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A Letter to Mother Nature: a book review

By: Dr. Jeff Masters, 11:52 AM GMT on June 05, 2012

One of the features of wunderground.com that I'm most proud of is one all of you can take credit for--our wunderphotos. Each day, users of the web site upload an average of 500 - 600 photos of some of the most beautiful and spectacular natural phenomena on the planet. We all share the same atmosphere, and one really gets a sense of that connection when we look at the wunderphotos, which come from every corner of the planet. Since 2003, 1.5 million wunderphotos have been uploaded, with over half a million just in the past three years. We have a dedicated team of volunteer reviewers that screen each photo, and I owe a big thank-you to all of you who have served as wunderphoto moderators. One of our most dedicated wunderphotographers, Lucy Woodley (wunderhandle: observing), was inspired to collect a set of 90 of her favorite wunderphotos and put them into a book. Her effort, A Letter to Mother Nature, was published this May. Each photo in the book has a sentence above it, poetically describing the scene below. It only takes a few minutes to whip through the book, but the spectacular images and thoughtful text invite one to linger longer and contemplate the natural beauty we are surrounded by. Here's a sampling of the text and images from the book, with wunderphotos by SunsetFL, CameraDiva, and Sharrose:

Dear Mother Nature,
Quite simply, I am in awe
of you and here is why...

You remind us to always look up...



...for there are great wonders overhead.



We can't resist dancing in your meadows.




A Letter to Mother Nature is $14.99 (paperback) from amazon.com. Proceeds from sale of the book go to support the disaster relief charity Portlight.org, founded by members of the wunderground community. I give A Letter to Mother Nature my highest rating, five out of five stars.

Rare transit of Venus today
I hope all you wunderphotographers will help document for us today a rare celestial happening--a transit of Venus across the sun. On June 5th at 3:09 pm PDT, Venus will begin a historic 7-hour transit of the solar disk, appearing as a dark spot against the sun's blazing face. This will be the last transit of Venus across the sun until 2117. As always, when viewing the sun, be sure to do it indirectly, or use a proper filter such as a #14 welder's glass to block the sun's eye-damaging rays. NASA.gov has more info. I'll link the best wunderphotographs taken of today's transit at the bottom of this post tonight and Wednesday morning. Below is one from Venus' last transit of the sun, back in 2004. Thanks, wunderphotographers!

Jeff Masters
Venis in transit
Venis in transit
Venus in transit across the sun June 8, 2004. Taken at sun rise in Flagler Beach Floirda ( USA ) with a 850mm lens by photojournalist Jim Tiller.
Transit of Venus
Transit of Venus
Transit of Venus from the Wunderground Office
Venus Sunset 7
Venus Sunset 7
Venus across the sun during a cloudy evening.
Transit of Venus
Transit of Venus
Despite thick clouds we were able to capture a brief glimpse of the planet Venus transiting the Sun. This image was taken with a modern digital camera attached to the historic Ladd Observatory telescope (1891) The clouds thinned just enough to capture this one image at 6:21:38 PM EDT, just moments after second contact.
Venus and sunspots at sunset
Venus and sunspots at sunset
I took this from a telescope projection on a white surface in West Lafayette, IN
Transit of Venus 2012
Transit of Venus 2012
I used a first generation canon digital rebel, a 300mm telephoto lens, a circular polarizing filter, and the low atmosphere to capture this beautiful amateur photograph of Venus dotting the Sun's disc.
Venus transit
Venus transit

Book and Movie Reviews

The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

Reader Comments

Quoting nigel20:

Would such a storm be counted in both basins or only the one in which it developed in?

Both.

Link
Quoting KoritheMan:

Not sure why anyone would want you to shut up. You're cool, bro.

And yeah, I work closing shifts. Liked it at first, hate it now. Looking to get into TLE (Tire Lube Express) at Walmart, where I'll supposedly make $2 extra/hr, and of course my shifts will be opposite.
Thanks you are a sharp guy. I think we need spell check on the blog for people like me.
1503. nigel20
Quoting KoritheMan:

Both.

Thanks much!
1504. nigel20
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Both.

Link

Thanks TA!
Quoting gulfbreeze:
What happen to the kid named Miami Hurricane he was very sharp ?


