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Tar Balls, Tears #5

By: Beachfoxx, 3:09 AM GMT on June 11, 2010

Oil disaster quote of the day.
From a skimboarder in Perdido: <“We’re probably going to get cancer or grow an arm out of our face,” said Lane, 17 years old, pointing to small clumps of oil that had washed up on the sand. “It kind of sucks.”
Link

The Gulf of Mexico Sea Grant Programs

Gulf Oil Spill Tracker

Roff's Deepwater Horizone Oil Spill Disaster

NOAA Fishery Closures

The Oil Drum

PBS Live Feed & Ticker

Gulf Oil Blog

oil spill academicLink

Univ. of So. FL forecasts trajectory

2010 Tropical Cyclone Landfall Probabilities

The DESTIN LOG

Gulf Coast Air Quality

(tally of animals effected by oilspill)

The Destin Log

GEOPlatform Maps




Dismay at the Goo - Tarballs
Dismay at the Goo - Tarballs
Tar Goobers on Okaloosa Island
Tar Goobers on Okaloosa Island
Tar & Oil from the DWH spill spoil our beaches - it hit shoreline about 11:30 am CST today

The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

Reader Comments


One of two, one-ton masses of tarball material, that was recovered June 11, 2010, south of Perdido Pass, Florida, is seen on the deck of the liftboat Sailfish, a Vessel of Opportunity working in the largest oil spill response in U.S. history, June 11, 2010. U.S. President Barack Obama and top BP executives are set for a showdown over the Gulf of Mexico oil spill this week, as the likely damages bill piles more pressure on the oil giant's shares. Picture taken June 11, 2010.
One-ton tarball found in Gulf

Stokes Young says:The caption doesn't directly say this tarball consists of oil from the BP Deepwater Horizon spill, so we have called and emailed the Coast Guard to see what else they can tell us. They have promised to update us. When they do, we'll update you here.
NOAA and other agencies launched this today
Geoplatform


Link
Quoting auburn:

One of two, one-ton masses of tarball material, that was recovered June 11, 2010, south of Perdido Pass, Florida, is seen on the deck of the liftboat Sailfish, a Vessel of Opportunity working in the largest oil spill response in U.S. history, June 11, 2010. U.S. President Barack Obama and top BP executives are set for a showdown over the Gulf of Mexico oil spill this week, as the likely damages bill piles more pressure on the oil giant's shares. Picture taken June 11, 2010.
One-ton tarball found in Gulf

Stokes Young says:The caption doesn't directly say this tarball consists of oil from the BP Deepwater Horizon spill, so we have called and emailed the Coast Guard to see what else they can tell us. They have promised to update us. When they do, we'll update you here.


OMG that is the CREEPIEST! I swear its like that old fifties movie THE BLOB
Quoting twhcracker:


OMG that is the CREEPIEST! I swear its like that old fifties movie THE BLOB


Its worse...this is REAL...
Link Obama: 'Gathering up facts' on BP compensation
This is absolutely horrible, and in my opinion there is NO EXCUSE for oil to have gotten this far unnoticed and not acted upon. Quietwater Beach is 10 MILES from the Pensacola Pass. This is where people take their little children because it is so shallow and a great place for them to play. We were just out there a few hours ago and saw boats at Little Sabine opening and closing booms as boats went in and out. This is only about 1/2 mile from Quietwater. THIS INFURIATES ME. And I don't get mad easily.

from WEAR FB page, not on their main page

Bill Pearson oil has now washed ashore on the Sound Side of Pensacola Beach... Oil has been seen everywhere from Quietwater Beach west towards the Ft. Pickens gate. We'll show you what it's like and reaction from visitors and business owners alike, Monday on Ch3 News at 4 and 6pm
PColaDan ~ Well, as long as you're feeling like the top of your head's going to blow off, how about this?

BP & US Slow to Accept Dutch Expertise

Three days after the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico, the Dutch government offered to help. It was willing to provide ships outfitted with oil-skimming booms, and it proposed a plan for building sand barriers to protect sensitive marshlands.

The response from the Obama administration and BP, which are coordinating the cleanup: " The embassy got a nice letter from the administration that said, 'Thanks, but no thanks,' said Geert Visser, consul general for the Netherlands in Houston.
Now, almost seven weeks later, as the oil spewing from the battered well spreads across the Gulf and soils pristine beaches and coastline, BP and our government have reconsidered.

U.S. ships are being outfitted this week with four pairs of the skimming booms airlifted from the Netherlands and should be deployed within days. Each pair can process 5 million gallons of water a day, removing 20,000 tons of oil and sludge.

At that rate, how much more oil could have been removed from the Gulf during the past month?

The uncoordinated response to an offer of assistance has become characteristic of this disaster's response. Too often, BP and the government don't seem to know what the other is doing, and the response has seemed too slow and too confused.

Federal law has also hampered the assistance. The Jones Act, the maritime law that requires all goods be carried in U.S. waters by U.S.-flagged ships, has prevented Dutch ships with spill-fighting equipment from entering U.S. coastal areas.

"What's wrong with accepting outside help?" Visser asked. "If there's a country that's experienced with building dikes and managing water, it's the Netherlands."




Dan, Linda, you know this gets worse day by day, hour by hour. Dan, I don't know how you and Foxx and all the other bloggers that are in the thick of this horrible tragedy, are coping, I really do not.
BP storage tank from Deepwater Horizon washes ashore in Walton (Destin) (UPDATED with PHOTOS)
Link



507. Linda, I read somewhere that 17 countries have offered assistance - but all have been turned down.
Why?
There is something called the Jones Act or the Merchant Marine Act of 1920.
From Wiki:

The Merchant Marine Act of 1920 (P.L. 66-261) is a United States Federal statute that regulates maritime commerce in U.S. waters and between U.S. ports.
Section 27, also known as the Jones Act, deals with cabotage (i.e., coastal shipping) and requires that all goods transported by water between U.S. ports be carried in U.S.-flag ships, constructed in the United States, owned by U.S. citizens, and crewed by U.S. citizens and U.S. permanent residents. The purpose of the law is to support the U.S. merchant marine industry, but agricultural interests generally oppose it because, they contend, it raises the cost of shipping their goods, making them less competitive with foreign sources.

You can google it & get more info if you are so inclined.
Quoting robinvtx1215:
Dan, Linda, you know this gets worse day by day, hour by hour. Dan, I don't know how you and Foxx and all the other bloggers that are in the thick of this horrible tragedy, are coping, I really do not.


and of course
Beach - The Jones Act is referenced in the original article from the Houston Chronicle.

Since it seems to be irrelevant now that the Obama administration has decided to accept the help, I presume it could have been rendered irrelevant 50 days ago. ;-)

In fact, the law has been waived in the past.

Requests for waivers of certain provisions of the act are reviewed by the United States Maritime Administration on a case-by-case basis. Waivers have been granted in cases of national emergencies or in cases of strategic interest.

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff temporarily waived the U.S. Shipping Act for foreign vessels carrying oil and natural gas from September 1 to September 19, 2005.


Obviously, if the administration had chosen to do so they could have waived whatever regulations affected the Dutch shipping and gotten their help into our states.


Wife and I headed to Quietwater Beach. Have to see for myself what is going on.
BBL
Also as the riser has been cut once a hurricane appears the suction AND relief well drilling will stop.

If its busy it could put efforts to close the well into winter - quite far into it realistically.
In short BP will not be able to cover damages and with backed up inventory a real estate crisis is likely to ensue on the gulf coast. Mix in a seafood and tourism collapse and you have the makings of a regional economic crash.
Yes, Linda I saw the reference...
The reason we may see ships from other countries could be that they have a "waiver".
The French along with several countries who offered help were told no during the first days of this disaster.
Every day since the oil spew started I have questioned the logic of our leaders. : (
Quoting shoreacres:
Beach - The Jones Act is referenced in the original article from the Houston Chronicle.

Since it seems to be irrelevant now that the Obama administration has decided to accept the help, I presume it could have been rendered irrelevant 50 days ago. ;-)

I really don't understand it, since we have foreign-flagged vessels coming in to the Port of Houston daily. It makes no sense. I'm going to drop an email to Lou Vest, who's a Houston ship pilot, and ask him, just from curiosity.

Quoting JFLORIDA:
Also as the riser has been cut once a hurricane appears the suction AND relief well drilling will stop.

