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IPCC: Climate Change Increasing Risk of Hunger, Thirst, Disease, Refugees, and War

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 11:42 AM GMT on March 31, 2014

Climate change is already having "widespread impacts", and has the potential to worsen global hunger, water availability, disease, drought, flooding, refugees, and war in the coming decades if we do nothing to reduce it, said the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) today, in the latest installment of their once-every-seven-year report on the climate. Today's report on climate change impacts and how we can adapt to them warned that "throughout the 21st century, climate-change impacts are projected to slow down economic growth, make poverty reduction more difficult, further erode food security, and prolong existing and create new poverty traps." Today's report by the Nobel-prize winning group of scientists was the second of four parts. Part 1, released in September 2013, covered the physical science behind climate change. Part 3 (due out in mid-April, 2014) will discuss how we can mitigate (reduce) climate change impacts. Part 4 (due out in early November, 2014) will present a grand summary of Parts 1, 2, and 3. Some key themes from today's report:

Food supplies will tighten. To me, the most important finding of the report is the climate change's threat to reduce global food supplies, which have already been negatively impacted, and are at risk to get much worse: “Based on many studies covering a wide range of regions and crops, negative impacts of climate change on crop yields have been more common than positive impacts. Climate change has negatively affected wheat and maize (corn) yields for many regions and in the global aggregate." For the future, the report acknowledges that some areas will likely see increases in food production, due to increased CO2 in the air and more favorable precipitation, but the overall global trend in food supplies will likely be downward (Figure 1.) This downward trend in yields will occur in the face of rapidly increasing demand, as the population grows by 2 billion, resulting in "increased likelihood of under-nutrition resulting from diminished food production in poor regions."


Figure 1. Summary of projected changes in crop yields, due to climate change over the 21st century. The figure includes projections for different emission scenarios, for tropical and temperate regions, and for adaptation and no-adaptation cases combined. Over the period 2010 - 2029, about as many scenarios predict an increase in global crop yields as predict a decrease. However, beyond 2030, more than twice as many scenarios predict a decrease versus an increase. Relatively few studies have considered impacts on cropping systems for scenarios where global mean temperatures increase by 4°C or more. For five time frames in the near-term and long-term, data (n=1090) are plotted in the 20-year period on the horizontal axis that includes the midpoint of each future projection period. Changes in crop yields are relative to late-20th-century levels. Data for each time frame sum to 100%. Image credit: IPCC.

Water availability to people will decrease, as wet areas get wetter and dry areas get drier. Not only does climate change pose huge risks to our food supply, it also threatens water availability. “The fraction of global population experiencing water scarcity and the fraction affected by major river floods increase with the level of warming in the 21st century.”

We're not adapting fast enough to avoid serious damage. The report talks about "adaptation deficits", as demonstrated by our relatively poor ability to respond to impacts from from recent extreme climatic events. "Climate-change-related risks from extreme events, such as heat waves, extreme precipitation, and coastal flooding, are already moderate (high confidence) and high with 1°C additional warming (medium confidence)." IPCC author and Princeton Professor Michael Oppenheimer put it more succinctly to the Associated Press: “We’re all sitting ducks.”

Poor people are most at risk from climate change. Climate-related hazards constitute an additional burden to people living in poverty, acting as a threat multiplier.

Climate change increases the risk of violence. For the first time, the IPCC lays out the case that climate change can add a destabilizing factor that can make violence more likely in countries with social and economic inequalities. "Climate change can indirectly increase risks of violent conflicts in the form of civil war and inter-group violence by amplifying well-documented drivers of these conflicts such as poverty and economic shocks."

Climate change increases the risk of more refugees. "Displacement risk increases when populations that lack the resources for planned migration experience higher exposure to extreme weather events."

Climate change will be costly. Though the uncertainties are high, the costs for an additional 2°C rise in temperature are thought to be between 0.2 and 2.0% of global GDP. "Losses are more likely than not to be greater, rather than smaller, than this range, since it is difficult to account for catastrophic changes, tipping points, and many other factors."