He was posting during Beryl.
1506. K8eCane
Hurricane Diana (1984) AND THIS ONE
Hurricane Diana
Category 4 hurricane (SSHS)

Hurricane Diana near peak intensity on September 11
Formed September 8, 1984
Dissipated September 16, 1984
Highest winds 1-minute sustained:
135 mph (215 km/h)
Lowest pressure 949 mbar (hPa); 28.02 inHg
Fatalities 3 indirect
Damage $65.5 million (1984 USD)
Areas affected South Carolina, North Carolina
Part of the 1984 Atlantic hurricane season
Hurricane Diana was the fourth tropical storm, the first hurricane, the first major hurricane, and the strongest storm of the 1984 Atlantic hurricane season. Diana was the first major hurricane to hit the U.S. East Coast in nearly 20 years. Watches and warnings were issued for the storm along the East coast between eastern Florida and Virginia. It caused moderate damage in North Carolina while it looped offshore and after it made landfall as a Category 2 hurricane. Forming on September 8, Diana moved northward and wandered across North Carolina for a couple of days during mid-September, dropping heavy rainfall. Once it left the state and accelerated east-northeast, Diana quickly evolved into an extratropical cyclone. Damages to the United States totaled $65.5 million dollars (1984 USD). Three indirect fatalities were caused by the cyclone.
1509. hydrus
Quoting KoritheMan:

Maybe Grothar was the "first cause".
Unless of course he was a few hundred trillion years old when he finally put the first cause plan into action.. Which is possible considering there could be an infinite number of Universes out there and he might have been preoccupied.
1510. K8eCane
Hurricane Bertha was an intense and early-forming major hurricane that affected areas from the Leeward Islands to the United States in July of the 1996 Atlantic hurricane season. The second tropical cyclone and named storm during the season, Bertha originated from a tropical wave that moved off the coast of Africa in early July. Steadily organizing while moving generally towards the west, the disturbance was designated as a tropical depression at 0000 UTC on July 5, and was further upgraded to a tropical storm by 1200 UTC later that day. Over the next few days, continued intensification occurred, and Bertha became a Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale, the first hurricane of the season, prior to moving through the northern Leeward Islands. Late on June 8, a period of rapid intensification began, and at 0600 UTC on July 9, Bertha reached its peak intensity with maximum sustained winds of 115 mph (185 km/h) with a minimum barometric pressure of 960 mbar (28 inHg). Moving around the western periphery of the subtropical ridge, Bertha passed north of the Bahamas as a weakening hurricane before turning towards the north-northeast and undergoing another period of rapid intensification. Late on July 12, Bertha made landfall between Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina and Topsail Beach, North Carolina with winds of 90 mph (140 km/h). Gradual weakening ensued the following day as Bertha moved up the Mid-Atlantic and into New England before becoming an extratropical cyclone on July 14.
AND THIS ONE
1511. K8eCane
Hurricane Bonnie was a major hurricane that made landfall in North Carolina, United States, inflicting severe crop damage. The second named storm, first hurricane, and first major hurricane of the 1998 Atlantic hurricane season, Bonnie developed from a tropical wave that emerged off the coast of Africa on August 14. The wave gradually developed, and the system was designated a tropical depression on August 19. The depression began tracking towards the west-northwest, and became a tropical storm the next day. On August 22, Bonnie was upgraded to a hurricane, with a well-defined eye. The storm peaked as a Category 3 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, and around the same time, the storm slowed and turned more towards the north-northwest. A large and powerful cyclone, Bonnie moved ashore in North Carolina early on August 27, slowing as it turned northeast. After briefly losing hurricane status, the storm moved offshore and regained Category 1-force winds, although it weakened again on entering cooler waters.
Fearing a major hurricane strike, coastal locations from Florida to Virginia performed extensive preparations in advance of the storm. In addition to tropical cyclone watches and warnings, about 950,000 people were evacuated from the Carolinas, and the military evacuated and relocated hundreds of aircraft and vessels from the storm's projected path. Soldiers and guardsmen were deployed throughout those regions.
Hurricane Bonnie made landfall as a borderline Category 2–Category 3 storm, with intense wind gusts of up to 104 mph (167 km/h) and rainfall peaking at about 11 in (280 mm). Reports of downed trees and powerlines, as well as structural damage such as blown-out windows and torn-off roofs, were reported. In coastal North Carolina, the storm washed ashore tens of thousands of tires that had been part of an artificial reef. Crop damage was extensive, but the storm was overall less severe than initially feared. Total damage was estimated at $1 billion (1998 USD).
AND THIS ONE
1512. K8eCane
And whoever commented earlier about someone who has been through hurricanes, I have some more I can post like Bonnie and Floyd

Quoting K8eCane:
And whoever commented earlier about someone who has been through hurricanes, I have some more I can post like Bonnie and Floyd
Isabel?
Can some one tell me how to pay there dues I know it's almost time for me to pay mine?
Quoting hydrus:
Unfortunately, Florida is overdue for a bad storm ( again ). I love Florida, and do not want to see a disaster there, but it will happen, and it will be horrible.


