New Featured Blogger - Mike Theiss

By: WunderYakuza , 6:20 PM GMT on March 01, 2007

I wanted to announce that we have a new featured blogger, Mike Theiss.

Mike's a pro storm chaser who will be sharing his photos and experiences with us this year.

Welcome Mike! I hope everyone enjoys the show.

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Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

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373. Tazmanian
8:52 PM GMT on March 21, 2007
your welcome lol
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
372. seflagamma
8:50 PM GMT on March 21, 2007
Hi Aaron,

Haven't popped in to just say HI in a long time. So decided it was time to give you a post and say Thanks for all you and your team do for us!!!!

Gams
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
371. Tazmanian
8:37 PM GMT on March 21, 2007
this is some in i like you to look in to aron it is poping up from time to time

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There was a problem opening this user's Wunder Blog files. Please try again later

it pop up on your blog has well aron a few days back
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370. Tazmanian
8:09 PM GMT on March 21, 2007
what dos aron like to do for fun?
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369. Tazmanian
8:07 PM GMT on March 21, 2007
dont make me put bares in her
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368. Tazmanian
8:07 PM GMT on March 21, 2007
i hop he dos not turn this in to aa 50 day with out updateing blog
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367. Tazmanian
8:05 PM GMT on March 21, 2007
weatherboykris he needs help
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366. weatherboykris
8:04 PM GMT on March 21, 2007
Put simply,he does alot of complex work.
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365. Tazmanian
8:02 PM GMT on March 21, 2007
weatherboykris cool thanks
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364. Tazmanian
8:02 PM GMT on March 21, 2007
ok
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363. weatherboykris
8:02 PM GMT on March 21, 2007
That's a job description for his job.
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362. weatherboykris
8:01 PM GMT on March 21, 2007
Nature of the Work [About this section] Back to Top

The rapid spread of computers and information technology has generated a need for highly trained workers proficient in various job functions. These workers—computer scientists, database administrators, and network systems and data communication analysts—include a wide range of computer specialists. Job tasks and occupational titles used to describe these workers evolve rapidly, reflecting new areas of specialization or changes in technology, as well as the preferences and practices of employers.

Computer scientists work as theorists, researchers, or inventors. Their jobs are distinguished by the higher level of theoretical expertise and innovation they apply to complex problems and the creation or application of new technology. Those employed by academic institutions work in areas ranging from complexity theory to hardware to programming-language design. Some work on multidisciplinary projects, such as developing and advancing uses of virtual reality, extending human-computer interaction, or designing robots. Their counterparts in private industry work in areas such as applying theory; developing specialized languages or information technologies; or designing programming tools, knowledge-based systems, or even computer games.

With the Internet and electronic business generating large volumes of data, there is a growing need to be able to store, manage, and extract data effectively. Database administrators work with database management systems software and determine ways to organize and store data. They identify user requirements, set up computer databases, and test and coordinate modifications to the computer database systems. An organization’s database administrator ensures the performance of the system, understands the platform on which the database runs, and adds new users to the system. Because they also may design and implement system security, database administrators often plan and coordinate security measures. With the volume of sensitive data generated every second growing rapidly, data integrity, backup systems, and database security have become increasingly important aspects of the job of database administrators.

Because networks are configured in many ways, network systems and data communications analysts are needed to design, test, and evaluate systems such as local area networks (LANs), wide area networks (WANs), the Internet, intranets, and other data communications systems. Systems can range from a connection between two offices in the same building to globally distributed networks, voice mail, and e-mail systems of a multinational organization. Network systems and data communications analysts perform network modeling, analysis, and planning; they also may research related products and make necessary hardware and software recommendations. Telecommunications specialists focus on the interaction between computer and communications equipment. These workers design voice and data communication systems, supervise the installation of the systems, and provide maintenance and other services to clients after the systems are installed.

The growth of the Internet and the expansion of the World Wide Web (the graphical portion of the Internet) have generated a variety of occupations related to the design, development, and maintenance of Web sites and their servers. For example, webmasters are responsible for all technical aspects of a Web site, including performance issues such as speed of access, and for approving the content of the site. Internet developers or Web developers, also called Web designers, are responsible for day-to-day site creation and design.