Human health will suffer. "Throughout the 21st century, climate change is expected to lead to increases in ill-health in many regions and especially in developing countries with low income…the magnitude and severity of negative impacts are projected to increasingly outweigh positive impacts. Examples include greater likelihood of injury, disease, and death due to more intense heat waves and fires; increased likelihood of under-nutrition resulting from diminished food production in poor regions; risks from lost work capacity and reduced labor productivity in vulnerable populations; and increased risks from food- and water-borne diseases and vector-borne diseases" (like malaria.)

We can take action to reduce these substantial risks. "Mitigation is considered essential for managing the risks of climate change." Mitigation refers to human actions to reduce climate change. Burning fewer fossil fuels and thus putting less CO2 in the air is essential to mitigating climate change. We should view the next few decades as the era of ‘climate responsibility’, when we can make a huge difference to keep our future climate livable. The report emphasizes that if greenhouse gases continue to rise, the world can expect an additional 6 - 7°F (3.5 - 4°C) of warming by 2100, instead of the international goal of keeping this rise less than 2°F (1.2°C). Princeton's Dr. Oppenheimer compared these two choices as "the difference between driving on an icy road at 30 mph versus 90 mph. It's risky at 30, but deadly at 90." Uncertainty is not a reason to delay climate action, and it is cheaper to act now on climate change than to delay. The International Energy Agency said in 2013 that in order to keep global warming less than 2°C above pre-industrial levels, "Delaying stronger climate action until 2020 would avoid $1.5 trillion in low-carbon investments up to that point, but an additional $5 trillion would then need to be invested through to 2035 to get back on track." The latest IPCC findings will be a key discussion topic for world leaders at a September 23, 2014 Climate Summit in New York City, hosted by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. The summit aims to mobilize political will to pave the way for an ambitious global legal climate agreement to be signed at the critical December 2015 Conference of Parties (COP) negotiations in Paris.

Links
Associated Press coverage of the IPCC Part 2 report.

New Blockbuster IPCC Climate Report: Comprehensive, Authoritative, Conservative, my September 2013 post on who the IPCC is, and how they write their reports.

Landmark 2013 IPCC Report: 95% Chance Most of Global Warming is Human-Caused, my September 2013 post on Part I of the 2013 - 2014 IPCC report.


Video 1. The IPCC released this video to accompany today's release of their 2014 Impacts and Adaptation report.

Jeff Masters


The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

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Quoting 672. georgevandenberghe:



We need to mandate wearing white or very light colored business suits
for the same reason. Painting roads white with black lane markers would be even more helpful.


Also, polishing a bald heat greatly increases albedo. Laws need to be passed to make this compulsory.
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Quoting 672. georgevandenberghe:



We need to mandate wearing white or very light colored business suits
for the same reason. Painting roads white with black lane markers would be even more helpful.



I believe Dr. Masters spoke about that once but the cost to do it would just be so incredibly high that it would never be done.
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Quoting 665. yonzabam:


Bald people have a higher albedo than people with hair. That helps to cool the planet.



We need to mandate wearing white or very light colored business suits
for the same reason. Painting roads white with black lane markers would be even more helpful.
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Quoting JeffMasters:
Leaked IPCC stunner: Going bald slashes your carbon footprint, offsets Arctic ice loss


Jeff Masters


BAH !!

I feel marginalised again……..
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NWS Norman ‏@NWSNorman 3h

We just briefed 125 of our public safety, emergency management and media partners about the severe weather threat. We're ready - are you?