If its busy it could put efforts to close the well into winter - quite far into it realistically.


jimmy kimmel said it will be december and bp will make it look like a giant chimney and stop it up by luring santa claus into it.
wait. is that a different one in destin or is that the thing that washed up in panama city...
JFL,

Speaking of real estate, many of the gulf front properties are owned by people who DO NOT live on or near the Gulf. People from all 50 states own property here... so the impact will be nationwide. Many of those owners depend on the summer months for the vacation rental monies to help offset the expenses of ownership.
Quoting JFLORIDA:
In short BP will not be able to cover damages and with backed up inventory a real estate crisis is likely to ensue on the gulf coast. Mix in a seafood and tourism collapse and you have the makings of a regional economic crash.
Quoting JFLORIDA:
In short BP will not be able to cover damages and with backed up inventory a real estate crisis is likely to ensue on the gulf coast. Mix in a seafood and tourism collapse and you have the makings of a regional economic crash.


we already have a housing crisis now
Dan, let us know what you find....

I'm still trying to get to Perdido Key - hopefully on Wednesday.
Quoting PcolaDan:
Wife and I headed to Quietwater Beach. Have to see for myself what is going on.
BBL
Destin - just west of Pompano Joes.
Quoting twhcracker:
wait. is that a different one in destin or is that the thing that washed up in panama city...
we do twh and not much money to throw around - this could get really ugly.
Quoting JFLORIDA:
we do twh and not much money to throw around - this could get really ugly.

The way I am looking at it we dont have enought to cover this mess.
BP Oil Spill May Not Be Capped Until Christmas, Expert Warns
'Everyone should be prepared for worst-case scenario', says the head of oil consultancy group


"Saleri, who dealt personally with four blowouts during a career with Saudi Aramco and Chevron, said the BP fire and spill was the worst he had seen. He believes it may cause more damage than the Ixtoc I blowout 30 years ago, which is regarded as the most damaging of its kind."

Shep,

Don't step back - you provide good insight & info...
Quoting theshepherd:
Now see foxxy...every time I get political you ask me to temper my remarks.
So I step up one step and comply.
Now I see all these Anti Christ rants go unreproached.
I just took two steps back...

I'll hit the clock...
Ya'll don't need me here.

Post 507 Okay I just BLEW
Shore, I just want to bang my head against the wall
finished reading this and I want to cry

DiveSon did "journeymen" time in Belgium as part of his Dive schooling - this was long b/4 the Gulf Oil accident, he came back to the STATES in AWE of how well they maintained their equipment,all the state of the art equipment we don't have stateside, safety measures were better enforced as as well.

I know this was the article mentioned the Netherlands - but he saw their operations there as well - impeccable. they want to help us with the Levee's in NOLA (we know they work) that help was refused as well *sigh*
Quoting robinvtx1215:
Dan, Linda, you know this gets worse day by day, hour by hour. Dan, I don't know how you and Foxx and all the other bloggers that are in the thick of this horrible tragedy, are coping, I really do not.


we're numb
but there's a lot of anger lurking behind the numb
I do have the WORST migraine going today -- must be those fantasy margarita's I drank first thing this morning at Emmy's.

we can only hope ( the one good thing that came out of Pandora's box/jar when she opened it) this will exposed the players and the real game that's being played -- OIL RULES -- hard to distract us from that reality when the Gulf is filling up like a tub.

out for the evening
my stomach is acting up - Too Much OIL
anyone else think the gulf Coast visit was...more words

enough with the words ,plenty of time for that after the leak is stopped..
I have largely kept out of this and mostly for sake of preserving my own blissful denial.. but I just read this in the local news (AP article) and almost spit up a gizzard! Who the hell does he think he is kidding?!

THEODORE, Ala. -- In a newly optimistic tone, President Barack Obama promised Monday that "things are going to return to normal" along the stricken Gulf Coast and the region's fouled waters will be in even better shape than before the catastrophic BP oil spill.

He declared Gulf seafood safe to eat and said his administration is redoubling inspections and monitoring to make sure it stays that way. And his White House said Monday it had wrested apparent agreement from BP PLC to set up an independent, multibillion-dollar compensation fund for people and businesses suffering from the spill's effects.

He declared, "I am confident that we're going to be able to leave the Gulf Coast in better shape than it was before."


Rain, IF he believes his own propaganda, the only person he is kidding is himself. And perhaps a few among us who didn't get the critical thinking gene.
Rain - I know I heard it and thought, "let HIM eat seafood" Still trying to find the emails sent between BP and Halliburton a week before the blow out. One BP engineer warned, "This rig is a nightmare"

Okay if y'all want to vent: Go to this NBC link and SUBMIT your questions...its a start

Link

Off to Austin - be well - take care- prayers up.
Here is the full article if it hasn't already been linked.. geez don't these guys learn anything from those who have made asses out of themselves before them. maybe a new requirement for office to go down in a self-inflicted ball of shame.

Obama sees light ahead for oil-damaged Gulf Coast


I cannot believe an educated man could say this, nor believe it to be true.

Someone pass me the Kool-aide.

He declared, "I am confident that we're going to be able to leave the Gulf Coast in better shape than it was before."

Quoting Rainman32:
I have largely kept out of this and mostly for sake of preserving my own blissful denial.. but I just read this in the local news (AP article) and almost spit up a gizzard! Who the hell does he think he is kidding?!

THEODORE, Ala. -- In a newly optimistic tone, President Barack Obama promised Monday that "things are going to return to normal" along the stricken Gulf Coast and the region's fouled waters will be in even better shape than before the catastrophic BP oil spill.

He declared Gulf seafood safe to eat and said his administration is redoubling inspections and monitoring to make sure it stays that way. And his White House said Monday it had wrested apparent agreement from BP PLC to set up an independent, multibillion-dollar compensation fund for people and businesses suffering from the spill's effects.

He declared, "I am confident that we're going to be able to leave the Gulf Coast in better shape than it was before."


Well I'm just glad I never have liked seafood, Bara can have mine. Pass the steak knife, I'm going back to that happy place.

Happy Place?
I wanna go.........
Quoting Rainman32:
Well I'm just glad I never have liked seafood, Bara can have mine. Pass the steak knife, I'm going back to that happy place.

HAIL MARY FULL OF GRACE - HE NEEDS TO READ THIS BLOG - OMG, OMG
HE CAN BELIEVE HIS OWN WORDS?
- this is Bizarre, nothing less then Bizarre

I'm INCREDULOUS - does he think we are ALL IDIOT'S?
cause with all due respect, if he can believe his words, he's an idiot & if he doesn't believe his words.......they will serve to eat his soul

DISGUSTED
We're living 1984, Farenheit451, and Atlas Shrugged

I'm gnawing on a gizzard this evening. nite
Quoting Beachfoxx:
Happy Place?
I wanna go.........

You can always increase your latitude to a "happier place":)
Good and he should be held to it. Hes got a lot of work to do and is off to a very slow start.

As a matter of fact we are still sliding backwards at an incredible rate.
Unless he is about to pull out all the stops it wasnt a politically prudent thing to say.
Some will say those words were spoken by a politician eager to cover his own a**, lest someone else decide to give it a swift kick.
I say they were spoken by a delusional and self-absorbed person who still believes his words have "magical powers", that if he says it, it must be true.

I've always thought there would be trouble if Mr. Obama had to deal with the concrete realities of life. Well, the those realities are pushing back in a big way. That oil doesn't give a flip about his speeches, and the sooner he figures that out, the better off we'll all be. Too bad there wasn't someone in his administration with a willingness to stand up to him early on in this.

IMHO, of course.



"we" sounds like "me and BP" and I didn't vote for that.
ok, ya'll. Question. Gotta co-worker, I;ve mentioned before iin my blog, her hubby is military and getting transfered to Pensacola. They are in the market to spend about $250k on a house there, on the water. Gotta be on the water.

So they're looking all over Innerarity Island. The banks keep tossing them back thier offers.

Now i have googled this area like crazy, is this area safe from oil coming in? I mean yeah it's attached to the water in the gulf, but it looks like fairly protectd water.
Oil makes that sliding down that slope more slippery.....
Quoting JFLORIDA:
Good and he should be held to it. Hes got a lot of work to do and is off to a very slow start.

As a matter of fact we are still sliding backwards at an incredible rate.
Aqua,

I'll email you later.... I've sold many properties over there. The point is near Perdido Key.
Quoting aquak9:
ok, ya'll. Question. Gotta co-worker, I;ve mentioned before iin my blog, her hubby is military and getting transfered to Pensacola. They are in the market to spend about $250k on a house there, on the water. Gotta be on the water.

So they're looking all over Innerarity Island. The banks keep tossing them back thier offers.

