Winter Weather Watch: 2013-2014 Recap

By Tom Niziol
Published: May 2, 2014

Winter Storms 2013-2014

Winter Storm Names

In an effort to increase awareness and enhance communication of disruptive, impactful winter storms, The Weather Channel named winter storms starting in the 2012-2013 season.  We are using a new list of names, shown above, for the 2013-2014 season.

(MORE: Origin of the Names | Science Behind Naming Winter Storms)

In all, there were 27 named winter storms in 2012-2013 spanning over five months beginning with the post-Sandy Winter Storm Athena in early November and ending with Winter Storm Achilles in early May.

(MORE: Winter's Named Storms from A to Z)

Not every winter weather system will receive a name. The Weather Channel has specific criteria in place to determine when we name a particular winter storm. Our two main criteria for naming a winter storm are:

  • It is forecast to produce conditions that meet the National Weather Service winter-weather warning threshold(s) over a main population center or multiple states, beginning generally within 48 hours.
  • It is forecast to produce winter weather conditions that would be historic, especially unusual, or memorable, beginning generally within 48 hours.

For more coverage of winter weather, check out our Winter Storm Central page.


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