NWS Norman Briefing Youtube
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Jayson Prentice ‏@SeverePlains 1h

Analogs to 12z NAM show increased severe weather risk along warm front, likely south of I-70 in e KS & MO tomorrow: pic.twitter.com/AnMMnFrXyU

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day 2


day 3


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Solar hat for that Green Look this Summer.




mini portable solar energy charger for mobile phone


Hat mini portable solar energy charger for mobile phone
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DATE/TIME LAT LON CLASSIFICATION STORM
01/0815 UTC 3.7S 61.2W OVERLAND 90Q
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Quoting 660. JeffMasters:
Leaked IPCC stunner: Going bald slashes your carbon footprint, offsets Arctic ice loss


Jeff Masters


Bald people have a higher albedo than people with hair. That helps to cool the planet.
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funded independently by Gillette and Schick — found that if every adult male in the world shaved his head regularly (or at least the ones who aren’t blond did), it would entirely offset the enhanced warming from Arctic sea ice loss.

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Dr. Forbes updated Torcon Index:

Wednesday, April 2

Scattered severe thunderstorms in central and south MO, south IL, west KY, extreme southwest IN, north and west AR, southeast and east-central KS, southwest, central, and east OK, north-central and northeast TX.

TOR:CON:
AR north, west - 3
IL south - 3
IN extreme southwest - 3
KS southeast, south-central, east-central - 5
KY west - 3
MO central, south - 5
OK southwest, central, northeast - 4
OK southeast - 3
TX north-central, northeast - 3
other areas - 1 or less
Thursday, April 3

Severe thunderstorm and tornado outbreak likely in extreme southeast KS, MO, south and central IL, south half IN, west half KY, west TN, northwest MS, north and west LA, east TX from I-35 east and south to San Antonio and Galveston, east OK.

TOR:CON:
AR west - 4
AR east - 3 to 4
IL west-central - 5
IL east-central, south - 3 to 4
IN south half - 3 to 4
KS extreme southeast - 3 to 4
KY west half - 3 to 4
LA north, west - 3 to 4
MO east half - 5
MO west half - 3 to 4
MS northwest - 3 to 4
OK east - 4
TN west - 3 to 4
TX northeast - 4
TX rest of area east of I-35, north of San Antonio and Galveston - 3 to 4
other areas - 1 or less
Friday, April 4

Isolated to scattered severe thunderstorms in east IN, OH, western PA, WV, central and east KY, middle and east TN, western VA, west NC, northwest SC, north and west GA, AL, northeast, central and south MS, southeast LA, west FL panhandle. TOR:CON - 3 southwest PA, north WV; 2 to 3 rest of area.
Saturday, April 5

A chance of a morning marginally severe thunderstorm in coastal NC, coastal SC. Isolated severe thunderstorms in southeast GA, northeast FL. Isolated severe thunderstorms in the TX panhandle. TOR:CON - less than 2.
Sunday, April 6

Isolated severe thunderstorms in east TX (from I-35 east), south LA, south MS. TOR:CON - 3 east TX.
Monday, April 7

A chance of an isolated severe thunderstorm in central and east GA, central and east SC, east NC, FL panhandle. TOR:CON - less than 2.
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Leaked IPCC stunner: Going bald slashes your carbon footprint, offsets Arctic ice loss


Jeff Masters







oh yeah......i'm doing my part!!!!!
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Quoting 648. georgevandenberghe:


Go back to April 2007 for a recent precedent.
Yep..Everything bloomed early that year with a very warm March. Then the Arctic air moved in and turned the Cumberland Plateau from green to gray brown.
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Omar 2008
Earl 2010
Rafael 2012

2014 ? lol
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658. JeffMasters (Admin)
Quoting 641. biff4ugo:
Awww, I'm bummed Jeff hasn't posted an April Fools Blog! I guess the new owners aren't down with that. Oh well, back to harvesting my spaghetti trees.


I did put together a 'Fools post, but decided to hang onto it for next week, when I'll likely need some "canned" material while I take my daughter's Spring Break week off...