Now i have googled this area like crazy, is this area safe from oil coming in? I mean yeah it's attached to the water in the gulf, but it looks like fairly protectd water.
For a minute there I thought I was on the wrong blog. I can't seem to find all the "Anti Christ rants". Oh well.

We went out to Quietwater Beach and it was beautiful. Clouds from the thunderstorm north of us had cooled things down. Kids were playing in the clean looking water and beaches. We went to 3 separate spots and saw no sign of oil. One of the primary places I look is in the seaweed wash ashore. I also saw NO cleaning crews there. Every place else I have been where there was tar/oil, there seems to be a permanent presence now. So I don't know what to make of the Quietwater Beach reports. The fact that there was a boat permanently at Little Sabine opening and closing the boom was suspicious to me this morning. It was still there this evening. And our local news does not seem to have and investigative team. So I guess here it's just wake up each morning to find out the latest news they didn't warn us about the night before. There was a lot of marine boat traffic, but I suspect that was for Obama's visit tomorrow.

edit to add: I'm guessing cleanup crews were on Quietwater earlier today and they were either gone or I just didn't see them this morning. But I wasn't exactly expecting anything there so we didn't stop there earlier today.
fox- pot 472, the yolo boarding, was beautiful. Poignant.
Yes, it brought tears to my eyes.... I just keep praying that the Dolphins find their way to safe waters. : )

YOLO
Quoting aquak9:
fox- pot 472, the yolo boarding, was beautiful. Poignant.
Dan,

Thank you! Thank you! There is nothing better than hearing the truth of a situation, when we all fear that we feel like we are getting hot air blown up our skirts!

Tomorrow - we pull our boat out of the water. A sad day indeed. We've worked hard to have the boat, and a home with a dock so that at the end of a hard days work, we could come home, hop on the boat & take a sunset cruise - wipe the stress of the day away. Now, the boat goes to a Dry Marina, 20 minutes + a toll away. We have to call an hour in advance for them to put it in the water.... and I won't even mention how much its going to cost in dollars. (and w/ the economics of the past few years and now the oil spill my income has almost dried up to nothing). However, mostly its costing us dearly in emotions and heartache. Whenever times have been difficult, through loss, or other hardships; we've always had the boat to "take us away or to bring us peace". It has been our refuge; I spent almost a year and a half on that the boat or the beach, the ONLY places where I could find any peace. I know it seems silly in the big scheme of things, but taking the boat out of the water & putting her in a giant metal impersonal building is going to be very hard on both my husband and me. Its like we are turning our back on an old friend... That boat is 12 years old, but she looks new - we baby her. It feels like we are deceiving her.... and not by choice. BP we are angry, frustrated, sad and confused by your recklessness, by your destruction of our waters, our lives and or livelihoods - Fix the problem & do it quickly.
BF, I feel so bad for you. I know what the boat means to you. That's just awful. I figured you would have more time, much more.

On another note, you ladies are starting to give me a gender identification crisis. First aqua (you'll have to ask her) and now you. "...we feel like we are getting hot air blown up our skirts!". That's never been my thing. And I didn't get the kilt while I was in Scotland. :)
ROFL -

Guess I should have said hot air up our gender neutral clothing! LOL

Yep, Dan - having a hard time knowing the boat is going to be across the bay... The lil' boat that we bought for Jeremiah will still be here - but once oil is in our waters - it will not get wet. Too much sentimental value in that sweet little boat to risk damage....
The heartache never ends for those of us who love these beaches & waterways, BP has changed our lives - forever. : (
Quoting PcolaDan:
BF, I feel so bad for you. I know what the boat means to you. That's just awful. I figured you would have more time, much more.

On another note, you ladies are starting to give me a gender identification crisis. First aqua (you'll have to ask her) and now you. "...we feel like we are getting hot air blown up our skirts!". That's never been my thing. And I didn't get the kilt while I was in Scotland. :)
Oil disaster quote of the day.
From a skimboarder in Perdido: <“We’re probably going to get cancer or grow an arm out of our face,” said Lane, 17 years old, pointing to small clumps of oil that had washed up on the sand. “It kind of sucks.”
Link
So let's all continue working together to learn from accidents like this. . . [and] "take care to avoid making a very bad situation even worse by succumbing to the shortsighted passions of misguided political expediency.


People are on to them.

Beach: I've avoided posting here, you know I read it daily. My heart is so breaking for you all there!

I watched Huckabee the other night (not getting political) and he had a GREAT # of folks on there with solutions to take care of the oil but seems EPA is involved in many of those solutions and you know what that means!

In and now out!
BP Official Admits to Damage BENEATH THE SEA FLOOR

On May 31st, the Washington Post noted:

Sources at two companies involved with the well said that BP also discovered new damage inside the well below the seafloor and that, as a result, some of the drilling mud that was successfully forced into the well was going off to the side into rock formations.

"We discovered things that were broken in the sub-surface," said a BP official who spoke on the condition of anonymity. He said that mud was making it "out to the side, into the formation."



As noted yesterday in The Engineer magazine, an official from Cameron International - the manufacturer of the blowout preventer for BP's leaking oil drilling operation - noted that one cause of the failure of the BOP could have been damage to the well bore:

Steel casing or casing hanger could have been ejected from the well and blocked the operation of the rams.

The real doomsday scenario here is if that casing gives up, and it does come through the other strings of pipe. Remember, it is concentric pipe that holds this well together. If it comes into the formation, basically, youve got uncontrolled [oil] flow to the sea floor. And that is the doomsday scenario.

Cavner also said BP must "keep the well flowing to minimize oil and gas going out into the formation on the side"


Senator Bill Nelson (D-FL): Andrea were looking into something new right now, that theres reports of oil thats seeping up from the seabed which would indicate, if thats true, that the well casing itself is actually pierced underneath the seabed. So, you know, the problems could be just enormous with what were facing.


I think that is the reason we are seeing all the weird numbers. We are in a Doomsday Scenario.

I hope gas doesn't build up on the surface.
So within that context - if he pushes it we could see a better off gulf. One that ends up in better shape than before this.
I think if this can be made to spur on action that rids us of fossil fuels even partially it will negate some of the terrible things that have happened.

I dont think bad things "happen for a reason" thats silly - but I think good reasons can be attached to bad things to negate their negative forces and bring more good into existence.

Post559 - thanks for the information - GROAN - I think I'm going to skip sending that article to Diveson's Girlfriend.

Geeze, can't believe my kid is out in that mess *sigh*

very frustrating not to have any communication w/him & not even be sure what boat he's on - we think it's the MightyServantIII, but I can't find it on this site....Link
I tried looking for it in that video - but I'm not sure

LOL - he's 23and I'm still running around the Gulf looking for him...... ahhhh he's my Sagittarius
I'm leaving something positive here this morning - it's a bit woo-woo,before you dismiss it, check out this Japanese Dr.'s background - you may learn a few things about water you never knew before.

Dr. Masaru Emoto -The Hidden Messages in Water is an eye-opening theory showing how water is deeply connected to people's individual and collective consciousness. Drawing from his own research, scientific researcher, healer, and popular lecturer Dr. Masaru Emoto describes the ability of water to absorb, hold, and even retransmit human feelings and emotions. Using high-speed photography, he found that crystals formed in frozen water reveal changes when specific, concentrated thoughts are directed toward it. Music, visual images, words written on paper, and photographs also have an impact on the crystal structure. Emoto theorizes that since water has the ability to receive a wide range of frequencies, it can also reflect the universe in this manner. He found that water from clear springs and water exposed to loving words shows brilliant, complex, and colorful snowflake patterns, while polluted water and water exposed to negative thoughts forms incomplete, asymmetrical patterns with dull colors. Emoto believes that since people are 70 percent water, and the Earth is 70 percent water, we can heal our planet and ourselves by consciously expressing love and goodwill.



Right now, most of us have the predominantly angry emotion when we consider what is happening in the Gulf. And while certainly we are justified in that emotion, we may be of greater assistance to our planet and its life forms, if we sincerely, powerfully and humbly pray the prayer that Dr Emoto, himself, has proposed.

"I send the energy of love and gratitude to the water and all the living creatures in the Gulf of Mexico and its surroundings.
To the whales, dolphins, pelicans, fish, shellfish, plankton, coral, algae, and all living creatures . . . I am sorry.
Please forgive me.
Thank you.
I love you. "

I am are passing this request to people who I believe might be willing to participate in this prayer, to set an intention of love and healing that is so large, so overwhelming that we can perform a miracle in the Gulf of Mexico.
We are not powerless. We are powerful. Our united energy, speaking this prayer daily...multiple times daily....can literally shift the balance of destruction that is happening.