Working Conditions [About this section] Back to Top

Computer scientists and database administrators normally work in offices or laboratories in comfortable surroundings. They usually work about 40 hours a week—the same as many other professional or office workers do. However, evening or weekend work may be necessary to meet deadlines or solve specific problems. With the technology available today, telecommuting is common for computer professionals. As networks expand, more work can be done from remote locations through modems, laptops, electronic mail, and the Internet.

Like other workers who spend long periods in front of a computer terminal typing on a keyboard, computer scientists and database administrators are susceptible to eyestrain, back discomfort, and hand and wrist problems such as carpal tunnel syndrome or cumulative trauma disorder.



Training, Other Qualifications, and Advancement [About this section] Back to Top

Rapidly changing technology requires an increasing level of skill and education on the part of employees. Companies look for professionals with an ever-broader background and range of skills, including not only technical knowledge, but also communication and other interpersonal skills. While there is no universally accepted way to prepare for a job as a network systems analyst, computer scientist, or database administrator, most employers place a premium on some formal college education. A bachelor’s degree is a prerequisite for many jobs; however, some jobs may require only a 2-year degree. Relevant work experience also is very important. For more technically complex jobs, persons with graduate degrees are preferred.

For database administrator positions, many employers seek applicants who have a bachelor’s degree in computer science, information science, or management information systems (MIS). MIS programs usually are part of the business school or college and differ considerably from computer science programs, emphasizing business and management-oriented coursework and business computing courses. Employers increasingly seek individuals with a master’s degree in business administration (MBA), with a concentration in information systems, as more firms move their business to the Internet. For some network systems and data communication analysts, such as webmasters, an associate degree or certificate is sufficient, although more advanced positions might require a computer-related bachelor’s degree. For computer and information scientists, a doctoral degree generally is required because of the highly technical nature of their work.

Despite employers’ preference for those with technical degrees, persons with degrees in a variety of majors find employment in these occupations. The level of education and the type of training that employers require depend on their needs. One factor affecting these needs is changes in technology. Employers often scramble to find workers capable of implementing new technologies. Workers with formal education or experience in information security, for example, are in demand because of the growing need for their skills and services. Employers also look for workers skilled in wireless technologies as wireless networks and applications have spread into many firms and organizations.

Most community colleges and many independent technical institutes and proprietary schools offer an associate’s degree in computer science or a related information technology field. Many of these programs may be geared more toward meeting the needs of local businesses and are more occupation specific than are 4-year degree programs. Some jobs may be better suited to the level of training that such programs offer. Employers usually look for people who have broad knowledge and experience related to computer systems and technologies, strong problem-solving and analytical skills, and good interpersonal skills. Courses in computer science or systems design offer good preparation for a job in these computer occupations. For jobs in a business environment, employers usually want systems analysts to have business management or closely related skills, while a background in the physical sciences, applied mathematics, or engineering is preferred for work in scientifically oriented organizations. Art or graphic design skills may be desirable for webmasters or Web developers.

Jobseekers can enhance their employment opportunities by participating in internship or co-op programs offered through their schools. Because many people develop advanced computer skills in a noncomputer occupation and then transfer those skills to a computer occupation, a background in the industry in which the person’s job is located, such as financial services, banking, or accounting, can be important. Others have taken computer science courses to supplement their study in fields such as accounting, inventory control, or other business areas.

Computer scientists and database administrators must be able to think logically and have good communication skills. Because they often deal with a number of tasks simultaneously, the ability to concentrate and pay close attention to detail is important. Although these computer specialists sometimes work independently, they frequently work in teams on large projects. They must be able to communicate effectively with computer personnel, such as programmers and managers, as well as with users or other staff who may have no technical computer background.

Computer scientists employed in private industry may advance into managerial or project leadership positions. Those employed in academic institutions can become heads of research departments or published authorities in their field. Database administrators may advance into managerial positions, such as chief technology officer, on the basis of their experience managing data and enforcing security. Computer specialists with work experience and considerable expertise in a particular subject or a certain application may find lucrative opportunities as independent consultants or may choose to start their own computer consulting firms.

Technological advances come so rapidly in the computer field that continuous study is necessary to keep one’s skills up to date. Employers, hardware and software vendors, colleges and universities, and private training institutions offer continuing education. Additional training may come from professional development seminars offered by professional computing societies.

Certification is a way to demonstrate a level of competence in a particular field. Some product vendors or software firms offer certification and require professionals who work with their products to be certified. Many employers regard these certifications as the industry standard. For example, one method of acquiring enough knowledge to get a job as a database administrator is to become certified in a specific type of database management. Voluntary certification also is available through various organizations associated with computer specialists. Professional certification may afford a jobseeker a competitive advantage.



