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Significant Nor'easter to impact Northeast...

By: Zachary Labe , 7:35 PM GMT on February 06, 2013

Zachary Labe
Posted: 6 February 2013

A northern stream influence will phase with another disturbance out of the southern stream and subsequent cyclogenesis along the New England coast is anticipated during the February 8-9 time period. Significant storm impacts will occur from western New York east to Cape Cod. Given the late redevelopment and associated Miller B-type storm formation, many areas south of the 40N will see little impact from this event. Slow movement and impressive mesoscale banding will result in snow accumulations in excess of two feet for some areas just west of Boston. While too early to declare this a KU event, the entire situation is definitely worth monitoring over the next few days with potential NESIS ratings likely on the order of 2-3.

Current Surface Plot...

(Courtesy of HPC)

February 8-9 Nor'easter
A quick hello after a short hiatus from blogging over the past few weeks; I know many of you are still waiting to hear my thoughts on the American Meteorological Society conference. Eventually I will get around to writing up a quick summary for those interested. Nevertheless, it was a necessary to provide an immediate full update on what will be a very significant nor'easter to impact the Northeast. Blizzard conditions will likely occur across much of the densely populated portions of eastern Massachusetts including the Boston metropolitan region.

The complex and impressively large storm system will build itself in a series of critical puzzle pieces that will fit together to east coast cyclogenesis. A northern stream wave, which is already evident on radar across the northern and eastern Midwest will continue tracking south and east. This weak surface low (not even evident on some surface maps) will track across southern Ohio. A weak H85 low will be associated with this wave and will move into Pennsylvania and extreme southern New York. Therefore WAA at the surface will likely occur under southwest winds despite a strong banana high pressure system to the north. As the northern stream begins to interact with the moisture-filled subtropical jet, another low pressure will begin to take shape off the North Carolina coastline. This is a very typical Miller B type storm evolution.

The low pressure will begin to rapidly deepen and expend its precipitation shield inland. Isentropic lift and weak frontogenic forcing ahead of the S/W in Ohio will spread light snows across western and the southern tier counties of New York State by Thursday night. This precipitation will be primarily driven from the northern stream system. Guidance is suggesting a small window of bombogenesis with pressure falls ~3mb/hr as surface pressures drop to 988mb south of Long Island, NY. A track just inside the 40/70 benchmark is then expected.

Precipitation will be falling in two distinctive shields. One across New York State and the other expanding in the Delmarva with the coastal low. Eventually as the phasing occurs (timing remains uncertain), the radar will take on a different graphic with a strong dominant deformation axis from central New York that will slowly move east spreading heavy snow in its path. There will likely be a large dry slot that will form to the south and east of the deformation axis. It is likely this will impact most of the state of Pennsylvania. As will be noted below, there are a few signs on the latest guidance that this dry slot could impact areas as far east and north as New York City and the Connecticut river valley.

The low pressure will continue trekking northeast and develop several impressive mesoscale bands associated with the CCB axis from New York City northeast to Boston. Guidance suggests high Omega values and near-ideal snow growth with a low, moist dendritic layer. H85s will primary focus around -10C providing an additional support for excellent snow rates during the height of this storm especially for areas just inland towards Worcester, Massachusetts. QPF will likely exceed .5" in a small three window for some areas of central and eastern Massachusetts with therefore associated snow rates exceeding 2"/hr. Elevated instability will be possible along the highest frontogensis and PWATs axis again focused in central areas; therefore thunder snows cannot be ruled out. This signal though may grow as we get closer to the event and 4km HIRES models have a better look at the banding impacts of the storm.

A few current models indicate that as the low becomes vertically stacked, that it may stall for a period of time. It is likely this is an over-amplification error. Therefore the QPF amounts >3" are likely irrelevant to this event. In general the jet flow is still relatively progressive and inhibits these classic KU characteristics.