We don't have to know how......we just have to recognize that the power of love is greater than any power active in the Universe today.

Please join in, often repeating this healing prayer of of Dr. Emoto's, or your own special words - thx for the Head'sUp Aqua!!!!
And feel free to copy and paste this to send it around the planet.
Let's take charge, and do our own clean up!

And so it is! Pass it on.
* * * * * * * * * * * *
Surfmom ~

Do you have the link to VesselTraffic.com?

I don't see the name you mentioned on the list, but if they aren't registered they don't show. On the other hand, if he mentions another ship you may be able to pinpoint him.
Shore!! Thx - that was the link I was trying to remember : )

you also mentioned something to me my young son was patiently trying to explain to me last evening... he said if the ship is not registered it won't show, and because of the type of ship, it may well not be.....

least now, if/when I speak with diveson I'll ask what boats are near by (Big thanks!)
morning all. Thank you for all the updates and news from everywhere.

surfmom- I'm not one to recite pre-written words created by a human,,,but the words and prayers will be the same, heartfelt, and true.

jflorida-I dont think bad things "happen for a reason" thats silly - but I think good reasons can be attached to bad things to negate their negative forces and bring more good into existence.
that's, like, one of the wisest things I've ever heard you say.

Interviewer: Are they gonna close the beaches?
Coast Guard: I don't know.
Interviewer: SHOULD they close the beaches?
Coast Guard: I don't know.
2nd Interviewer: Would you let your children swim in it?
Coast Guard: HELL NO!!!


'nuff said.
Good point Aqua!! - I rewrote that sentence in my post too read: "or your own special words" Truly it's about Intent & like you, I prefer to express my own personal msg.

Good Day to all who visit here.
BP Engineer Called Deepwater Horizon 'Nightmare Well' Days Before Blast, Oil Spill




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Those "freedom loving, roaming Sagittarius", they do keep Mothers on their toes! hahaha

LOL - he's 23and I'm still running around the Gulf looking for him...... ahhhh he's my Sagittarius
all thoughts are prayers
G'morning all....

Surf, I loved what Dr. Emoto says - but we already knew in our hearts that "we are connected to the waters". : )

Lots of local news - will post it a little later. The tree trimmers just showed up - got to cut those tress back before a storm hits! Once they get started I'll come back in and post a couple of links.
The POTUS is still on the coast --- but I don't think he's seeing "the big picture" nor do I believe he understands the scope of the damage being done to the fragile eco-system, economy, etc... His words hit a wrong nerve when he said,

"I am confident that we're going to be able to leave the Gulf Coast in better shape than it was before."
post 574-- GOOD FOR THEM!!!
Morning.

"I am confident that we're going to be able to leave the Gulf Coast in better shape than it was before."

I believe the guy, unfortunately there will be a lot of suffering, of all types, before the job is done. .. When will it be done, 5 maybe 10 years at best !!
MissNadia,

I think it will take much longer than 5 - 10 years.
The sealife, the birds, the eco-system is being damaged in ways we do not understand.

The Oil Drum continues to have great info....
The Oil Drum
The Misdirected BP Boycott
By RON LIEBER

Chris Pizzello/Associated Press
Does boycotting BP make sense?
In this week’s “Your Money” column, I spot an oddity in the conversation about how we all ought to react to the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico: Greenpeace doesn’t think you should boycott BP.

How can that be? The gasoline business is complicated. Fuel at a BP station may come from a different company entirely, with the BP additives mixed in to the gasoline only at the very last moment before it’s trucked to the highway rest stop.

Meanwhile, if you pass by a BP station and burn some fossil fuels driving down the road to fill up elsewhere, you may end up at a retailer that gets all of its gasoline from BP. The retailer won’t tell you that though. (Some of them wouldn’t tell me either, as you’ll see in the column. Hi Kroger! Paging Costco executives!!) And the people who work at the gas station probably don’t know either.

Boycotting is easy. That’s why so many people like to do it. Lowering demand for fuel, thereby delivering a true blow to big oil for those who are so inclined, is much harder. It requires sacrifice. Colder homes and offices. Driving more slowly. Buying a smaller car. Avoiding or delaying a move to the suburbs that necessitates more hours behind the wheel.

At least that’s how I see it. How about you?
Nearshore Trajectory Estimate Beached Oil for 16-JUNE-10 at 1200 CDT

X =
Potential Beached Oil

Foxx, any sign of oil at your place today ???
No, not that I see from house, getting ready to go down to boat - got to get it ready to go to the dry marina. : (
Chain saws buzzing - lots of noise here... will check water condition & be back in a bit.
Quoting MissNadia:
Foxx, any sign of oil at your place today ???
I hope they can save the Choctawatchee Bay. Good for them, to go ahead, screw the red tape, and maybe save the waters in the bay.

at least for a while...
as you take the boat, foxx...remember a day I sat in the front, so many robs and versions of roberts...That day was like Paradise for me, never thought i'd have so many loved ones around me, on the water, fresh breeze in my hair.


And our hairs all got tassled, and the blue waters splashed. We got windblown, then idled back slowly...we played at your stairs, and splashed under the dock.

POST 574 - AT LAST - GOOOOOOD NEWS - STAND UP & CHEER
Greed Explains the Disasters and the Lying Afterwards SpeakEasy
(This post is by Leo W. Gerard, international president of the United Steelworkers and by Cecil Roberts, international president of the United Mine Workers of America)