Jeff Masters
About cyclone Hellen and its damage to Madagascar: Somehow difficult to find informations, and those you find are in French. Overall, apparently it wasn't that bad as it could have been. Nevertheless, off Soalala some fishermen drowned and more are missing since their boat capsized when the storm still was appraoching. Moreover, quoting this article with some help of google translator: "Of all affected districts, an initial assessment reported 1,004 victims (affected people, I guess), 919 homeless, 176 homes (huts) destroyed, 97 homes flooded, 1 administrative building disheveled, 1 Public Primary School (EPP) disheveled, 1 damaged EPP, 3962 ha of paddy fields and 112 ha of crops fields flooded, 6 posts Jirama (EDF equivalent ???) damaged, 1 dam damaged, 10 boats disappeared."

Photogallery of some damage and flooding here, f.e. this one from Mahajanga where daily life already resumed:



Edit: And here a video with happy music playing:

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Quoting 649. hydrus:
I think the GFS threw a chip...


I cant do winter anymore..I'm enjoying the spring this week..
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Quoting 568. StormTrackerScott:
JB has some interesting thoughts about this years hurricane season. 8 to 10 named storms, 3 to 5 hurricanes, and 1 to 2 majors. JB thinks FL to Maine maybe in trouble this year as storms should form close to home which I tend to agree. He also thinks this years hurricane season could mimic the 1950's and 1960's which featured numerous hurricane hits on FL, NC, and New England those decades.

Very interesting and I tend to agree with his reasoning here.


Although overall numbers were low we had many significant hits on the eastern seaboard those years.

Could see something like this, this year. Hurricane
Donna had hurricane force winds from FL to Maine which is something we haven't seen since.




Donna also DESTROYED the N Leewards... as a category 4 (down from a cat 5).



Weak seasons can be bad. Lol, however I'm wondering how was 1960 in terms of rainfall in my area xD
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Quoting 651. StormTrackerScott:


It's a bad April fools joke I'm sure for many across the US.
I hope its a joke. Everything is starting to bloom. If it gets to cold for to long, it reduces the full and lush foliage that normally would occur....Which is a bummer...to me..:)
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Nature.."These fools thought winter was over.lol.Look at them enjoying the warmth.We'll see about that next week."
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Quoting 642. Bluestorm5:


My friend was just in USVI a week ago and shared many amazing pictures with me. You live in such an amazing area of this planet :)


I have to agree with you on that! Anywhere you live has its ups and downs but I think the ups far outnumber the downs over here. :-)

Lindy
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Quoting 649. hydrus:
I think the GFS threw a chip...


It's a bad April fools joke I'm sure for many across the US.
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Couldnt get a much better set up for a major spring freeze..
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Quoting 647. StormTrackerScott:


Canadian has the 540 line down to New Orleans.
I think the GFS threw a chip...
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Quoting 640. hydrus:
Greetings VR. Many folks in the U.S. have had enough of winter. This late freeze, if it materializes, will have a definite effect on the agricultural industry.


Go back to April 2007 for a recent precedent.
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Quoting 646. VR46L:


Yes it does not look good , for much of Agriculture


Canadian has the 540 line down to New Orleans.
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646. VR46L
Quoting 640. hydrus:
Greeting VR. Many folks in the U.S. have had enough of winter. This late freeze, if it materializes, will have a definite effect on the agricultural industry.


Yes it does not look good , for much of Agriculture
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645. VR46L
Quoting 641. biff4ugo:
Awww, I'm bummed Jeff hasn't posted an April Fools Blog! I guess the new owners aren't down with that. Oh well, back to harvesting my spaghetti trees.


My favourite April fool prank ... God bless Panorama !
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Yer assumption is way off the scale/mark.

Dr. Masters has complete control over his entry content.

Just like any Blogging community member does.



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Decent return flow with this next system
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Quoting 622. VirginIslandsVisitor:
Good afternoon

It's a beautiful 84, feeling like 90, partly cloudy day here on the island.