A widespread and uniform moderate snowfall will occur from western New York east and north to the northern Maine with 4-10" of snow. The best forcing will be south and east along with the best snow growth. Closer to the tightly wrapped east coast low will be an axis of very high snow amounts that may approach two feet in some areas. The highest QPF and snow will likely fall near the Worcester region.

A few concerns of mine still exist for this event. Given the progressive flow if the phase capture occurs a bit later, the secondary low will form farther northeast. Therefore the dry slow will approach the tristate region into portions of even eastern Connecticut. This would also limit the higher snowfall amounts across the southern tier of New York allowing for more WAA as 2m temperatures warm into the mid 30s. Also the exact location of the rain/snow primary lines, especially towards New York City, will be highly dependent on the strength of the deformation axis/CCB. Therefore a high bust potential exists in this region. A few days remain before the event, but by Thursday evening WAA snows will already be moving into western New York. Stay tuned!

Regional Radar...
(Courtesy of Intellicast)

Regional Advisories...

(Courtesy of NOAA)

This is my current rain/snow line...
Pittsburgh, PA - State College, PA - Wilkes-Barre, PA - Mt. Pocono, PA - New York City, NY - New London, CT - Hyannis, MA

***For this event there will not be one defined snow line. Also little to no mixed precipitation is expected given the setup therefore limiting precipitation types to either rain or snow. I chose my line based on a 75/25 split with >75% being snow as the majority precipitation for areas along and north of the line. Therefore while areas will mix with rain to the south, some snow accumulation cannot be ruled out especially for areas in the deformation axis as the system begins to pull northeast into the Gulf of Maine.

Storm Reports...
None.

Storm Impacts...
1. Widespread snow accumulations possible in excess of 10" from Buffalo, NY east to Boston, MA.
2. High, damaging winds anticipated along the immediate coast with gale force gusts in excess of 55mph particularly along Cape Cod.
3. Rain/snow mix can be expected in a narrow corridor along the southern periphery of the deformation axis. This may impact the NYC metro area.
4. High snow rates can be expected with model output suggesting up >6"/hr totals for a 3 hour period in New England during the height of the event.
5. Major impacts along I-95 corridor north of 40N where few winter storms have occurred this year to prepare people for winter driving conditions.

Snow Map...


***Snow map posted 3pm 2/6/2013. This snow map is preliminary due to its early posting, but should give a general idea for most locations where the heavier snow will occur. My favored axis for two feet potential is just west of Boston towards the Worcester corridor where high snow rates and excellent snow growth will occur in correspondence to the impressive CCB band. A more difficult forecast for New York City is likely where they will be very close to a dry slot and warmer temperatures. In the end my forecast does abide by a colder approach give the dense air mass over the region and a bit of snow cover. Therefore I am extending some light snow accumulation as far south as Philadelphia where they may see the tail end of the deformation axis. The dry slot will significantly inhibit snowfall over the Middle Atlantic including Maryland, Washington DC, and central Pennsylvania. Warmer temperatures at the surface will also prevail in this region. Nevertheless it is possible for light snow accumulations as far south as the Mason-Dixon line.

Current Great Lakes Water Temperatures...

(Courtesy of NOAA)