As oil mucked the Gulf of Mexico and families mourned 11 dead rig workers, BP officials proclaimed that the corporation%u2019s priority always was safety.
This tracked the tack taken by Massey Energy, whose officials also declared safety was paramount after an explosion in the corporation%u2019s Upper Big Branch mine killed 29 workers.
CEOs commonly make such incongruous assertions to protect profits after corporate-caused disasters. They%u2019re driven by the same factor that is fundamental to the catastrophes %u2013 greed.
Nothing wrong with that, right? Not in a society that has converted greed from a vice to a virtue. Not in the place that inspired the book, %u201CGreed is Good: The Capitalist Pig Guide to Investing.%u201D Surely it%u2019s no problem in the land where %u201CGreed%u201D has its own game show on Fox and where Ayn Rand, the %u201Cmoney-is-the-root-of-all-good%u201D philosopher, reigns as Republican queen long after her death.
Americans worship God on the Sabbath and the rich every other day. Billionaire Warren Buffett%u2019s word is investment gospel. Americans gave Wall Street banksters hundreds of billions in bailout money protecting their multi-million dollar bonuses. But in the midst of the Great Recession caused by Wall Street recklessness, America has repeatedly delayed renewal of unemployment benefits and now is terminating federal health insurance support for the furloughed middle class.
Middle class workers are the ones who die in coal mines and on oil rigs.
Afterwards, CEOs say anything to save the bottom line %u2013 the one that will determine their bonuses.
Discussing the Upper Big Branch Mine disaster, Massey CEO Don Blankenship told stock analysts in a conference call late in April:
%u201CSome of the implications have been that we don%u2019t focus on safety or we put dollars in front of safety and nothing could be further from the truth.%u201D
Though the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) issued 1,342 safety violation notices to Upper Big Branch over the past five years, Blankenship explained that%u2019s just life in the coal business:
%u201CViolations are unfortunately a normal part of the mining process.%u201D
In addition, Blankenship said the titles of two Massey programs proved safety was supreme:
%u201CThe naming of those two programs speaks for itself: S1 %u2013 safety is job one; P2 %u2013 production is job 2. That%u2019s been the case for my entire tenure.%u201D
Still, 29 miners are dead. And dozens died at Massey mines in the past decade. Three died at Upper Big Branch between 1998 and 2010. The Massey dead include two workers who suffocated in a mine run by Massey subsidiary Aracoma Coal Co. on Jan. 19, 2006, just three months after Blankenship issued a memo ordering underlings to produce coal to the exclusion of other activities, such as building ventilation systems called overcasts. Aracoma officials pleaded guilty in December, 2008, to removing and failing to replace ventilation devices, the lack of which contributed to the suffocation deaths.
And Massey workers aren%u2019t as sure as Don Blanekship that safety is job one. Several spoke to NPR about it. Teddy Cole, who worked a dozen years at Upper Big Branch, said Blankenship prioritizes production:
%u201CIt%u2019s supposed to be safety first, but to me, it was production first.%u201D
Former co-worker Brian Jerral agreed:
%u201CA lot of times, it%u2019s production first and safety third.%u201D
Adam Vance, who worked at two Massey mines, described a culture of greed:
%u201CThey cover [themselves] with their safety meetings, but the main thing Massey%u2019s out for is to get that all-mighty dollar. If the coal ain%u2019t running, they ain%u2019t making no money.%u201D
And it%u2019s a lot of money for Massey $1.02 million a day in 2008.
Massey miner Ricky Lee Campbell 24, of Beckley, W.Va., told reporters about his safety concerns on April 7. Massey suspended him a week later, then fired him. He has filed a federal whistle-blower complaint.
Similar to Massey, BP officials claim safety is job one.
Shortly after BP named Tony Hayward CEO in 2007, he told the Houston Chronicle:
%u201CI think we have the opportunity to set a new benchmark in industrial safety. . .We have to have a work environment where people don%u2019t get injured or killed, period.%u201D
That was significant since an explosion two years earlier had killed 15 workers and injured another 170 at BP%u2019s Texas City, Texas oil refinery, and federal regulators blamed the catastrophe in part on cost cuts initiated by Hayward%u2019s predecessor. The following year, BP admitted oil leaks into Alaska%u2019s Prudhoe Bay were caused partly by cost cutting.
Despite Hayward%u2019s safety assertions, another 11 workers are dead. And survivors told CNN that PB routinely cut corners and pushed production despite potential safety problems. They also told CNN co-workers had been fired for raising concerns about dangerous practices that could delay drilling if remedied and that BP had insisted on an unsual process shortcut on the day of the blast.
Immediately after the rig explosion, BP contended its under-Gulf pipe was spewing only 1,000 barrels of oil a day. Fairly quickly, it revised that estimate to 5,000 barrels, but continued to refuse to make public its live video of the oil-churning pipe.
After a freedom of information request and Congressional pressure forced BP to release the video, federal officials estimated as much as 40,000 barrels are being discharged daily.
Still, BP%u2019s Hayward flatly denied the existence of underwater oil plumes, saying:
%u201CThe oil is on the surface. There aren%u2019t any plumes.%u201D
And he discounted the effect of the unleashed oil on the environment:
%u201CThe Gulf of Mexico is a very big ocean. The amount of volume of oil and dispersant we are putting into it is tiny in relation to the total water volume.%u201D
Hayward had a good (greed-based) reason to deny access to the video, discount the amount of oil spewing into the sea and defy the assessment of government and university researchers who confirmed the plumes of dispersed oil stretching for miles beneath the ocean surface. BP will be fined based on the number of barrels of oil its well disgorges into the gulf %u2013 somewhere between $1,100 and $4,300 a barrel depending on whether the government can prove gross negligence.
David Leonhardt, an economics columnist for the New York Times, described BP%u2019s Texas City, Gulf of Mexico and Alaska crises this way:
%u201CMuch of this indifference stemmed from an obsession with profits, come what may.%u201D
Greed.
It%u2019s one of the seven deadly sins. When it afflicts corporate CEOs, it%u2019s deadly to workers.
Honest profit is fine. But it%u2019s perverse to celebrate greed, to elevate it over human life.
Leo W. Gerard, International President of the United Steelworkers (USW), was elected in October, 2009, to his second full term since taking office in 2001. Under Gerard, the union%u2019s executive board launched a nationwide mobilization to gain congressional support for health insurance reform, the Employee Free Choice Act, and the stimulus bill including a %u2018Buy American%u2019 provision. In 2008, he signed a merger agreement with the UK-based manufacturing union Unite, creating the first trans-Atlantic union -- Workers Uniting. The USW, the largest manufacturing union in North America, has won important trade cases to protect members%u2019 jobs, including the 2009 case that imposed tariffs on Chinese tires. Gerard serves on the AFL-CIO's Executive Council.
United State Library of Medicine

There are some excellent links on this site, here are a few listed (you'll have to go to site for actual links)
Crude Oil Spills and Health


Featured Sites
Overview
Occupational Hazards Related to Oil Spills and Burning Crude Oil
Dispersants
Seafood and Fisheries Contamination
Response and Recovery
Gulf State Agencies Involved in Prevention, Response, and Recovery
Oil Spills and Wildlife
Social Media Sites: Gulf Oil Spill
Resources from the National Library of Medicine
Multi-language Resources
Disclaimer
My friend's son, a Harbor Master in Tampa, has explained to me several reasons why we are not finding MightyServant on the ship tracking maps....

Security
Flying under a Foreign Flag are just two

all makes sense - just have to keep looking at all the video's carefully

in the meantime - I think this will be my tune for the day - today my mind is filled with memories of both of us dressing up & playing pirates.
Link BP gets OK to burn off captured oil, gas at sea
MissNadia,

The water is clear,
so clear I can see the bait fish,
the the infant mullet and other fish swimming under our dock.
I can see about 5 - 6 feet down to the bottom... There are schools of fishing swimming all about. The water is beautiful & flat, a perfect day for what could be:
The Last Voyage.
Why is the Coast Guard blocking news cameras?

585. aquak9
ohhhhh, what wondrous memories!
That was a special day,
A boat filled with special friends,
A bunch of WUBA's
sharing the glories of our special Choctawatchee Bay.
: )
593. SeaWitch, did you watch the video in my header?


Florida Healthy Beaches Program


To review the beach water sampling results for reporting counties, click on a county name on the map or in the table below. Each county page also has a link to data collected since August 2000.

***They are not testing for toxicity from the dispersents or if they are I cannot find the results of those tests***
Quoting aquak9:
I hope they can save the Choctawatchee Bay. Good for them, to go ahead, screw the red tape, and maybe save the waters in the bay.

at least for a while...


the coastal dune lakes, very rare and precious, are a big concern too.
i love choctawhatchee bay. i started a poem about it somewhere. will try and find it
They blocked the access from the GOM to the coastal dune lakes a week or so ago.
Quoting twhcracker:


the coastal dune lakes, very rare and precious, are a big concern too.
here is my poem i wrote about choctawhatchee bay one morning:

Choctaw Bay

Misting clouds dark, whispering, a soft feathering over Choctaw bay
Like an old woman’s hand curling and gathering up a handful of silk
The whisper of her dry silky skin
The whisper of mist streaking, soft slants of daybreak rain
Over Choctaw bay
It was here, the clouds were here, before the bridge
Before we were born
The old woman’s fingers unfurled and the silk spilled free
Over Choctaw bay
Cracker,

That is beautiful.....
and if I'm not mistaken approx. 40% of BP stock is owned by Americans.
here is a poem about england i just wrote:

nevermind!
Quoting Beachfoxx:
No! The people of England did not do this.... and if I'm not mistaken approx. 40% of BP stock is owned by Americans.


i know, i am so bad. I should not be mad at england
i apologize to you all for my poetry good and bad :)
Yep, You are being a bad girl! could you remove those comments before we ALL get in trouble!
beachfoxx can you unquote my bad quote?
Quoting mobal:
I sure hope this is bull!

This will allow the water, under the intense pressure at 1 mile deep, to be forced into the hole and the cavity where the oil was. The temperature at that depth is near 400 degrees, possibly more.

The water will be vaporized and turned into steam, creating an enormous amount of force, lifting the Gulf floor. It is difficult to know how much water will go down to the core and therefore, its not possible to fully calculate the rise of the floor.

The tsunami wave this will create will be anywhere from 20 to 80 feet high, possibly more. Then the floor will fall into the now vacant chamber. This is how nature will seal the hole.


what??! omg.
Quoting Beachfoxx:
593. SeaWitch, did you watch the video in my header?



I just now watched it. It's unbelievable that the Coast Guard seems to be blocking news about this and not getting the information out. There are rumors flying around that Ship Island has been soaked in oil. One of the Vessels of Opportunity captains I spoke with said that Horn Island is really bad but the news keeps saying these islands are clear.

Frankly, I don't know what to believe. I know one thing for sure, more oiled covered birds are popping up in Mississippi beaches and more dead sea turtles are washing up. I'm wondering if we in Mississippi are seeing some of the effects of the underwater plumes and/or a mixture of the dispersed oil.

I know it spots, the beaches here are being stained redder as the days go by and some areas are being stained black.

609, Mobal - that is scary stuff...

O.k. - ya'll behave & play nice.

Its time to board the boat for the
Last Voyage.

: (
BP Clouds Already Onshore! Benzene-3400ppb & Hyrdrogen Sulfide-1200ppb TOXIC AIR ALERT
Delay at the dock - LOL

The tree trimmers are not finished...