Driving the turnpike the other day through West Palm I noticed the leading edge of the wooded areas are finally starting to come back to life that were stripped in 04. Pretty amazing, 8 years in the making.

Quoting ProgressivePulse:


Driving the turnpike the other day through West Palm I noticed the leading edge of the wooded areas are finally starting to come back to life that were stripped in 04. Pretty amazing, 8 years in the making.
Ivan feels like it was just yesterday. That was the first real storm I tracked.
Quoting KoritheMan:

No, this is wrong. The official policy on this is that crossover storms retain their original names unless they completely dissipate.


Not true, cross over storms are renamed with the next available name according to the basin that they now reside in.

Hurricane Greta–Olivia
This is where dreams are made of, if only a massive cell like this were to roll slowly over me



I'd be doing this tonight

1520. nigel20
Quoting KoritheMan:

Ivan feels like it was just yesterday. That was the first real storm I tracked.

Ivan was the first storm that I experienced....luckily it wasn't a direct impact!
Quoting ProgressivePulse:


Not true, cross over storms are renamed with the next available name according to the basin that they now reside in.

Hurricane Greta–Olivia
He is right if they cross over from one basin they get a new name.
Quoting ProgressivePulse:


Not true, cross over storms are renamed with the next available name according to the basin that they now reside in.

Hurricane Greta%u2013Olivia
No, that was then. I can't find the exact quote on it, but I'm pretty sure the NHC recently announced a policy change. I might be wrong, though.
Quoting nigel20:

Ivan was the first storm that I experienced....luckily it wasn't a direct impact!
It was for me and he was not fun no power for over a week and lots of clean up lost about 30 trees.
Quoting nigel20:

Ivan was the first storm that I experienced....luckily it wasn't a direct impact!


You guys always seem to luck out with landfalls somehow. IIRC, only Gilbert and Gustav ever actually came ashore in recent decades.
1525. K8eCane
Quoting KoritheMan:

Isabel?


Well i didnt actually get into the eyewall of Isabel
1526. nigel20
Quoting gulfbreeze:
It was for me and he was not fun no power for over a week and lots of clean up lost about 30 trees.

Sorry about that!
Quoting KoritheMan:


You guys always seem to luck out with landfalls somehow. IIRC, only Gilbert and Gustav ever actually came ashore in recent decades.

Yes, that's correct...both Dean and Ivan would have been devastating had they directly impacted Jamica. i wasn't around during Gilbert, but i heard that was really bad...up to today it's still Jamaica's costliest hurricane
Quoting sunlinepr:
Changes to the Oceanic Niño Index (ONI)
Table 1995 to 2012....

Check 2006 values, similar to 2012

Could there be a correlation?



that's what I posted yesterday but everyone ignored me even though I'm new ..but anyways I was surprised when the enso data from 2006 is the same so far for 2012 enso data
when Gilbert was retired in 88 ten years after that it was georges then 10 years after that it was gustav. What's up with the "g" named storm every ten years after Gilbert hmm that had me wondering
Quoting KoritheMan:

Ivan feels like it was just yesterday. That was the first real storm I tracked.

I remember the first storm I tracked which seems like it was yesterday for me as well(I was 11 at the time). Andrew in 1992. It was right around the time when the Weather Channel came out with a special documentary on hurricanes(on VHS tape) that they were selling. Then i decided to watch their tropical update just for fun and start tracking any disturbance that would develop. Coincidentally, that first disturbance I went on to track became TS Andrew, but after a few days, it kinda looked sheared and looked like it was about to dissipate, but then the Friday before its eventual Monday pre-dawn landfall in South Florida, things changed and the rest was history in the making.
Quoting KoritheMan:
No, that was then. I can't find the exact quote on it, but I'm pretty sure the NHC recently announced a policy change. I might be wrong, though.


I've not heard of such a change personally. Excuse my ignorance if I am in error. I must find out for certain now as conflicting info is a big no no, regardless of how trivial it is.

Quoting ProgressivePulse:


I must find out for certain now as conflicting info is a big no no, regardless of how trivial it is.
That's what I like to hear. ;)
1532. nigel20
I'm off to bed...good night everyone!
Quoting windshear1993:
that's what I posted yesterday but everyone ignored me even though I'm new ..but anyways I was surprised when the enso data from 2006 is the same so far for 2012 enso data


I didn't see your post.... anyhow very true the values are the same.

