Massive Louisiana Sinkhole In More Trouble

December 30, 2013

Associated Press

In this Thursday, June 27, 2013 photo, a truck hauling dirt rides along a berm set up to contain an approximate 22-acre sinkhole in Bayou Corne, La. Neighbors in the town face a wrenching decision after the sinkhole opened up near their homes: Stay or go? (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

BAYOU CORNE, La. — A massive sinkhole in Bayou Corne, La. is in more trouble, after the level surrounding it cracked during a wave of underground micro-tremors. It's the second times in less than two months that the levee has cracked, Assumption Parish officials say.

It's in the same place the earth-and-limestone levee sank a bit and cracks developed in late October, The Advocate reported. Those were repaired.

The levee was built to keep the salty and sometimes oily water out of surrounding freshwater swamps after a salt dome cavern operated by Texas Brine Co. collapsed deep underground and the sinkhole developed in August 2012.

It's now oval, with growth zones moving northeast and southwest, toward Louisiana Highway 70 and the Bayou Corne waterway.

Texas Brine documents filed with the state Department of Natural Resources don't suggest the sinkhole will reach either. But they say it is edging closer to the southern levee just north of Bayou Corne.

John Boudreaux, director of the parish Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness, said Monday that a new hairline crack showed up Sunday at the site of the largest crack from October. That crack had been about a foot wide before it was repaired.

The new crack had spread from a few feet on the levee top on Sunday to all the way across it by Monday, he said.

(MORE: Sinkholes are Common in Florida)

A second crack has formed along the inner side of the southern levee where the previous round of tremors had caused the levee to sink. Its shape suggests a small section of levee top may slide into the sinkhole, Boudreaux said.

Since last week, micro-earthquakes have been increasing near the sinkhole and the failed Texas Brine cavern, halting work on the sinkhole and totaling 180 per day by Sunday.

Texas Brine told DNR earlier this month the company plans to keep maintaining the levee with fresh material after cracking or subsidence happens. Company officials have also pointed out the sinkhole is moving toward stabilization, though the timeframe for that remains uncertain.

MORE: Crazy Sinkhole Photos

Workers prepare to pull vehicles from a sinkhole that opened up on a residential street in the South Deering neighborhood on April 18, 2013 in Chicago, Ill. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

 

 


Ad Blocker Enabled

Featured Blogs

Little Change to 99L in The Bahamas; 91L Headed Towards North Carolina

By Dr. Jeff Masters
August 27, 2016

There is little new to say about the saga of tropical wave Invest 99L, which continued to chug west-northwest at 10 mph through the northwestern Bahamas on Saturday morning towards South Florida and the Florida Keys. Satellite loops late Saturday morning showed little change in the storm’s organization and heavy thunderstorms since yesterday; 99L still lacked a well-organized surface circulation center and the amount of heavy thunderstorm activity was modest at best.

Hottest Reliably Measured Air Temperatures on Earth: PART TWO

By Christopher C. Burt
August 19, 2016

In my previous blog I discussed the various contenders for what might be the hottest reliably measured air temperatures on Earth. That blog focused on those that were most likely not reliable for various reasons. In this blog I will briefly list those that I believe to be the most reliably measured. This takes into account such factors as climatology (general and specific to the sites at time of observation), properly exposed instrumentation, and good correspondence with other temperature observations in the vicinity of the record-breaking site(s).

An extraordinary meteorological event; was one of its results a 1000-year flood?

By Stu Ostro
October 5, 2015

The confluence of meteorological ingredients the first weekend in October 2015 resulted in an extraordinary weather event with severe impacts. Was one of them a 1000-year flood?

Why the Arrest of a Science-Loving 14-year-old Matters

By Shaun Tanner
September 16, 2015

By now, many of you have heard or read about the arrest of Ahmed Mohamed, a 14-year-old high school student from Irving, Texas. Ahmed was arrested because school officials called the police after he showed one of his teachers his homemade clock. Mistaken for a bomb, Ahmed was taken into custody, interrogated, shamed, suspended (still on suspension today, Wednesday), and reprimanded. All of this after it has been found that the "device" he brought to school was indeed, a homemade clock.