I spent the weekend camping on Water Island. Had amazing weather, good friends and way too much partying. Had some fun learning a new craft and thought I'd show you my version of what I call the "Virgin Islands 'Coconut Express'"

The Virgin Islands Coconut Express!

Hope all is well with everyone!

Lindy



My friend was just in USVI a week ago and shared many amazing pictures with me. You live in such an amazing area of this planet :)
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Awww, I'm bummed Jeff hasn't posted an April Fools Blog! I guess the new owners aren't down with that. Oh well, back to harvesting my spaghetti trees.
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Quoting 634. VR46L:


I don't think so

So Sorry Hydrus ... been a long winter for you






Greetings VR. Many folks in the U.S. have had enough of winter. This late freeze, if it materializes, will have a definite effect on the agricultural industry.
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Here's the article I read by the USGS.

Why have these glaciers been shrinking? One factor is snowfall. We don%u2019t have weather measurements from the peak until very recently, but scientists have reconstructed a general picture. In the 1880s, the East African climate became much drier. Glaciers started shrinking, and lake levels started dropping. And since the early 1900s, at three weather stations on Kilimanjaro%u2019s southern foothills, rainfall has decreased by 27 to 39 percent. Glaciers need fresh snow for at least two reasons: to feed them with fresh ice and to provide a bright white shield between the ice and the sun.

Sunshine can melt ice even when the ambient air temperature is below freezing, by warming the surface of the ice. The same decrease in clouds that meant less snow for the glaciers also meant more sunshine. Even in 2000%u20132002, as scientists witnessed %u201Cstrong melting%u201D on Kilimanjaro, weather stations verified that the temperature never exceeded %u20131.6 degrees C. The glaciers%u2019 sharp edges and vertical walls (2) (3) also suggest that the melting is from sunshine, not above-freezing air temperatures. Warm air is a %u201Crounder,%u201D melting evenly everywhere; sunshine is a %u201Csharpener%u201D that strikes selectively. Clear and cloudy seasons, solstices and equinoxes, and afternoon cloudiness all affect where the sun hits the ice.

Sunshine can also remove ice at temperatures below freezing through sublimation. Sublimation is the mysterious process by which ice %u201Cevaporates%u201D directly into water vapor without first passing through a liquid phase. It takes 8.5 times as much energy to sublimate ice than to melt it, but recent experiments suggest that a substantial portion of the ice loss on Kilimanjaro%u2014perhaps two-thirds%u2014is through sublimation. Because sublimation is sensitive to humidity, the shift to drier air favored it at the expense of melting, a more energy-efficient mode of ice loss. Thus, dry weather strips a glacier of its protective shade and snow only to draw out its resulting death like an inefficient James Bond villain.

A number of scientists have concluded that snow and sun were the initial, and the largest overall, factors in the retreat of these glaciers. The difficult question is what effect the local air temperature also had. And as with snowfall and sunshine, temperature records were not kept at Kilimanjaro%u2019s peak. Over East Africa generally, there is no evidence of a temperature shift in the late 1800s, but over the 20th century surface warming did occur. At a station in Kilimanjaro%u2019s northern foothills, the average daily high temperature has risen since 1976. And for the upper atmosphere near Kilimanjaro, calculations indicate warming at most heights since midcentury, but no trend at the peak%u2019s approximate elevation. Some kind of midcentury change is suggested by the apparent timing of the glaciers%u2019 vertical decline. On Mount Kenya, which is 200 miles north and 2,200 feet lower, studies have concluded that through the 1900s, warming became a greater cause for shrinking of the Lewis Glacier, and eventually its retreat pattern was unrelated to sun exposure.

Those who have studied Kilimanjaro%u2019s glaciers agree that more research is necessary. They also agree that the Earth is warming, whether or not Kilimanjaro is good evidence for it. %u201CWe are entirely against the black-and-white picture that says it is either global warming or not global warming,%u201D said one scientist (Revkin, 2004).


http://earthshots.usgs.gov/earthshots/Mount-Kilim anjaro#ad-image-9
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Quoting 603. KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
the canary in the cage is Greenland

Is it ever..I have been doing some math on this subject, not finished with it yet tho. So far it has been at the very least- concerning. Within the next 75 years it will be more than alarming. It would take some global atmospheric phenomenon to stop the exponential melting that is present.
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Pretty active weather week ahead.