We have analog characteristics here....
Crossover's keep their name, I stand corrected.

Official Documentation
Quoting sunlinepr:


I didn't see your post.... anyhow very true the values are the same.

We have analog characteristics here....
yes thanks finally someones on the same page as me..and yet they still havent put 2006 as a anologue which I don't get
Night all. Looks to be a rocky morning in SEFL. Not too often do you see this kind of CAPE in the overnight hours. Also noticed the humidity kick up into full on in your face levels past couple days. Summer is here...

Wow!!!
Seychelles Meteorological Services
Tropical Cyclone Advisory #9
DEPRESSION SE COMBLANT, FORMER KUENA (14-20112012)
10:00 AM RET June 7 2012
========================================

At 6:00 AM UTC, Filling Depression, Former Kuena (1003 hPa) located at 9.1S 56.0E has 10 minute sustained winds of 25 knots with gusts of 40 knots. The low is reported as moving northwest at 5 knots.

Dvorak Intensity:

Forecast and Intensity
=======================

12 HRS: 8.2S 55.1E - 25 knots (Depression se Comblant)
24 HRS: 7.6S 53.8E - 20 knots (Depression se Comblant)
48 HRS: 5.2S 51.2E - se Dissipant

Additional Information
====================

Undergoing northerly wind shear, system has rapidly weaken and deep convective activity is now far in the south southeast of the low level circulation center. The residual low is expected to keep on shifting globally northwestwards within the next 48-60 hrs filling then dissipating.

A regeneration seems now very unlikely.

Residual deep convective activity should however concern Agalega within the next 24 hours.

Last warning related to this system unless regeneration.
1539. gippgig
The current issue of Science News (June 2) has an article, "Storm Front", p. 26, about the problem of forecasting hurricane intensity.
Quoting ProgressivePulse:
Crossover's keep their name, I stand corrected.

Official Documentation


A crossover? It's kind of hard to tell with the models I can find.



Quoting gippgig:
The current issue of Science News (June 2) has an article, "Storm Front", p. 26, about the problem of forecasting hurricane intensity.


Excellent article thanks. :)

I read an article about this not too long ago. Though it wasn't as technical.

Search still on for 'holy grail' of hurricane forecasting

Quoting gulfbreeze:
It sure would be nice to hear from people on this blog that have lived longer than 20 years and have seen some real history making Hurricanes!!
We're all working or resting up from a long hard day.
1543. LargoFl
1544. LargoFl
1545. LargoFl
1546. LargoFl
Quoting lobdelse81:

I remember the first storm I tracked which seems like it was yesterday for me as well(I was 11 at the time). Andrew in 1992. It was right around the time when the Weather Channel came out with a special documentary on hurricanes(on VHS tape) that they were selling. Then i decided to watch their tropical update just for fun and start tracking any disturbance that would develop. Coincidentally, that first disturbance I went on to track became TS Andrew, but after a few days, it kinda looked sheared and looked like it was about to dissipate, but then the Friday before its eventual Monday pre-dawn landfall in South Florida, things changed and the rest was history in the making.
The first storm I tracked was David back in '79... with pencil and one of those paper maps you used to get in the newspaper at the beginning of the hurricane season.

My most interesting non-meteorological memory of Andrew was that 5 days before it devastated parts of the Bahamas, we had a landmark election here in the Bahamas during which the incumbent governing party was changed for the first time in 25 years. During that time period, we had 0 major hurricane strikes in the Bahamas. Within a week of the change of government, we got hit by the worst cat 5 hurricane since Gilbert. According to Wikipedia, the "hurricane struck four days after Hubert Ingraham became Bahamian Prime Minister, the first new Prime Minister in 25 years." I remember the weather report the night of the election mentioning the "tropical wave" that later became Andrew, and how my mother insisted on going to the grocery store on the 21st because she was convinced the storm was coming and it would be bad....

The only good thing about Andrew's passage through the Bahamas is that its relatively small size meant that New Providence, on the storm's south side, didn't experience those cat 5 winds [or the 20 ft storm surge they had in Current, Eleuthera]. I have friends who were living in North Eleuthera at the time who have told me riding out Andrew was one of the worst experiences of their lives. We had three deaths here, but things would have been considerably worse if the eye had tracked 50 miles further south.
1548. LargoFl
Good Morning folks! calm here and no rain here as of yet,but that will change later on, have a great day everyone
Quoting LargoFl:
Good Morning folks! calm here and no rain here as of yet,but that will change later on, have a great day everyone
Enjoy!

