Hood River, OR

3:47 AM PDT on October 22, 2017 (GMT -0700)
| | Change Station
Active Advisory: Flash Flood Watch Active Notice: Flash Flood Watch

Elev -9999 ft 0.00 °N, 0.00 °E | Updated 4 seconds ago

Rain
Rain
°F
Feels Like °F
N
Wind Variable Wind from North
Gusts mph

Today
High -- | Low -- °F
--% Chance of Precip.
Yesterday
High -- | Low -- °F
Precip. -- in
Pressure 29.88 in
Visibility 3.0 miles
Clouds Overcast 7000 ft
Dew Point Not available.
Humidity Not available.
Rainfall --
Snow Depth Not available.
7:32 AM 6:07 PM
Waxing Crescent, 7% visible
SPECI KDLS 221044Z AUTO 13004KT 3SM -RA BR OVC070 10/09 A2988 RMK AO2 P0010 T01000094
Pressure 29.88 in
Visibility 3.0 miles
Clouds Overcast 7000 ft
Dew Point Not available.
Humidity Not available.
Rainfall --
Snow Depth Not available.
7:32 AM 6:07 PM
Waxing Crescent, 7% visible
SPECI KDLS 221044Z AUTO 13004KT 3SM -RA BR OVC070 10/09 A2988 RMK AO2 P0010 T01000094

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10-Day Weather Forecast

Almanac

Astronomy

Oct. 22, 2017 Rise Set
Actual Time
Civil Twilight
Nautical Twilight
Astronomical Twilight
Moon
Length of Visible Light
Length of Day
Tomorrow will be .
, % of the Moon is Illuminated

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Category 6

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Air Quality

  Air Quality AQ Index Pollutant
Not available.

Snow Depth

Station Depth Elevation

Earthquake Activity

City Distance Mag. Time & Date
Minimum magnitude displayed is 2.5.

Coastal Water Temperatures

Place Temperature

Stations

Nearby Weather Stations

Station Location Temp. Windchill Dew Point Humidity Wind Precip. Elev Updated Type
                   

Watches & Warnings

Flash Flood Watch
Issued: 1:39 PM PDT Oct. 21, 2017 – National Weather Service

... Flash Flood Watch remains in effect through Sunday afternoon
for The Eagle creek burn area in the western and central Columbia
River gorge...


The Flash Flood Watch continues for

* a portion of northwest Oregon, including the following areas,
central Columbia River gorge and western Columbia River gorge.

* Through Sunday afternoon

* as of Saturday afternoon, rainfall rates are increasing in the
Columbia River gorge. 1 to 2 inches of rain are expected this
afternoon, with an additional 2 to 4 inches expected Saturday
evening through Saturday morning.

* Storm total rainfall for The Eagle creek burn area through
Sunday are forecasted to be 4 to 7 inches and could possibly
reach 8 or 9 inches in some areas of the burn. This could be
enough rainfall to cause debris-laden flash flooding.

Precautionary/preparedness actions...

A Flash Flood Watch means that conditions may develop that lead
to flash flooding. Flash flooding is a very dangerous situation.

You should monitor later forecasts and be prepared to take action
should flash flood warnings be issued.

Landslides and debris flows are also possible during this heavy
rain event. People, structures and roads located below steep
slopes, in canyons and near the mouths of canyons may be at
serious risk from rapidly moving landslides.

Monitor nearby streams, creeks and storm water drainages for
blockage or sudden rises. Signs that a flash flood or debris flow
may be imminent include: intense heavy rain and rapid increase in
water levels in creeks, possibly accompanied by increased
muddiness, a sudden decrease in creek water levels even though
rain is still occurring or has only recently stopped, a faint
rumbling sound or sound that increases in volume and sounds of
trees cracking or boulders knocking together.

Be aware that bursts of intense rainfall may be particularly
dangerous, especially after longer periods of moderate steady
rainfall. If you are in areas susceptible to landslides and
debris flows, consider leaving if it is safe to do so. Remember
that driving during an intense storm can be hazardous. If you
remain at home, move to a second story if possible. Staying out
of the path of a flash flood or debris flow saves lives.

Stay alert and awake. Many flash flood and debris flow fatalities
occur when people are sleeping. Watch roads for collapsed
pavement, mud, fallen rocks, and other indications of possible
flash floods or debris flows. Listen to a NOAA Weather Radio or
portable, battery-powered radio or television for warnings of
intense rainfall. If you observe or hear warning signs
immediately move out of the path to higher and stable ground,
inform affected neighbors and report to 9 1 1 and the National
Weather Service. If escape is not possible curl into a tight Ball
to protect your head. Do not drive across a flooded Road or into
shallow debris even though it may look passable.