Selected City Accumulations for the Northeast...
Hagerstown, MD- Light to moderate rain
Baltimore, MD- Scattered rain showers
Salisbury, MD- A few rain showers
Pittsburgh, PA- Rain/snow showers. Snow accumulations up to 2-3"
State College PA- Rain/snow showers. Snow accumulations 1-3"
Williamsport, PA- Periods of snow mixing with a little rain. Snow accumulations 2-4"
Altoona, PA- Rain/snow showers. Snow accumulations 1-2"
Harrisburg, PA- Rain/snow showers. Snow accumulations T-2"
Lancaster, PA- Rain/snow showers. Snow accumulations T-2"
Philadelphia, PA- Periods of rain mixed with occasional heavy snow. Snow accumulations 2-4"
Allentown, PA- Periods of heavy rain/snow. Snow accumulations 3-6"
Scranton, PA- Periods of heavy rain/snow. Snow accumulation 3-7"
Washington, DC- A few rain showers
Wilmington, DE- Occasional rain/snow showers. Snow accumulations 1-4"
Dover, DE- Occasional rain showers
Trenton, NJ- Periods of heavy rain/snow. Snow accumulations 2-5"
New York City, NY- Heavy snow occasionally mixed with rain. Snow accumulations 3-7"
Poughkeepsie, NY- Periods of heavy snow. Snow accumulations 4-8"
Binghamton, NY- Periods of heavy snow. Snow accumulations 5-10"
Ithaca, NY- Periods of heavy snow. Snow accumulations 5-10"
Albany, NY- Heavy snow and gusty winds. Snow accumulations 10-14"
Hartford, CT- Heavy snow and strong winds. Snow accumulations 10-15"
Concord, NH- Heavy snow and strong winds. Snow accumulations 14-18"
Providence, RI- Heavy snow occasionally mixed with periods of rain. Snow accumulations 10-14"
Worcester, MA- Blizzard conditions expected. Snow accumulations 15-20" with localized higher amounts
Boston, MA- Blizzard conditions expected. Snow accumulations 12-15" with localized higher amounts
Nantucket, MA- Periods of rain mixed with heavy snow. Snow accumulations 3-7"
Hyannis, MA- Periods of heavy rain/snow. Snow accumulations 4-8"
Burlington, VT- Heavy snow expected. Snow accumulations 8-12"
Portland, ME- Blizzard conditions expected. Snow accumulations 14-18" with localized higher amounts
Bangor, ME- Periods of heavy snow. Snow accumulations 8-12"
"Subject to Change"

Current Northeast Snow Depth and Northeast Wind chills...

(Courtesy of Wunderground)

Model Analysis
A few computer model differences still exist especially in regards to the evolution of the phasing of the northern and southern streams. The extent and timing of this is critical for forecasts. Currently the NAM is the flattest piece of guidance despite the overly excessive QPF progged once the storm moves east of Cape Cod. 3-4" storm totals will not be occurring anywhere for this event; I do not buy into the storm stalling and being captured theory. I also believe the ECMWF is having a few QPF issues in the extent of the western periphery of the 1" range in New York state. Also it is currently running as the coldest model with 2m temps <0C as far south as the Mason-Dixon line during the start of the event. It is likely there will be enough WAA to allow temperatures to rise into the mid 30s as far north as Williamsport for a short period.

Globals will struggle with the exact positioning and cut-off of the dry slot. I would expect this region to be larger than anticipated on guidance and pose a significantly wrench in forecasting efforts for portions of the Middle Atlantic. In general not many other model contrasts exist at this point as it is a bit too early for HIRES 4km runs.

After the Storm
Quieter weather and little in the way of lake effect snow is likely for the period after this event. We will begin to see the ridge axis slide east across the central United States allowing for milder air to slide in across the east coast. Nevertheless, the air mass only remains marginally above normal so a torch period is not expected. A low pressure will track up through the Great Lakes for the beginning of next week. Some cold air immediately at the surface will allow any rain to fall as freezing rain especially for areas along and north of I-80. Eventually the precipitation will change to all rain north to the Canadian border. QPF amounts will generally be light and less than 0.5" for all areas. The next storm system of interest impacts the region on Valentine's Day. This event poses a bit more of a threat for wintry precipitation. Current wavelengths suggest though that precipitation type will be a problem for some areas at the minimum. At this point a significant east coast snow storm is not likely, but some areas of moderate to heavy snow accumulations are possible. February continues to look farely active with a top heavy northern stream. In response periods of dry, cold air such as that which occurred in January will not affect the Northeast this month. Snowfall accumulations may average near normal for many areas along and north of 40N this month. Again the general circulation is fairly similar to an -ENSO despite the conflicting teleconnections. I will post a new blog as soon as I can towards this coming weekend.

Please post storm reports in this blog from across the Northeast during the winter storm and please post location of observation in each report...

This blog is in progress. Check back soon...

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Lower Susquehanna Valley Doppler...