Happy Birthday to twhcracker - the big 60?
614. surfmom -
Geez, Surf - that is not good news. Will this nightmare ever end?

Oh ***Crash*** I think a limb just hit the house!
post 609 - Geeze Mobal - I want to thank you for the information - but it made me sick to read it.....

is this a credible site? - seemed like it....
no words...
618. mobal
I dont know...

Quoting surfmom:
post 609 - Geeze Mobal - I want to thank you for the information - but it made me sick to read it.....

is this a credible site? - seemed like it....
no words...
Quoting surfmom:
post 609 - Geeze Mobal - I want to thank you for the information - but it made me sick to read it.....

is this a credible site? - seemed like it....
no words...


WWL news in New Orleans is very good source for news, especially the oil spill and hurricanes.
I just read about the possibility of the well and the BOP being comprised at The Oil Drum:

The guy who wrote the article states that the well itself may be degrading and if that's the case the BOP may eventually collapse. There is already evidence that the BOP is tilting which means the supports for it in the well bed are comprised.

Scary, horrifying, and terrifying:

All of these things lead to only one place, a fully wide open well bore directly to the oil deposit...after that, it goes into the realm of "the worst things you can think of" The well may come completely apart as the inner liners fail. There is still a very long drill string in the well, that could literally come flying out...as I said...all the worst things you can think of are a possibility, but the very least damaging outcome as bad as it is, is that we are stuck with a wide open gusher blowing out 150,000 barrels a day of raw oil or more. There isn't any "cap dome" or any other suck fixer device on earth that exists or could be built that will stop it from gushing out and doing more and more damage to the gulf. While at the same time also doing more damage to the well, making the chance of halting it with a kill from the bottom up less and less likely to work, which as it stands now?....is the only real chance we have left to stop it all.
.....
We need to prepare for the possibility of this blow out sending more oil into the gulf per week then what we already have now, because that is what a collapse of the system will cause. All the collection efforts that have captured oil will be erased in short order. The magnitude of this disaster will increase exponentially by the time we can do anything to halt it and our odds of actually even being able to halt it will go down.

The magnitude and impact of this disaster will eclipse anything we have known in our life times if the worst or even near worst happens...

We are seeing the puny forces of man vs the awesome forces of nature.
We are going to need some luck and a lot of effort to win...
and if nature decides we ought to lose, we will....


If it has been posted before my apologies.

G-d help us all.
Another doomsday thought !!!

609. mobal 11:33 AM EDT on June 15, 2010
I sure hope this is bull!

If something were to go wrong with the well pipe, I would be very afraid of leaking methane gas. It would expand as it came to the surface in a huge bubble, might even cause ships to sink, it could explode in a huge bomb like blast or, last but not least, the gas could suffocate people on the ships !!

Quoting Beachfoxx:
Delay at the dock - LOL

The tree trimmers are not finished...

Happy Birthday to twhcracker - the big 60?

Action: Quote | Ignore User


ha ha yep! i cant believe it! me!
oh no oh no oh no, pensacola pass! omg.
Dan -

That's terrible news, but not surprising.
One thing we all know is if there is a missing shingle on our roof, rain water will find a way in - so the best we can hope for is to is to keep as much oil out of waterways, but I fear it will find those "missing shingles" and seep its way in....
Quoting PcolaDan:
PENSACOLA PASS - Tonight... A huge plume of oil... has made it through Pensacola Pass... It's floating just about a mile from downtown.
Post 620 - nature has her laws, when they are broken there doesn't seem to be much chance of mercy.
*arghh* it's horrible witnessing this....

heading out to shake the macadamia nut tree and seize the nuts b/4 the squirrels get them all...I have the chubbiest squirrels around....
Dan,

Don't know if you saw Destin's plan. Link

Okaloosa defies Unified Command over East Pass plans (VIDEOS, PHOTOS)

DESTIN — Okaloosa County isn’t taking oil spill orders any more.

County commissioners voted unanimously to give their emergency management team the power to take whatever action it deems necessary to prevent oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill from entering Choctawhatchee Bay through the East Pass.

President Obama tours Pensacola Beach. »

Is this oil? You decide. »

View BP's live feed of the runaway oil well. »

View Monday's oil spill photos. »

That means the team, led by Public Safety Director Dino Villani, can take whatever action it sees fit to protect the pass without having its plans approved by state or federal authorities.

Commission chairman Wayne Harris said he and his fellow commissioners made their unanimous decision knowing full well they could be prosecuted for it.

“We made the decision legislatively to break the laws if necessary. We will do whatever it takes to protect our county’s waterways and we’re prepared to go to jail to do it,” he said.

That freed Villani to take several actions deemed important to further armor the Destin pass without waiting for authorization from the state Emergency Operations Center in Tallahassee and the unified spill command in Mobile.

Commissioners gave him the go-ahead to spend $200,000 to pay for an underwater “air curtain” designed to push oil up where it can be collected and $16,500 a day to operate and maintain it.

He has authority to, without a nod from the U.S. Coast Guard, deploy barges, weighted so that they’ll sit low in the water across the entrance to the pass.

He is also authorized to look into a slip curtain, another underwater oil-catching device.

Though they now have the authority, both Villani and Okaloosa County Administrator Jim Curry said they will continue to work with the state and federal authorities to get their plans approved.

Curry said what the commissioners did Monday was “send a loud and clear message” to the Coast Guard, the state Department of Environmental Protection and others that Okaloosa County’s permit requests should be acted on immediately.

The commission met in an emergency meeting alongside the Destin City Council. The two governing bodies confronted a full room of obviously frustrated people, many of whom advocated filling in the entrance of the pass to close it down completely.

It was agreed that filling in the pass was a bad idea that could have serious environmental impacts.

Jay Prothro, BP’s representative for Okaloosa County, and two representatives of the Coast Guard were also present.

While Martha LaGuardia, a commander with the Coast Guard, argued that moving ideas and plans through the chain of command was the proper way to do things, Harris made it known the County Commission was tired of the often tedious and sometimes unproductive bureaucracy.

“We’ve played the game. We’re done playing the game,” he said.
Florida to get its own oil spill chief

Florida, Alabama and Mississippi will each get its own deputy incident commander to lead oil response and cleanup efforts.



***Did they really have another choice? The locals are the only ones who really understand the waterways - I'm glad that Okaloosa County is moving forward. ***

SAVE OUR BEACHES & OUR WATERWAYS - do whatever it takes!
Swiss firm touts oil-absorbing fabric for US oil spill Link
VIDEO:

Oil Seeping from Ocean floor

Link
Fire halts oil collection

UPDATE 2:50 p.m. ET: BP has issued a statement:
At approximately 9:30 am CDT, a small fire was observed at the top of the derrick on the Discoverer Enterprise. The fire was quickly extinguished. The preliminary view is that the fire was caused by a lightning strike.
There were no injuries. All procedures were followed and, as a precaution, the LMRP containment operation was shut-down. All safety shut-down systems operated as designed.
Final safety and operational assurance inspections are underway and operations are expected to recommence this afternoon.
UPDATE 2:39 p.m. ET: BP says the small fire started about 10:30 a.m. ET and was quickly contained. No one was injured, and collection of oil is expected to resume this afternoon, the company says.
UPDATE 2:36 p.m. ET: The Associated Press follows with an alert saying the fire was caused by a lightning strike.
609

I dont think that is particularly possible - but the sea floor could have a fissure open - which is unlikely as this deposit is so deep under rock.