Employment [About this section] Back to Top

Computer scientists and database administrators held about 507,000 jobs in 2004, including about 66,000 who were self-employed. Employment was distributed among the detailed occupations as follows:

Network systems and data communication analysts 231,000
Database administrators 104,000
Computer and information scientists, research 22,000
Computer specialists, all other 149,000

Although they are increasingly employed in every sector of the economy, the greatest concentration of these workers is in the computer systems design and related services industry. Firms in this industry provide services related to the commercial use of computers on a contract basis, including custom computer programming services; computer systems integration design services; computer facilities management services, including computer systems or data processing facilities support services for clients; and other computer-related services, such as disaster recovery services and software installation. Many computer scientists and database administrators are employed by Internet service providers; Web search portals; and data processing, hosting, and related services firms. Others work for government, manufacturers of computer and electronic products, insurance companies, financial institutions, and universities.

A growing number of computer specialists, such as network and data communications analysts, are employed on a temporary or contract basis; many of these individuals are self-employed, working independently as contractors or consultants. For example, a company installing a new computer system may need the services of several network systems and data communication analysts just to get the system running. Because not all of the analysts would be needed once the system is functioning, the company might contract for such employees with a temporary help agency or a consulting firm or with the network systems analysts themselves. Such jobs may last from several months to 2 years or more. This growing practice enables companies to bring in people with the exact skills they need to complete a particular project, rather than having to spend time or money training or retraining existing workers. Often, experienced consultants then train a company’s in-house staff as a project develops.



Job Outlook [About this section] Back to Top

Computer scientists and database administrators should continue to enjoy favorable job prospects. As technology becomes more sophisticated and complex, however, employers demand a higher level of skill and expertise from their employees. Individuals with an advanced degree in computer science or computer engineering or with an MBA with a concentration in information systems should enjoy favorable employment prospects. College graduates with a bachelor’s degree in computer science, computer engineering, information science, or MIS also should enjoy favorable prospects, particularly if they have supplemented their formal education with practical experience. Because employers continue to seek computer specialists who can combine strong technical skills with good interpersonal and business skills, graduates with degrees in fields other than computer science who have had courses in computer programming, systems analysis, and other information technology areas also should continue to find jobs in these computer fields. In fact, individuals with the right experience and training can work in these computer occupations regardless of their college major or level of formal education.

Computer scientists and database administrators are expected to be among the fastest growing occupations through 2014. Employment of these computer specialists is expected to grow much faster than the average for all occupations as organizations continue to adopt and integrate increasingly sophisticated technologies. Job increases will be driven by very rapid growth in computer systems design and related services, which is projected to be one of the fastest growing industries in the U.S. economy. Job growth will not be as rapid as during the previous decade, however, as the information technology sector begins to mature and as routine work is increasingly outsourced overseas. In addition to growth, many job openings will arise annually from the need to replace workers who move into managerial positions or other occupations or who leave the labor force.

The demand for networking to facilitate the sharing of information, the expansion of client–server environments, and the need for computer specialists to use their knowledge and skills in a problem-solving capacity will be major factors in the rising demand for computer scientists and database administrators. Moreover, falling prices of computer hardware and software should continue to induce more businesses to expand their computerized operations and integrate new technologies into them. To maintain a competitive edge and operate more efficiently, firms will keep demanding computer specialists who are knowledgeable about the latest technologies and are able to apply them to meet the needs of businesses.

Increasingly, more sophisticated and complex technology is being implemented across all organizations, fueling demand for computer scientists and database administrators. There is growing demand for network systems and data communication analysts to help firms maximize their efficiency with available technology. Expansion of electronic commerce—doing business on the Internet—and the continuing need to build and maintain databases that store critical information on customers, inventory, and projects are fueling demand for database administrators familiar with the latest technology. Also, the increasing importance placed on cybersecurity—the protection of electronic information—will result in a need for workers skilled in information security.

The development of new technologies usually leads to demand for various kinds of workers. The expanding integration of Internet technologies into businesses, for example, has resulted in a growing need for specialists who can develop and support Internet and intranet applications. The growth of electronic commerce means that more establishments use the Internet to conduct their business online. The introduction of the wireless Internet, known as WiFi, creates new systems to be analyzed and new data to be administered. The spread of such new technologies translates into a need for information technology professionals who can help organizations use technology to communicate with employees, clients, and consumers. Explosive growth in these areas also is expected to fuel demand for specialists who are knowledgeable about network, data, and communications security.



