Vail Avalanche Update: Grandson of Vail's Founder Killed

January 8, 2014

Eagle County Sheriff's Office

This photo provided by the Eagle County (Colo.) Sheriff's Office shows the area where one person was killed and three others were injured in an avalanche on Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014, in the East Vail Chutes in the back country outside of Vail Mountain’s ski boundary near Vail, Colo.

VAIL, Colo. -- The grandson of Vail's founder was killed and three other people were injured Tuesday in an avalanche near the ski resort, authorities said.

Anthony Seibert, 24, was killed in the slide in the backcountry near Vail, Eagle County Coroner Kara Bettis said. She said Seibert is the grandson of Peter Seibert, who along with Earl Eaton is widely credited with finding the terrain that would later become Vail Mountain.

The three others who were injured were expected to recover from their injuries. Their names weren't released.

Sheriff's spokeswoman Jessie Mosher said the slide happened at around 11:30 a.m. in East Vail Chutes, an area between Vail Mountain and Vail Pass.

(MORE: 5 Cities That Started 2014 With Incredible Temperature Swings)

The death is the fifth in the Rocky Mountain region and the second in Colorado in the last two weeks.

The avalanche danger where the latest deadly slide occurred is rated as considerable at or above the tree line for two main reasons. New snow over the weekend was pushed into slabs by wind, and those more cohesive layers of snow are resting on top of the relatively weak early season snowfall, said Spencer Logan of the Colorado Avalanche Information Center. The combination of a weak base layer under cohesive slabs tends to create slides that break in very wide pieces.

Such dangerous conditions are possible each winter, but last year they didn't develop until late January because significant snowfall didn't develop until later in the season, Logan said.

East Vail Chutes has had a series of slides in the last few weeks, including one that trapped a skier. A popular YouTube video shows Edwin LaMair trapped up to his neck before his brother and a friend dug him out.

MORE: 2013 Colorado Avalanche Deaths

Loveland Pass, Colo.

Loveland Pass, Colo.

An avalanche killed 5 people in Loveland Pass, Colo. on Saturday, April 20, 2013. The avalanche was on the western flank of Mount Sniktau. This is the path the avalanche took. Some of the blocks of snow are the size of small cars. (Photo By Helen H. Richardson/ The Denver Post)

  • Loveland Pass, Colo.
  • Loveland Pass, Colo.
  • Loveland Pass, Colo.
  • Deadly Avalanche in Colorado
  • Deadly Avalanche in Colorado
  • Deadly Avalanche in Colorado
  • Deadly Avalanche in Colorado

Ad Blocker Enabled

Featured Blogs

Darby Falling Apart as it Makes Landfall on Hawaii's Big Island

By Dr. Jeff Masters
July 23, 2016

Tropical Storm Warnings are flying for the Big Island of Hawaii, Maui and Oahu as Tropical Storm Darby dashes itself against the high mountains of the Big Island. Saturday evening satellite loops showed that Darby was becoming misshapen and disorganized as it made landfall on the Big Island, and radar on the Big Island showed a highly asymmetric storm, with all of the heavy rains confined to the southeast side.

Hottest Reliably Measured Air Temperatures on Earth

By Christopher C. Burt
July 22, 2016

As Jeff Masters mentioned in his recent blog, a temperature of 54.0°C (129.2°F) was observed at Mitribah, Kuwait on July 21st. According to the Kuwait Meteorological Department this was the hottest temperature ever measured in the country (a reading of 54.4°C/129.9°F observed at the same site on July 16, 2010 has been disallowed as a result of a faulty sensor). The 54.0°C reading also is a new record for Asia and ties a similar reading at Death Valley (on June 30, 2013) as the hottest reliably measured temperature on Earth. The key word here is ‘reliably’. Many hotter temperatures have been reported from around the world in years past. However, all of these have credibility issues. In that vein I am going to revisit a blog I first posted on WU in October 2010 listing all the various claims to temperature readings at or above 54°C (129.2°F). In the years since I made that post I’ve learned more about some of these claims and have thus updated my entries and ‘validity’ scores as a result.

An extraordinary meteorological event; was one of its results a 1000-year flood?

By Stu Ostro
October 5, 2015

The confluence of meteorological ingredients the first weekend in October 2015 resulted in an extraordinary weather event with severe impacts. Was one of them a 1000-year flood?

Why the Arrest of a Science-Loving 14-year-old Matters

By Shaun Tanner
September 16, 2015

By now, many of you have heard or read about the arrest of Ahmed Mohamed, a 14-year-old high school student from Irving, Texas. Ahmed was arrested because school officials called the police after he showed one of his teachers his homemade clock. Mistaken for a bomb, Ahmed was taken into custody, interrogated, shamed, suspended (still on suspension today, Wednesday), and reprimanded. All of this after it has been found that the "device" he brought to school was indeed, a homemade clock.