5 Cities With Wild Temperatures Swings to Start 2014

By Chris Dolce
Published: January 10, 2014

Rapid Weather Changes to Start 2014

For many cities in the East, rapidly changing temperatures have been a common theme during the start of 2014. The latest temperature swing will arrive this weekend with many cities climbing 10 to 20 degrees above average.

(MORE: January Thaw Follows Arctic Deep Freeze)

Starting with Boston below, let's take a look at a few of the rapid changes some cities have dealt with since Jan. 1.

Boston

Beantown has seen it all from heavy snow and frigid temperatures at the start of the month, to highs 20 degrees above average a few days later, and a return to frigid conditions shortly thereafter.

(Average High: 36 degrees | Average Low: 22 degrees)

  • Frigid (Jan 2, 3, 4): Low temperature of just 2 degrees on Jan. 2, 3, and 4. Winter Storm Hercules also left behind 15.1 inches of snow on Jan. 2-3. 
  • Mild (Jan. 6): High of 56 degrees at about 2:30 p.m. on Jan. 6. A 54-degree rise from the morning of Jan. 4
  • Frigid (Jan 7, 8): Temperature of 12 degrees about 18-hours later on Jan. 7 at 8:00 a.m. (total drop of 44 degrees). This was followed by a low of 7 degrees on the morning of Jan. 8.
  • Mild Forecast (Jan. 11): Highs in the 50s expected this weekend, though accompanied by rain. Temperatures remain above average into early next week.

(MORE: Boston Forecast)

Next> Massive Snow Melt


Ad Blocker Enabled

Featured Blogs

The Big Thompson Disaster: Reverberations of a Flash Flood, 40 Years Later

By Dr. Jeff Masters
July 29, 2016

What began as a celebratory Saturday in the mountains ended in tragedy 40 years ago this weekend, when a catastrophic flash flood ripped through the narrow Big Thompson Canyon of Colorado’s Front Range. A total of 144 people were killed on that Saturday evening, July 31, 1976--the eve of the 100th anniversary of Colorado’s statehood. critical gaps in weather data, communication, and public awareness had teamed up with a slow-moving deluge to create a true disaster, one that’s had a noteworthy influence on how we deal with flash floods today.

Hottest Reliably Measured Air Temperatures on Earth

By Christopher C. Burt
July 22, 2016

As Jeff Masters mentioned in his recent blog, a temperature of 54.0°C (129.2°F) was observed at Mitribah, Kuwait on July 21st. According to the Kuwait Meteorological Department this was the hottest temperature ever measured in the country (a reading of 54.4°C/129.9°F observed at the same site on July 16, 2010 has been disallowed as a result of a faulty sensor). The 54.0°C reading also is a new record for Asia and ties a similar reading at Death Valley (on June 30, 2013) as the hottest reliably measured temperature on Earth. The key word here is ‘reliably’. Many hotter temperatures have been reported from around the world in years past. However, all of these have credibility issues. In that vein I am going to revisit a blog I first posted on WU in October 2010 listing all the various claims to temperature readings at or above 54°C (129.2°F). In the years since I made that post I’ve learned more about some of these claims and have thus updated my entries and ‘validity’ scores as a result.

An extraordinary meteorological event; was one of its results a 1000-year flood?

By Stu Ostro
October 5, 2015

The confluence of meteorological ingredients the first weekend in October 2015 resulted in an extraordinary weather event with severe impacts. Was one of them a 1000-year flood?

Why the Arrest of a Science-Loving 14-year-old Matters

By Shaun Tanner
September 16, 2015

By now, many of you have heard or read about the arrest of Ahmed Mohamed, a 14-year-old high school student from Irving, Texas. Ahmed was arrested because school officials called the police after he showed one of his teachers his homemade clock. Mistaken for a bomb, Ahmed was taken into custody, interrogated, shamed, suspended (still on suspension today, Wednesday), and reprimanded. All of this after it has been found that the "device" he brought to school was indeed, a homemade clock.