A strong capping inversion should hold across the central Plains today. We may see a lone supercell along the Red River this evening, capable of producing some large hail.

Tomorrow looks more impressive, but once again, a strong cap will hold for most of the day. It should break by mid-afternoon, allowing for the development of supercells in an environment of 2500-3000 j/kg SBCAPE, dewpoints in the 60s, and a sufficiently sheared environment. We may see a few tornadoes across central Oklahoma tomorrow. Elevated storms capable of producing hail will exist in Kansas-Missouri.

We'll have to see how Thursday turns out. Model differences are pretty big at this point, but the SPC seems pretty confident in a severe weather/tornado outbreak, noting that "portions of this area may need to be included in a moderate risk in later outlooks".
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636. VR46L
Quoting 629. PedleyCA:


Apparently so, first to mention it, I wunder(sic) if that is their Aprils Fools Joke.


Now you have got to be kidding ...
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Quoting 630. FallingBarometer:


Kilimanjaro has also seen an increase in volcanic activity since the late 90s.


Here's the CNN article I read. It's just one of several articles I've read recently. I've been interested in Kilimanjaro since I was a kid.

(CNN) -- The ice and snow that cap majestic Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania are vanishing before our eyes.

If current conditions persist, climate change experts say, Kilimanjaro's world-renowned glaciers, which have covered Africa's highest peak for centuries, will be gone within the next two decades.

"In a very real sense, these glaciers are being decapitated from the surface down," said Lonnie Thompson, professor of earth sciences at Ohio State University. Thompson is co-author of a study on Kilimanjaro published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The study's authors blame the disappearing ice on increases in global temperatures and diminished snowfall at Kilimanjaro's summit.

Previous studies of Kilimanjaro's glaciers have relied on aerial photographs to measure the rate of the retreating ice. For this new survey, scientists climbed the mountain and drilled deep into the glaciers to measure the volume of the ice fields atop the 19,331-foot (5,892-meter) peak.

The ice sheet that capped Kilimanjaro in 2007 was 85 percent smaller than the one that covered its plateau in 1912, paleoclimatologists explained in the study.

The mountain's ice cover shrank about 1 percent a year from 1912 to 1953, a rate that has accelerated in recent years. From 1989 to 2007, that rate jumped to 2.5 percent a year. Since 2000, the plateau's three remaining ice fields have shrunk by 26 percent, scientists found.

Thompson and his team of researchers have spent seven years measuring the glaciers of Kilimanjaro, whose snow-capped profile rises dramatically over the surrounding tropical plains.

Using 110 "porters," or local residents, they carried 6 tons of equipment to the mountain's plateau. Battling temperatures as low as 35 degrees below zero, and with very little oxygen, Thompson and his crew lived atop Kilimanjaro for nearly two months, drilling and collecting core ice samples buried thousands of feet below the glaciers' surface.

The new data shows that both the Northern and Southern ice fields atop Kilimanjaro have thinned dramatically in recent years, while the smaller Furtwangler Glacier shrank as much as 50 percent between 2000 and 2009.

As the glaciers break up into smaller pieces, more of the darker surface of the crater is exposed. This causes temperatures to rise on the mountain and accelerates the melting of the ice, scientists say.

"The shrinkage and ultimate disappearance of these glaciers will create tremendous ecological and social problems in the near future," said Doug Hardy, senior research fellow in the Climate Systems Research Center at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Hardy contributed research to the new study.

"The Kilimanjaro glaciers are indicators for a larger-scale process," Thompson said. "It's not just Kilimanjaro, it's every tropical glacier in Africa, in the tropical Andes of South America, it's the glaciers in New Guinea. We are losing all those glaciers in today's world."

