Massive flooding in Australia cuts off city of 75,000

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 1:52 PM GMT on January 03, 2011

The arrival of the new year has brought continued misery to northeast Australia, where unprecedented flooding continues in the wake of weeks of torrential rains. The floods have killed at least ten people and covered an area the size of France and Germany combined, cutting off the coastal city of Rockhampton. Today, the military was forced to fly in food, water, and other supplies into Rockhampton, a city of 75,000, due to the lack of unflooded roads into the city. The local airport, all access roads, and all rail lines into the city are closed. The flooding has affected at least 21 other towns, and 200,000 people in northeast Australia. Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard stated last week, "Some communities are seeing flood waters higher than they've seen in decades, and for some communities flood waters have never reached these levels before [in] the time that we have been recording floods." According to the National Climatic Data Center, springtime in Australia (September - November) had precipitation 125% of normal--the wettest spring in the country since records began 111 years ago. Some sections of coastal Queensland received over 4 feet (1200 mm) of rain from September through November. Rainfall in Queensland and all of eastern Australia in December was the greatest on record, and the year 2010 was the rainiest year on record for Queensland. The heavy rains are due, in part, to the moderate to strong La Niña event that has been in place since July. The relatively warm waters that accumulate off the northeast coast of Australia during a La Niña typically cause heavy rains over Queensland.


Figure 1. Comparison of river conditions in Queensland from today to December 30, 2010. While some rivers have fallen below major flood stage, the Fitzroy River at Rockhampton is rising, and may peak at levels not seen since 1918 on Wednesday. Image credit: Australian Bureau of Meteorology.


Figure 2. Rainfall in Queensland, Australia for December, 2010. Image credit: Australian Bureau of Meteorology.

The rains over Queensland continued yesterday and today, with many of the flooded regions receiving 1/2 - 1 inch (about 12 - 25 mm) of rain. Total rainfall amounts in the flood region over the past month are generally in the 16 - 24 inch range (400 - 600 mm). Predicted rainfall amounts for the next two days in the flooded region are less than 1/2 inch (12 mm), which should allow for river levels to peak by Tuesday or Wednesday, then slowly fall. However, heavy rains are predicted to affect the area again by Thursday, and it may be several weeks before the summer rains ease enough to allow all of Queensland's rivers to retreat below flood stage. Damage to infrastructure in Australia has been estimated at over $1 billion by the government, and economists have estimated the Australian economy will suffer an additional $6 billion in damage over the coming months due to reduced exports, according to insurance company AIR Worldwide. Queensland is Australia's top coal-producing state, and coal mining and delivery operations are being severely hampered by the flooding. Damage to agriculture is currently estimated at $400 million, and is expected to rise.

Jeff Masters

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Quoting Neapolitan:
How sad, how tragic. The current La Niña seems to be the primary motivator for the Queensland rains from what I've read here and elsewhere. However, given that Australia this spring has seen its most rain in at least 111 years, it's fair to say that 2011 is starting out on the same note as 2010. That is, a time of increasing and more extreme weather events all across the globe--which is precisely what was and is predicted to happen as the planet's oceans and atmosphere heat up due to increasing concentrations of GhGs, namely CO2.

And, personally, I don't think we've seen anything yet...


Austrailia seems to get a lot of severe weather - they still hold the record for most consecutive days above 100 °F (37.8 °C): 160 days; Marble Bar, Western Australia from 31 October 1923 to 7 April 1924.

No place else on Earth has come close since...
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December 2010 Temperature anomalies[C]:

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GOM Loop Current 120 Hour Surface Current Forecast

using HYCOM
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Quoting Neapolitan:
How sad, how tragic. The current La Niña seems to be the primary motivator for the Queensland rains from what I've read here and elsewhere. However, given that Australia this spring has seen its most rain in at least 111 years, it's fair to say that 2011 is starting out on the same note as 2010. That is, a time of increasing and more extreme weather events all across the globe--which is precisely what was and is predicted to happen as the planet's oceans and atmosphere heat up due to increasing concentrations of GhGs, namely CO2.

And, personally, I don't think we've seen anything yet...
When will it be officially anounced that 2010 was the hottest on record?
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Quoting Patrap:
A Bad Movie isnt science

Its just a bad movie.

1. Its a great movie.
2. The science its based on is not bad. The superstorm is a plausible THEORY but the gulf current could shut off and change the climate in weeks.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091130112421.htm
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
How sad, how tragic. The current La Niña seems to be the primary motivator for the Queensland rains from what I've read here and elsewhere. However, given that Australia this spring has seen its most rain in at least 111 years, it's fair to say that 2011 is starting out on the same note as 2010. That is, a time of increasing and more extreme weather events all across the globe--which is precisely what was and is predicted to happen as the planet's oceans and atmosphere heat up due to increasing concentrations of GhGs, namely CO2.

And, personally, I don't think we've seen anything yet...
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 15193
Dramatic footage of the Queensland floods

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A Bad Movie isnt science

Its just a bad movie.
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IMagine if that fell as snow! 40 ft. It can happen in a global superstorm.
http://www.wunderground.com/blog/HurricaneKatrina/show.html
http://www.globalsuperstorm.bravehost.com/whatis.html
If the gulf current shuts down "The Day After Tomorrow" will likely happen in real life.
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From drought to floods they have had a tough year, may it all balance out soon for them.
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Raw Video: Queensland Flooding Worsens


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Thanks Jeff...
Member Since: July 30, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 491

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Dr. Masters co-founded wunderground in 1995. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters 1986-1990. Co-blogging with him: Bob Henson, @bhensonweather

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