(Courtesy of WGAL)

"10mi northeast of Harrisburg 2012-2013 Winter Statistics"
(Snow Stats)
Monthly Total (October)- 0.0"
Monthly Total (November)- 0.8"
Monthly Total (December)- 9.5"
Monthly Total (January)- 5.8"
Monthly Total (February)- 1.8"
Seasonal Total- 18.1"
Winter Weather Advisories- 6
Winter Storm Warnings- 0
Ice Storm Warnings- 0
Blizzard Warnings- 0
Freezing Rain Advisories- 1
Winter Storm Watches- 0

(Temperature Stats)
Lowest High Temperature- 32.1F
Lowest Low Temperature- 18.2F
Wind Chill Advisories- 0
Wind Chill Warnings- 0

(Snow Storms Stats)
First Trace of Snow - November 24 - Lake Effect Snow Showers
First Measurable Snow - November 27 - 0.8" - Overrunning event
Enhanced Clipper - December 24 - 2.1" - Christmas Eve Snow!
Miller B - December 26 - 3.3" - 0.15" of freezing rain also
Miller B - December 29 - 4.1" - Moderate all snow event
SWFE - January 15-16 - 1.0" - Snow/sleet/freezing rain/rain
Arctic Cold Front - January 21 - 0.5" - fluffy snow
Weak southern disturbance - January 25 - 3.3" - snow ratios above 20:1
Great Lakes Cutter - January 28 - 1.0" - snow/sleet/freezing rain/rain
Alberta Clipper - February 2 - 1.0" - very light snow


The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

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Quoting originalLT:
Hi Hoy, That is a concern of mine, the foreword speed of the coastal low. If its fast, the time we all get precip. will be shorter, thus less possible accumulations.


Yes, and a concern of many of us I would think. Let's wishcast that concern away.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Quoting originalLT:
Danielb, you are right, that precip. shield has NOT progressed that far to the West. I'm a bit surprised, especially since the center of the low appears to be slightly West of where it was progged to be, closer to the coast that is.


LT, I think that changes and spreads North and West as the storm starts to progress towards the cape may latitude.
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I hear the concerns with regards to speed..... but for all the haters. Check these numbers out
http://ow.ly/i/1uEP1
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Hi Hoy, That is a concern of mine, the foreword speed of the coastal low. If its fast, the time we all get precip. will be shorter, thus less possible accumulations.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Danielb, you are right, that precip. shield has NOT progressed that far to the West. I'm a bit surprised, especially since the center of the low appears to be slightly West of where it was progged to be, closer to the coast that is.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Quoting originalLT:
Snowing moderately here in Stamford, Temp. has stabilized at 31.9F, Baro. is down to 29.92" Wind is NE at 10-20mph. We have about 3" on the ground. Rain/snow line is close but just South of me.


The rain probably won't hit you LT. Here we are at 1 PM and even a few miles from the coast we aren't entirely rain. It's basically waves of sleet with rain drops in between.

3" on the ground is 3" more than they seemed to expect for you at this point. Can add this to whatever totals they were previously projecting, assuming it doesn't zoom off too fast for as big of a wraparound as they've expected. Nothing on ground here but slushy buildup on cold surfaces, puddes everywhere, temp remaining steady at 33.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
down to 28.5 degrees in Roseland, NJ. But that precip shield sure seems to be heading to the east. Time to pivot, time to pivot
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Snowing moderately here in Stamford, Temp. has stabilized at 31.9F, Baro. is down to 29.92" Wind is NE at 10-20mph. We have about 2.5- 3" on the ground. Rain/snow line is close but just South of me.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
There is so much more to go with this system still evolving.Give this guy time,its going to be an impressive system for a a huge area.
Patience
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Blizz called that "large dry slot in PA." perfectly in his discussion above,(fifth paragraph down). Nicely done.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Bustsayers, take a look at the last few ticks of the radar. Precip shield is starting to move northwest and I think we are seeing the beginning of the pivot we will need in NNJ and NYC to get big snows. Rain line getting closer but not doing anything to change the beautiful white stuff falling from the sky!
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I am not sure what this means to those in NJ, but my temperature is now 35F. It has slowly increased this morning. Probably, because our cloud cover isn't thick and it is very light out. With the sun up higher in the sky it must be warming the atmosphere a bit.
I am in the Lower Susquehanna Valley. I wonder where the cold air is coming from for NJ to get to snow? Even Blizz was above freezing. I guess we will have to wait until the sun sets to get colder
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Definitely too early to call busts. This thing is far from over. There will be busts here and there, but lets wait until it's over.