Earnings [About this section] Back to Top

Median annual earnings of computer and information scientists, research, were $85,190 in May 2004. The middle 50 percent earned between $64,860 and $108,440. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $48,930, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $132,700. Median annual earnings of computer and information scientists employed in computer systems design and related services in May 2004 were $85,530.

Median annual earnings of database administrators were $60,650 in May 2004. The middle 50 percent earned between $44,490 and $81,140. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $33,380, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $97,450. In May 2004, median annual earnings of database administrators employed in computer systems design and related services were $70,530, and for those in management of companies and enterprises, earnings were $65,990.

Median annual earnings of network systems and data communication analysts were $60,600 in May 2004. The middle 50 percent earned between $46,480 and $78,060. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $36,260, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $95,040. Median annual earnings in the industries employing the largest numbers of network systems and data communications analysts in May 2004 are shown below:

Wired telecommunications carriers $65,130
Insurance carriers 64,660
Management of companies and enterprises 64,170
Computer systems design and related services 63,910
Local government 52,300


Median annual earnings of all other computer specialists were $59,480 in May 2004. Median annual earnings of all other computer specialists employed in computer systems design and related services were $57,430, and, for those in management of companies and enterprises, earnings were $68,590 in May 2004.

According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, starting offers for graduates with a doctoral degree in computer science averaged $93,050 in 2005. Starting offers averaged $50,820 for graduates with a bachelor’s degree in computer science; $46,189 for those with a degree in computer systems analysis; $44,417 for those with a degree in management information systems; and $44,775 for those with a degree in information sciences and systems.

According to Robert Half International, a firm providing specialized staffing services, starting salaries in 2005 ranged from $67,750 to $95,500 for database administrators. Salaries for networking and Internet-related occupations ranged from $47,000 to $68,500 for LAN administrators and from $51,750 to $74,520 for web developers. Starting salaries for information security professionals ranged from $63,750 to $93,000 in 2005.


Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
361. Tazmanian
8:00 PM GMT on March 21, 2007
ok i want to no how the new designsare comeing a long like a update on that
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
360. weatherboykris
7:55 PM GMT on March 21, 2007
Taz,trust me.He designs websites.He's extremely busy.
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359. Tazmanian
7:50 PM GMT on March 21, 2007
very busy with what you think what dos my aron do all day at work?
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358. Tazmanian
7:50 PM GMT on March 21, 2007
i love this blog
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
356. weatherboykris
7:46 PM GMT on March 21, 2007
I hope he writes an entry about that as well,Taz.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
355. Tazmanian
7:45 PM GMT on March 21, 2007
i no what you could do aron why not do a Open Request Entry blog for now in tell you can find time to up date us with some in new
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
354. Tazmanian
6:02 PM GMT on March 21, 2007
hello aron
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353. Tazmanian
4:39 AM GMT on March 21, 2007
hello aron when are we evere going to see a new blog update any time soon you can talk about the new chang that are comeing to the site and the blogs and went us no about any new toys


could we see some kind of a new blog update from you aron this a little some some in by the way this weekend is my B day its on the 24th i will be haveing a blog party on my blog and i would like you to come to it aron if you can
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
352. Tazmanian
2:49 AM GMT on March 21, 2007
what did the blog list look like befor it was changed?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
350. BANGORWALKER
2:26 AM GMT on March 21, 2007
Hey Aaron I hope all is well. I just noticed that every once in a while when I refresh the blog title page they are all "centered". I mean the names and titles are centered but not every time I refresh. Most of the time they are "far right" if you know what I mean. Is this a new feature or is something going kablooey with my computer? No need for a quick response since this isn't really a problem but I was just wondering. Thanks for all the great work you all do!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
349. Tazmanian
9:30 PM GMT on March 20, 2007
hello


by the way aron i like the new RSS Feed page will the blogs be lookikng like that too?
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348. Tazmanian
8:37 PM GMT on March 20, 2007
how about view so that way you can see how mean are viewing your blog
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346. cajunkid
8:07 PM GMT on March 20, 2007
could we get a "jump to the bottom" button for viewing blogs? I know we have the option to view newest first, but I'm lazy and like to read from top to bottom in descending order
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
345. ScarlettOHara
4:59 PM GMT on March 20, 2007
Suggestion Aaron ... try one of these:



