 inches
  • Virginia: 33.5 inches
  • Wyoming: 34 inches
  • Maine: 35 inches
  • Utah: 35 inches
  • Minnesota: 36 inches
  • New Mexico: 36 inches
  • Oregon: 37 inches
  • Arizona: 38 inches
  • Pennsylvania: 38 inches
  • New Hampshire: 41 inches
  • New York: 45 inches
  • South Dakota: 47 inches
  • Montana: 48 inches
  • Washington: 48 inches
  • California: 60 Inches
  • Alaska: 62 inches
  • Colorado: 63 inches
  • Hawaii: No data available

The snowiest day on record for each state in the country covers a wide range from less than six inches to more than five feet.

In the slideshow above is the record highest single-day snowfall totals for all the states in the country starting with the lowest total in Florida and ending with the highest totals in the western states. The description under each image shows the exact location and date of each single-day snowfall record.

As you will see in the final slide above, it does snow in the upper elevations of Hawaii, however there is no snowfall data available to rank the nation's 50th state among the other 49 states.

All of this information is from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) division of the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which has analyzed various snowfall records for the country in each state.


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