temp down to 33 with mix of sleet and rain.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
37F
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Snowing good here in Smithfield, RI right now. I'll be out plowing most of the night after this between Smithfield, Norton, MA and my house in Sutton, MA I will be right in the thick of it all!
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Quoting TheRasberryPatch:
looks like the front is starting to fall apart and the storm along the coast is intensifying. look at all those yellows on the radar from the coastal Low


would mean energy xfer
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
sounds like some reacting to model runs and saying bust
id wait on that idea instead of jumping on
storm may wind up deeper quicker shut off sooner but alsi snow change start early too

mt holly widened 6-8 further south in nj
expanded othertotals higher
response to earlier temp drop

crapuweather just want their 6" nyc fore to verify
wait on nws products before jumping ship


damn tablet typing
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
looks like the front is starting to fall apart and the storm along the coast is intensifying. look at all those yellows on the radar from the coastal Low
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
#256
peaks have passed
38F
steady drop
more northrrly dir to gusts now
mix has stopped tho just rain
slow but steady evolution
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
A lot of what I'm reading here sounds like this one is shaping up to be kind of a bust everywhere except eastern New England. Is that about right?

They were calling for up to 18" early this morning in the Albany area, but I'm thinking 10" would probably be the most we'll pick up that far inland. No phasing, and a fast mover.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Pcroton, thanks for the snow maps! I bookmarked them this time. Following your advice from a previous post, I looked around and found a few on my own, but it was surprising difficult (as you had warned).

I see that the Taunton snow map has replaced some of its 24+ with 18-24.
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NBC also was saying 12-20 earlier and now looking more at like 6-10 and only extreme Eastern Long Island in a heavier 10-18"+ swath. I know model to model the low's position and QPF amounts vary, but jeez we are all over the place here. I am inclined to split the difference and think average of a foot for LI NY Metro and 2 feet plus in Boston. Who knows though!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
272. bwi
15z position

What a missed opportunity for DC -- that's usually our sweet spot.
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271. bwi
Quoting bwi:


I don't know about faster, but the 12z map I just posted is a little west of where I expected at that time (I expected Cape Hatteras based on GFS).


Yes, faster too, NW of where GFS showed at that time.
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270. bwi
Quoting originalLT:
The coastal storm, in my opinion is moving faster than thought. There fore perhaps the precip. that we do get will end sooner than thought, maybe in the very early morning hours, at least here in the NYC Metro area. This may affect storm totals every where. There is no negative NAO so there might be little to slow this storm's forward speed.


I don't know about faster, but the 12z map I just posted is a little west of where I expected at that time (I expected Cape Hatteras based on GFS).
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Sigh... I've never seen snow, so this is just a fantasy blog for me, anyway. (stares off to horizon)

Carry on.
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The coastal storm, in my opinion is moving faster than thought. There fore perhaps the precip. that we do get will end sooner than thought, maybe in the very early morning hours, at least here in the NYC Metro area. This may affect storm totals every where. There is no negative NAO so there might be little to slow this storm's forward speed.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
267. bwi
12z surface map

994mb looks like
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THAT'S WHAT SHE SAID!!1
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
HEAVY!!!!

(passes out from excitement)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Temps around NYC still above 33. But some stations reporting snow mist. Might explain HM'S lowered forecast. BP here was high of 1026mb yesterday. 1010 now. Storm at 996mb. Tapping Gulf Stream now.