It's gotta be 5:00 O'Clock Somewhere .... LOL


(warning --- do not mix heavily with Ric's aspirin ....)
Have a great day!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
344. Tazmanian
4:54 PM GMT on March 20, 2007
oh aron are we going to see a new blog her soon? 13 days going on 14s with out updateing i hop this is not going to this blog is not going to turn in to a 50 day with out updateing like the last one
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
343. Madrid
4:13 PM GMT on March 20, 2007
Ric

LMAO. I think he needs the whole bottle !!!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
342. ricderr
3:53 PM GMT on March 20, 2007
1
take two..they're small
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341. Tazmanian
3:50 PM GMT on March 20, 2007
aron when will you start working on the major design changes for the blogs are you working on it right now?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
340. Madrid
3:38 PM GMT on March 20, 2007
Thank Aaron. You are a hero!!!!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
339. WunderYakuza (Admin)
3:37 PM GMT on March 20, 2007
Tazmanian - He enjoys his non-blog life, and is too busy to really blog anyway. :)

Madrid2 - Done!
338. Madrid2
2:03 PM GMT on March 20, 2007
Good morning Aaron.

This is Madrid from my second blog Madrid2
Thank you for your help yesterday. I have no problems in adding links now. It is a pitty that the HTML weather sticker messes up everything since it is the only one that alerts on weather warnings. Any way! the links are more useful for others.

Now, since life is never perfect, my Madrid2 blog has the same weather sticker and hence the same problem. I would imagine that you are the only one that can remove it again so I can add helpfull links. Would you please do it? Thank you, I know how busy you are and if I would have known that it made this, I would have not added it to my blog.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
337. Tazmanian
1:15 AM GMT on March 20, 2007
by the way why is thelonious not up on the Featured Blogs????? and when do you start working on the major design changes for the blogs are you working on that right now ??? and what have been done to new blog design so far any new toy add to them???
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
336. Tazmanian
1:11 AM GMT on March 20, 2007
aron make a new blog and tell us all about it
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
335. WunderYakuza (Admin)
1:10 AM GMT on March 20, 2007
Madrid - Oops! Sorry, I didn't notice that it messed up your Modify Profile page. HTML in the title is sort of a double edged sword, I didn't intend for it to be there, but some crafty folks had worked it in anyway, sometimes to good effect sometimes not. You should be wary of it. Either way, you should be able to add links now.

jajuvera - Thanks! I can't take credit for it, but for one small portion. It was primarily the efforts of thelonious. Keep your eyes open for more of this as we are improving the site piece by piece.
334. jajuvera
1:02 AM GMT on March 20, 2007
Thanks for the new history template Aaron, it makes me feel happy specially when it's a visual change.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
333. Madrid
11:14 PM GMT on March 19, 2007
Aaron,

I saw that my weather sticker in the title is of HTML type. Is that what it is messing up my links? If it is, I have tried to remove it without success. The page gets idle again and never updates.

How can I correct this?

Thank you.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
332. Tazmanian
8:30 PM GMT on March 19, 2007
what i mean is evere time you make a commet your Points go up
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331. Tazmanian
8:26 PM GMT on March 19, 2007
Posts:6
Points:200


i wish the blogs where like this you can have point for evere commet you make
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
330. Tazmanian
8:05 PM GMT on March 19, 2007
aron this said that We don't support that HTML her you have to take it out
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329. Madrid
8:03 PM GMT on March 19, 2007
Aaron. Here is the internet illitarate and dumb Madrid back.

I checked my Title and I don't see an HTML anywhere. Also searched the Help for a messup like that and it returns 0 entries.

Would you mind to help me?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
328. Damon85013
7:54 PM GMT on March 19, 2007
You roc.
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327. Madrid
7:52 PM GMT on March 19, 2007
Thank you so much Aaron. I will look into that.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
325. WunderYakuza (Admin)
7:44 PM GMT on March 19, 2007
Damon85013 - It's repaired.

Madrid - You have HTML in your title which is messing up the link entry page. We don't support that HTML, so you'll need to remove it from the title and put it in your entry or comments instead in order to add links.

Harls11 - You should report this to support@wunderground.com

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Aaron is a Software Developer for the Weather Underground, and the creator of the Wunder Blogs.

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