Passenger Train Derailed by Landslide in Switzerland; 11 Injured

August 14, 2014

Days of heavy rainfall led to a landslide that derailed a passenger train Wednesday in the Swiss Alps, leaving 11 people injured and one train car dangling off a cliff, according to RT.com.

About 200 people were inside the train at the time of the incident, which occurred southeast of Zurich, Switzerland, between Tiefencastel and Solis. Five of the 11 injuries are considered serious, according to Graubuenden police spokeswoman Anita Senti.

As many as 10 people were inside the train carriage that was hanging off the cliff, RT.com added, but they were all safely rescued. Helicopters with an air rescue service helped with the recovery efforts, since the crash site was not close to a road.

(MORE: Nine-Foot Wall of Water Invades Nebraska Hospital)

By mid-afternoon, everyone had been evacuated from the train cars, with uninjured passengers taken to Tiefencastel and put on buses.

The train had set off from the ski resort of St. Moritz on a line that leads north to Chur, Graubuenden's administrative capital. It is operated by Rhaetische Bahn, which runs narrow-gauge routes in Switzerland's mountainous southeastern corner that are popular with tourists.

Switzerland's rail system is considered among the safest and most efficient in the world, despite the country's challenging terrain.

Accidents are rare, although in 2010 the popular Glacier Express tourist train derailed in the Alps in southern Switzerland, killing one person and injuring 42 others.

Information from the Associated Press was used in this report.

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