A snowless Mount Kilimanjaro also could have economic effects.

Kilimanjaro is a tourist attraction and a crucial revenue generator for Tanzania, one of the world's poorest counties. A study published by the Overseas Development Institute in January estimated that 35,000 to 40,000 people visit Kilimanjaro every year, spending almost $50 million annually in the country.
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634. VR46L
Quoting 628. hydrus:
This is a joke...I think...


I don't think so

So Sorry Hydrus ... been a long winter for you






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Quoting 625. WDEmobmet:
Am i the only that noticed that the WU logo/link at the top left of the page has been modified. The cloud has been tilted on edge. WU has their "SWAG" on
It's for April fools day.
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Quoting 619. Andrebrooks:
Yep an El Nino is almost here.
Then we are in for a doosy...Hope folks in California and the N.W.South America will be prepared..Drought will be a huge factor for Australia and Indonesia.
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Floating houses to fight climate change in Holland
Deutsche Welle English, March 31, 2014
Rising sea levels caused by climate change are threatening coastal areas worldwide, today's IPCC report shows. Low-lying Netherlands is already getting prepared by building floating homes and redirecting rivers.
With a full cup of coffee in his hand, Willem Blokker heads up the two flights of stairs to his rooftop terrace. He turns to enjoy the view before settling down on a sofa. "Now do you understand why life just seems like a permanent holiday here?"
The 52-year-old Dutchman lives on one of 43 floating homes in this newly developed area of east Amsterdam, called Steigereiland. Just like a big yacht at dock, all of the houses are tied up to four mooring points. ...




Whole article see link above.
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Quoting 627. Sfloridacat5:
Cool picture of the Kilimanjaro glacier. It has been shrinking slowly since the 1800s.
I remember back 30 years ago when the shrinking glaciers on Kilimanjaro were already an issue.

In recent years the glacial decline has accelerated to 2.5% per year (based on National Geographic study done in 2007), which is an increase from 1% seen from 1912 - 1953.

The decline is reported to be due to a combination of effects including deforestation near the mountain causing decreases in precipitation and Global Warming.

At times during the year, the high elevations on the mountain can get very cold (well below 0), but if it doesn't snow the glacier will not be relenished.
So its a combination of factors causing glacial retreat including lack of precipitation at many locations around the world.






Kilimanjaro has also seen an increase in volcanic activity since the late 90s.
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Quoting 625. WDEmobmet:
Am i the only that noticed that the WU logo/link at the top left of the page has been modified. The cloud has been tilted on edge. WU has their "SWAG" on


Apparently so, first to mention it, I wunder(sic) if that is their Aprils Fools Joke.
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This is a joke...I think...
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Cool picture of the Kilimanjaro glacier. It has been shrinking slowly since the 1800s.
I remember back 30 years ago when the shrinking glaciers on Kilimanjaro were already an issue.

In recent years the glacial decline has accelerated to 2.5% per year (based on National Geographic study done in 2007), which is an increase from 1% seen from 1912 - 1953.

The decline is reported to be due to a combination of effects including deforestation near the mountain causing decreases in precipitation and Global Warming.

At times during the year, the high elevations on the mountain can get very cold (well below 0), but if it doesn't snow the glacier will not be relenished.
So its a combination of factors causing glacial retreat including lack of precipitation at many locations around the world.




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Quoting 580. pottery:


LOLOL, probably a bit of both.
And here I was thinking it was an Illusion.

Reality sucks.
Are you an April's Fool?! LOL
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Am i the only that noticed that the WU logo/link at the top left of the page has been modified. The cloud has been tilted on edge. WU has their "SWAG" on
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JeffMasters's Recent Photos

Mountain wave clouds over Labrador
Mountain wave clouds over Labrador
Mountain wave clouds over Labrador
Labrador ice