I am not ready for another day of rain, unless I also get some 15 kt winds to keep it cool at the same time... somehow I don't think I'll be that lucky.
Good morning at 5:09 am

Quoting gulfbreeze:
It sure would be nice to hear from people on this blog that have lived longer than 20 years and have seen some real history making Hurricanes!!


I haven't made any hurricanes but have suffered through a few.

In 1947, when I was about 3 months old my home town, Pointe-Ala-Hache, LA was hit by Hurricane George, The Fort Lauderdale Hurricane. My folks, building there own house at the time, were flooded in my grandmother's house. I was there but don't remember this one.

In 1956, Hurricane Flossy did not worry my father enough for him to evacuate us so at about 2 in the morning we children were awakened by our parents and evacuated to the attic. The house got about 5 feet of water in it but thankfully we didn't need the axe to cut our way out to the roof. I can still remember the morning view of the waves crashing into my cousin's house next door. Why my father had two windows put into the attic is still beyond me but they were used that morning. We were cleaning up the house by afternoon. My memory of that was sweeping the marsh grass out of the door as the water retreated and the water moccasin we found in one of the closets. My mother never tolerated staying at home again during any storm of consequence.

Had a few minor experiences during the rest of my hometown life but it wasn't till several days after I left for LSU in 1965 that Hurricane Betsy virtually destroyed the place. That hurricane did major damage to the town and it never fully recovered. My folk's house, raised to 11 feet off the ground after Flossy, was moved over 1/2 mile along the Mississippi River levee. My father had it returned to the site, raised even a little further, and he (with his sons helping) built the supporting structure very, very strong. It was months before the family got resettled into the house and if it wasn't for the iron will of my mother it might have never happened. The entire inside of the house had to be re-built.

In 1969 we had a very close call when Hurricane Camille passed a little east of Pointe-Ala-Hache. The storm surge up the river washed logs over the Mississippi River levee but not enough water to flood the town. The re-built (after Betsy in '65) Gulf side levee held. We never even lost electricity while the areas further SE in the Parish were badly damaged and flooded again. Later that same hurricane would dump enough rain over Nelson county, Virginia, my present home county, to kill 1% of the population in one night. A night of horror in the mountains when brooks and tiny creeks became raging rivers 40 feet deep. Some of the victims have never been found.

Finally, after both of my parents died, we sold the family place in Pointe-Ala-Hache, two weeks before Hurricane Katrina slammed ashore. Very, very few houses survived in town. Two that were destroyed were over 150 years old. But my parents home did take the 20 feet plus of storm surge and the mighty winds and waves. Several of the windows, including the frames, were completely knocked out and there was a refrigerator up in a tree outside but the house was one of the first completely re-built after the hurricane.

For all practical purposes the town, one of the oldest ones along the mighty Mississippi, has ceased to resemble anything I remember as a kid just 60 years ago.

Brief summaries each, but some of my history with hurricanes.
1552. LargoFl
Good morning... Carlotta on the 6z GFS

Quoting percylives:


I haven't made any hurricanes but have suffered through a few.

In 1947, when I was about 3 months old my home town, Pointe-Ala-Hache, LA was hit by Hurricane George, The Fort Lauderdale Hurricane. My folks, building there own house at the time, were flooded in my grandmother's house. I was there but don't remember this one.

In 1956, Hurricane Flossy did not worry my father enough for him to evacuate us so at about 2 in the morning we children were awakened by our parents and evacuated to the attic. The house got about 5 feet of water in it but thankfully we didn't need the axe to cut our way out to the roof. I can still remember the morning view of the waves crashing into my cousin's house next door. Why my father had two windows put into the attic is still beyond me but they were used that morning. We were cleaning up the house by afternoon. My memory of that was sweeping the marsh grass out of the door as the water retreated and the water moccasin we found in one of the closets. My mother never tolerated staying at home again during any storm of consequence.

Had a few minor experiences during the rest of my hometown life but it wasn't till several days after I left for LSU in 1965 that Hurricane Betsy virtually destroyed the place. That hurricane did major damage to the town and it never fully recovered. My folk's house, raised to 11 feet off the ground after Flossy, was moved over 1/2 mile along the Mississippi River levee. My father had it returned to the site, raised even a little further, and he (with his sons helping) built the supporting structure very, very strong. It was months before the family got resettled into the house and if it wasn't for the iron will of my mother it might have never happened. The entire inside of the house had to be re-built.