" ..guy in Virginia who builds igloos out of sleet. " :-)))
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Quoting HeavySnow:
36 with molten lead raining hell from above in Annandale, VA.


You think I'm impressed by this? I vacation in Hell every summer to get away from all the humidity we get here in the MA. The big man and I are boys. We play cards and discuss how we're going to "stick it" to the guy in Virginia who builds igloos out of sleet.

You wait. The grand finale is going to be incredible...
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Quoting originalLT:
Henry Margusity, on Accu. Weather just LOWERED the snow amounts he forecasts for the NYC. metro area to only about 5.5" WOW, Still forecasts a big snow for Eastern New England!


That's interesting, forecasts are still saying around 10"
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
36 with molten lead raining hell from above in Annandale, VA.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Quoting originalLT:
On radar, the rain/snow line is only about 5 miles South of me , over Long Island Sound. Think it will be here within the hour. TRP to answer your question, , Monroe should get 12-18" , probably on the higher end of that scale. Steady light snow still falling, 31.9F, Baro down to 30.04". NE winds 10-15mph, WHG.


I wonder if you'll even change over, LT. We're still having sleet here. Some drops mixed in from time to time, but predominantly sleet. Temp remains at 33.8. I doubt we'll get to the expected high of 37.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Henry Margusity, on Accu. Weather just LOWERED the snow amounts he forecasts for the NYC. metro area to only about 5.5" WOW, Still forecasts a big snow for Eastern New England!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
I am surprised this isn't a Miller A storm. didn't it start in the gulf? if not it was very close
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Nothing of note here and it would appear that I may be in the part of Pennsylvania that may see little or nothing due to the nature of the storm. Too far south/east for the original low, too far west for the backend snows.

Booo...
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
SL on the Old NJ Shore:

Temps from six stations show peaks at 40-42 F from 5-9 and dropping from 9-9:30 to 40 - 39. Lower to mid levels at or just above freezing. Waves look like 6-8 ft. Winds ENE 10-20, G 30 + Nothing lower than 38.5 F. around the area.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
P- Interesting you are seeing a mix and are further east by about 3 miles.
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yeah P, seeing the snow get heavier up here and a more noticeable east wind and some gusts from the north. I'm perched in a SBUX with a view out the window. Temp is steady at 31.3. Barely budging
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Lightning off the coast of NC,lot of power being generated by this storm,just proves this is going to be something big
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Thanks original....So Poughkeepsie and Hyde Park might get into the 20s?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Temps have dropped even in SE NJ from 47s and 48s to 44s and 45s!

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
(wags tail at P)

Last night's clouds was as good a'telling as the media. This will be a big wet one.

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We've dropped another degree - 37F and counting down!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Wind has gone variable. We just had our first solid gust from the north.

Things are on the move!

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Quoting aquak9:
Yo, P, et al.

Sucked up a lotta moisture, this storm has, oh yea. Last night, midnite, NE Fla, creepy low clouds just RACING off to the NE. I know that kinda busy sky, means BIG BUSINESS elsewhere, clouds hauling a$$ like that means something's building a bomb.

Used to have friends in Scituate.


Woooo Aqua!


Yeah this thing is wrapping up something scary off of NC.

Eastern New England is going to get a hurricane wind wise for certain.

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
On radar, the rain/snow line is only about 5 miles South of me , over Long Island Sound. Think it will be here within the hour. TRP to answer your question, , Monroe should get 12-18" , probably on the higher end of that scale. Steady light snow still falling, 31.9F, Baro down to 30.04". NE winds 10-15mph, WHG.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Quoting Matlack:

P where are you as I'm at route 34 and 33 in Wall and it is just light to moderate rain here?


I'm east of there down Wycoff/Shafto.

I'm in the box between West Park Ave, Asbury Ave, and Wycoff/Shafto road/and the GSP.

Still a decent mix of rain with slushy flakes mixed in.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Sleet storm in Brooklyn. Still hasn't changed to rain. Temp at 33.8.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:

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