More of a danger is to workers in the area of the drilling by a buildup of gas on the surface and all the petroleum volatiles up there.
Washington - Based on updated information and scientific assessments, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar, and Chair of the National Incident Command%u2019s Flow Rate Technical Group (FRTG) Dr. Marcia McNutt (Director of the U.S. Geological Survey) today announced an improved estimate of how much oil is flowing from the leaking BP well.
Secretary Chu, Secretary Salazar, and Dr. McNutt convened a group of federal and independent scientists on Monday to discuss new analyses and data points obtained over the weekend to produce updated flow rate estimates. Working together, U.S. government and independent scientists estimate that the most likely flow rate of oil today is between 35,000 and 60,000 barrels per day. The improved estimate is based on more and better data that is now available and that helps increase the scientific confidence in the accuracy of the estimate.
At the direction of the federal government, BP is implementing multiple strategies to significantly expand the leak containment capabilities at the sea floor even beyond the upper level of today%u2019s improved estimate. The Lower Marine Riser Package (LMRP) cap that is currently in place can capture up to 18,000 barrels of oil per day. At the direction of the federal government, BP is deploying today a second containment option, called the Q4000, which could expand total leak containment capacity to 20,000-28,000 barrels per day. Overall, the leak containment strategy that BP was required to develop projects containment capacity expanding to 40,000-53,000 barrels per day by the end of June and 60,000-80,000 barrels per day by mid-July.
%u201CThis estimate brings together several scientific methodologies and the latest information from the sea floor, and represents a significant step forward in our effort to put a number on the oil that is escaping from BP%u2019s well,%u201D said Energy Secretary Steven Chu. %u201CAs we continue to collect additional data and refine these estimates, it is important to realize that the numbers can change. In particular, the upper number is less certain %u2013 which is exactly why we have been planning for the worst case scenario at every stage and why we are continuing to focus on responding to the upper end of the estimate, plus additional contingencies.%u201D

Today%u2019s improved flow rate estimate brings together the work of several scientific teams and is based on a combination of analyses of high resolution videos taken by ROVs, acoustic technologies, and measurements of oil collected by the oil production ship together with pressure measurements inside the top hat. Over the weekend, at the insistence of Secretary Chu and the science team, pressure meters were added to the top hat to assist with these estimates.
The scientists stressed the need for continued and refined pressure measurement, but emphasized that today%u2019s improved estimates have a greater degree of confidence than estimates that were possible prior to the riser cut. There are several reasons for this, including:
More and different kinds of data is available now: The improved estimates are informed by newly available, detailed pressure measurements from within the Top Hat taken over the past 24 hours. In addition, scientists could draw on more than a week of data about the amount of oil being collected through the top hat.
A single flow is easier to estimate: Prior to the riser cut, oil was flowing both from the end of the riser and from several different holes in the riser kink. This made estimates %u2013 particularly based on two dimensional video alone %u2013 more difficult.
%u201CWe need to have accurate and scientifically grounded oil flow rate information both for the purposes of the response and recovery and for the final investigation of the failure of the blowout preventer and the resulting spill,%u201D said Interior Secretary Salazar. %u201CThis estimate, which we will continue to refine as the scientific teams get new data and conduct new analyses, is the most comprehensive estimate so far of how much oil is flowing one mile below the ocean%u2019s surface.%u201D
%u201CEach of the methodologies that the scientific teams is using has its advantages and shortcomings, which is why it is so important that the scientific teams have taken several approaches to solving this problem,%u201D said Dr. McNutt. %u201CUnder the leadership of Admiral Allen, we will continue to revise and refine the flow rate estimate as our scientific teams get new data and conduct additional analyses.%u201D
The FRTG was assembled at the direction of National Incident Commander Admiral Thad Allen, and is led by United States Geological Survey Director Dr. Marcia McNutt. The FRTG, and a scientific team led by Energy Secretary Steven Chu, continue to analyze new data and use several scientific methodologies to develop updated estimates of how much oil is flowing from BP%u2019s leaking oil well in the Gulf of Mexico.
saw kevin costner on tv. he seems sincere. maybe his idea could help?
Okaloosa County. I've said all along the locals need to take things into their own hands. Unfortunately Escambia County government is just a bunch of finger pointers and whiners. Just look at all the crap over the Maritime Park here.
I love the idea of the bubble curtain. If in fact the oil is entering the bay underwater, then floating to the top, this may be the answer.
Betting Navarre is glad they didn't get the pass to the GoM approved now. ;)
638. IKE
35,000 to 60,000 barrels a day coming out of that oil volcano.

Collecting 15,000 barrels a day.

That leaves 20,000 to 45,000 barrels a day killing the GOM off.

If you want to delete this post for what I'm about to say, go for it.

F U BP! Liars!
I'm hoping PcolaDan - that after a few counties set the example, more will be able to step up with the same format.

Post 632 & 633 - Ugh & YIKES!!!

Twhcr - Costner's idea may work & it does not harm - we have to let the innovators have some space & opportunity, especially if the ideas will not hurt the environment... how can we learn & improve if we don't try.

Dinner's up
640. mobal
But it was on the internet! :)

Quoting JFLORIDA:
609

I dont think that is particularly possible - but the sea floor could have a fissure open - which is unlikely as this deposit is so deep under rock.

More of a danger is to workers in the area of the drilling by a buildup of gas on the surface and all the petroleum volatiles up there.
Foxx, just got home, had jury duty today and came very close to being called for a REAL criminal trial which has never happened. If it was BP I would have been praying let me be on this sucker. I have missed alot today I see. PDAN at least from what I've read the states/counties etc are in command now, screw the rest of the big government. I have alot of reading to do, saying hello, prayers from Houston.
640

I do like to see all possibilities too actually. Even weird theories usually have some essence of truth worthy of consideration.
644. code1
Great news reading on Okaloosa finally. Was wondering when we would step up to the plate. Seems I worried and fretted over nothing. The media is killing us talking of the oil slimed beaches, but standing on our sugar white sands. Grrrrrr They need to continue showing the tragedy in LA's wetlands, until/if it hits our shores. Hoping our local government can do more! Love the idea of social disobedience, but I'm an old hippy! LOL
Be home this weekend for a good while Foxx. Yayyyy Call you on my way home.
This speech is focusing on longer term. The independent fund is important.
And the War on Oil begins seriously.
This one I liked.
You've all known this already of course.

But I wanted to post it anyway.


649. mobal
A few thoughts on the presidents oval office speach....I took alot of notes but will only hit on a few....

1. Not much about stopping it!

2. 5,500,000 miles of boom.....wrong!(maybe I heard this wrong?)

3. Govt. to take over payouts....This will be interesting. Regardless of who does it I see corruption.

4. Rita and Katrina, Ivan?

5. China has clean energy tech.....
Not in use there, maybe Harbor Freight....

I would like to see this but at a cost to producers, not me

Just quik thoughts here....
Quoting mobal:
A few thoughts on the presidents oval office speach....I took alot of notes but will only hit on a few....

1. Not much about stopping it!

2. 5,500,000 miles of boom.....wrong!(maybe I heard this wrong?)

3. Govt. to take over payouts....This will be interesting. Regardless of who does it I see corruption.

4. Rita and Katrina, Ivan?

5. China has clean energy tech.....
Not in use there, maybe Harbor Freight....

I would like to see this but at a cost to producers, not me

Just quik thoughts here....


1. Don't think there was really much he could say. Mentioned the 90% captured by end of July then the other wells to stop it. (How are they going to capture the 90%? The new cap?)

2. Missed that one, but maybe it was, or was supposed to be 5,5000,000 feet? Miles, no way.

3. At least there SHOULD be some transparency, accountability and oversite, but then again, it is gov. With BP, we definitely got none of the above.

4. Yea, kind of ticked me off when he only mentioned those two.

5. Actually China is attempting to become the world leader in green technology, hoping I'm sure to cash in on it. They are horrible about implementing these things themselves though.
And how can you dis Harbor Freight? Where else can you get cheap one time use throw away tools? ;>) And occasionally they do have some gems.
WHAT Exactly IS HE SUPPOSED TO DO THE "STOP IT."
He said independent party and a established fund - which was a good idea.


His comments on china are entirely correct.
If nothing else boom and responsibility for shoreline protection is best organized on the community level. That is what is working in this disaster and as the situation is highly variable up and down the coast giving communities that authority is looking like the correct course.
Quoting JFLORIDA:
He said independent party and a established fund - which was a good idea.




You're right he did say this. I forgot. In theory this is the correct scenario, but in reality, is this even possible any more? Maybe get a fisherman (woman) from various affected cities along the coast and have them pick a leader from amongst themselves. Then they hire the people to run it.
I dont know how much oversight this needs - BP is paying out pretty good - abet too slowly for some.

Much of it is about to go to clean up and things like rental properties and tourism venues. It will get very complicated. More so as time goes on.
Any time you have this much money involved you need some sort of oversight. And to hear it on the news locally, payouts are not only slow like you said, but inadequate. One of the owners on the beach here said he is down 36K and only got 5k. And based on what I have seen on the beach, I believe it. The crowds are not here, neither local nor tourists.
That being said, people being people, some sort of oversight/auditing needs to be done to try and prevent fraud and some good old bot politics/friendships, while ensuring people get just compensation for lost livelihoods.
36 k !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Jheez.

Must be a hotel.
Quoting JFLORIDA:
36 k !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Jheez.

Must be a hotel.