In 1969 we had a very close call when Hurricane Camille passed a little east of Pointe-Ala-Hache. The storm surge up the river washed logs over the Mississippi River levee but not enough water to flood the town. The re-built (after Betsy in '65) Gulf side levee held. We never even lost electricity while the areas further SE in the Parish were badly damaged and flooded again. Later that same hurricane would dump enough rain over Nelson county, Virginia, my present home county, to kill 1% of the population in one night. A night of horror in the mountains when brooks and tiny creeks became raging rivers 40 feet deep. Some of the victims have never been found.

Finally, after both of my parents died, we sold the family place in Pointe-Ala-Hache, two weeks before Hurricane Katrina slammed ashore. Very, very few houses survived in town. Two that were destroyed were over 150 years old. But my parents home did take the 20 feet plus of storm surge and the mighty winds and waves. Several of the windows, including the frames, were completely knocked out and there was a refrigerator up in a tree outside but the house was one of the first completely re-built after the hurricane.

For all practical purposes the town, one of the oldest ones along the mighty Mississippi, has ceased to resemble anything I remember as a kid just 60 years ago.

Brief summaries each, but some of my history with hurricanes.


I love to just watch trees fall during tropical storms. Its awfully cool.
Quoting LargoFl:


Where are you on these maps, largo?!
1556. MahFL
Quoting ProgressivePulse:


Driving the turnpike the other day through West Palm I noticed the leading edge of the wooded areas are finally starting to come back to life that were stripped in 04. Pretty amazing, 8 years in the making.


8 years is no amount of time for mother nature.
Quoting MAweatherboy1:

Good morning... Carlotta on the 6z GFS


And much later in the run

1558. LargoFl
Quoting weatherh98:


Where are you on these maps, largo?!
over several sites on the web like mikes weather page and baynews 9 etc..mike has a great page at..spaghettimodels.com
Quoting LargoFl:
over several sites on the web like mikes weather page and baynews 9 etc


Yea but what's your 10-20
1560. LargoFl
Quoting weatherh98:


Yea but what's your 10-20
dont understand that
1561. LargoFl
Quoting weatherh98:


Where are you on these maps, largo?!
im in largo florida,pinellas county,near tampa,st pete etc
Quoting LargoFl:
dont understand that

Cb radio talk

It means what's your location
Quoting LargoFl:
im in largo florida,pinellas county,near tampa,st pete etc



Thanks
1564. LargoFl
1565. LargoFl
Local mets say our rainy season has begun, Thank You Mother Nature, end this drought please
Gotta go, ya'll... have a great day! And contrats to all those finally getting some rain...
1567. LargoFl
JeffMasters has created a new entry.
Good Morning to all. Good rains falling over the Lakes northwest of Austin should stay west of me but at least the Lakes are getting some water.
Wow!!! Thank YOU, Dr. Masters, for your kind words about WunderPhotos® and for your outstanding review of A Letter to Mother Nature!! I'm am so happy to know how much you appreciate WunderPhoto photographers and the volunteer moderators who keep the Wunder Photo Galleries current with weather and outdoor photos!! It's a labor of love and it's always nice to hear such kind words!

Thank You So Much, Luci!! You have certainly inspired me with your lovely books!! Here's a review I wrote for Amazon when I received my copies of A Letter to Mother Nature.


My eagerly anticipated copies of A Letter to Mother Nature (Second Edition)(Volume 1)from Amazon has arrived! WOW!!! Luci has done a superlative job!! I purchased copies and loved the first edition, so my admiration for her second edition is even more so because it has included more of Luci's inspired writing and more images from members of the talented WunderPhoto community on Wunderground.com. This is a "wunderful" book to give as a gift and a lovely book to keep for anytime you want to be uplifted by the beauty of nature! The profits go to support the disaster relief charity Portlight.org, founded by members of the wunderground community. Awesome! What a great gift to Portlight and to those receiving the book!

Luci is a talented writer and I love the way she put together my photos, ending with Nightwatch, a loggerhead sea turtle, expressing her gratitude to the Georgia Sea Turtle Center for helping her recover her health and return to her ocean home. It sincerely illustrates Luci's beautiful theme, "Words of Gratitude"! The lovely photo of the cypress trees showing us how if we all stand together is a perfect example of what happens when we do!! And so is Luci's book, and the Georgia Sea Turtle Center, and Wunderground photographers, and Portlight!