I believe it may have been the owner of the pier, but I'm not 100% sure on that. I'm not a businessman so I don't know if he was exaggerating or not. I do know that unlike so many businesses that rely on Christmas to make their profits, those on the beach rely on the summer traffic to stay afloat.
Tonight... there's more evidence an underwater plume may have already crept into our inland waters...... A phenomenon that may be happening in Pensacola Bay.

cont ...
yea id wager its there.
Funny thing is, I had actually been mulling this over and had pretty much come to the same conclusion. It seems we go all day with nothing really happening, but wake up in the morning to find a new area hit with oil. And it didn't coincide with the tides, which have been around mid day. Which left either cooling during the night, lake of visible sun rays, or the moon. And it really had to be under water since boaters go in and out of the pass every day all day long, and you would think someone would have seen it.
Hi all,
I had to release some pressure before I came back into the blog or else my head was gonna blow after the POTUS speech. Frankly, I was disappointed, it seemed as though he was using this as an opportunity to push his energy bill through. I agree we need to wean ourselves from our dependency on oil, but that is not the immediate issue - the oil in the GOM is the primary concern for everyone along the Gulf Coast. Right now, the Energy Bill is not a priority - getting the oil spew stopped, protecting our shores & waterways; that's what we care about right now! Pointing fingers, blaming us, the American citizens for our dependency on oil in this crisis seems kind of like "crying over spilled milk". We have a crisis NOW - let's deal with it NOW... we all know we have to find alternatives, but that is not the immediate issue. We need to deal with the crisis first, then we can concern ourselves with weaning ourselves from our oil dependency.

Yes, Americans are dependent on oil, but so is every modernized nation on this planet. Don't blame us - blame BP, it was their negligence that brought on this disaster. We may be dependent on oil - but I'd like everyone to think it through... its a dependency we inherited from the generations before us. We are finally conscious of the fact that we have a bad habit & that we need to find a way to curtail that habit. But please, DO NOT BLAME the American people for this disaster, blame BP, we need oil, but we also need corporations that operate with concern for the safety of their employees & our environment, we need those same corporations to make profits so we can continue to grow & explore new energy sources.

Whew - that felt good! : )


At least he si establishing the fund. I dont think realistically the feds will ever to do the local stuff as good as the well, locals. They should at least streamline and ensure funding.

I think that is the logic there.

Also total reorganization of the MMS and giving scientists access which he addressed.
Believe me if he doesn't push the alternate energy now in a few years you will see oil wells off every coastline after peak. We are that close to oil supply disaster.
Hey JFL,

the fund is probably a good thing, but frankly I'm not sure I want the Fed. Gov. to be responsible for the Claim process. BP seems to be paying now & we all know what happens when the Feds, get involved! LOL All we need is more corruption... hahaha

Mostly, I've heard positive things from those who have filed claims. If they had the proper paperwork, proof of lost income, ie: tax returns, copies of cancellations, etc... they are getting paid. I know of more than one person who is getting auto deposits into their bank accounts. So, the payments are beginning to flow, some slower than others, but the systems BP has in place seem to be working. They probably need more claim offices & manpower, but as we all know, this is an unprecedented situation & its a learning curve for everyone.
I'm not in opposition of the Energy Bill, however, I do oppose using this disaster to scare already scared people into supporting the Bill. It was a political calculation, blatantly using the current situation to his advantage...
Deal with the current crisis - that is PRIORITY ONE.
Also, the dispersents - Stop spraying them into the GOM. Pouring more toxins into the Gulf is not a solution.
Quoting JFLORIDA:
Believe me if he doesn't push the alternate energy now in a few years you will see oil wells off every coastline after peak. We are that close to oil supply disaster.
I dont know so much has been done by the oil companies that I think we need to be scared - like BP now but running its bull 24/7 for 20 years. The situation is rather grave with peak oil and will lead to incredible disasters if it is not addressed now.

Also it is critically important that the MMS is reorganized.

I want to see this incredible mess actually be good for something constructive.
I think he is going to keep the feds out of the fund - least I hope so.
I keep reading disturbing stories about BP's financial health. I think they run these companies dangerously close to failure to milk out every dime of profit.

I think that is what happened to all the mega banks two years ago.
We are terrified. The Gulf is threatened, our entire gulf coast eco-system is threatened, my home, my livelihood, my future all in grave danger as a result of this oil spill. Gulf Coast residents are scared & rightfully so. I'm not patting the big oil companies on the back, but we need them. We need the rigs opened back up, those people put back to work, NOW. Closing those rigs is only making a bad situation worse.
Until we find a viable solution, a reasonable, effective alternative to our need for oil - we need the oil companies, just like a junkie needs his dealer. We cannot destroy the "big oil companies" with out destroying the American way of life. We have to wean ourselves off of our dependency of oil - otherwise our entire economy will fail.
Quoting JFLORIDA:
I dont know so much has been done by the oil companies that I think we need to be scared - like BP now but running its bull 24/7 for 20 years. The situation is rather grave with peak oil and will lead to incredible disasters if it is not addressed now.

Also it is critically important that the MMS is reorganized.

I want to see this incredible mess actually be good for something constructive.
Beach: It really is a bad situation and I 110% agree with your opinions.

Surprised to see you here so late!
Conchy,

It is bad, and I'm tired of the "blame" game. We are in a crisis & we need competent leadership focusing on the situation; not calculating the next political move. Deal with the immediate crisis - NOW.

Yep, I am up late! LOL And you are in a new time zone! Past my bedtime! Take care Nevada Rose! : ) Night.blockquote class='blogquote'>Quoting conchygirl:
Beach: It really is a bad situation and I 110% agree with your opinions.

Surprised to see you here so late!
674. code1
As bad as coal is, and you and I know both the horror and honor of such, it's a better alternative, and much more readily than the less than 2% oil supposedly in the Gulf. I've seen the rape of the mountains, it fed me for years, and I grieve it. Strip mining is horrible, but underground has a far better safety record, whether oil or coal. It's a no win situation for our citizens who make their living, and take their lives in hand either way. Sad, and I am off for a big poodle walk, and prayer before bed.
I disagree, when accounting for the pollution and soot from coal---and mercury and arsenic being released into the environment when coal is burned.

On another note, Obama's speech was flatter than a flounder. Which may be appropriate. He would have been better off not giving that speech.

The sad truth though, is that no one has the expertise or experience to solve this problem. It's not the federal government's job to manage oil spills---there's no expertise there. The military doesn't concern itself with oil spills. The Coast Guard does, but has no experience with anything on this scale. And it is obvious that BP had no plan on how to deal with a deep ocean oil spill. And I doubt that the other oil companies do either.

Obama would have done better to give more details on how the impacts of the oil spill will be dealt with. We sprang into action after 9/11, and made financial traders whole--the same should be done for the fishermen, hotels and restaurants that are losing their summer season at a minimum, and for years, in the case of fishermen.

Or perhaps a better way

Announce hiring 100,000 people to clean up beaches, find and clean birds, turtles, dolphins, and other sea life. House the workers in the half empty hotels and keep the hotels afloat with the per diem rates. Let the workers spend their wages in the local restaurants and bars. Keep the businesses afloat. And maybe do enough cleaning to keep things from being as bad as they could be.
Link Oil estimate raised to 35,000-60,000 barrels a day
morning friends - not much to say............
Good Morning,

Quoting JFLORIDA:
Believe me if he doesn't push the alternate energy now in a few years you will see oil wells off every coastline after peak. We are that close to oil supply disaster.


The world has plenty of oil, at a cost... the Tar Sands Reserve in Canada is greater then the known world oil reserve... the US gets lots of oil from Canada right now!!!!

Out in Co and Wy, the US government owns huge tracts of land ( Picket Act to establish a Naval Oil Reserve program ) containing oil shale reserves that are 4 or 5 times greater than the oil reserves in Saudi Arabia. Again ,cost and technology are problems.

We don't need to be drilling in deep water.
679. mobal
I stand corrected

Quoting JFLORIDA:
He said independent party and a established fund - which was a good idea.


675. SSI,

Very well said! Thank you....

678. Miss Nadia,

I agree, we do not need to be drilling deep, not until technology changes. We do have oil & there's a lot of it in the ANWR Alaska some estimates have said there's Trillions Barrels of in the region.

G'Morning Code -

SurfMom - as I look out over the water this morning, its hard for me to believe that oil is seeping, creeping this way. : (
From FL State Senator Don Gaetz office:

June 15, 2010

Latest Oil Spill Developments

The following is a summary of state and BP response actions to date, as well as tips for residents and visitors to take precautions both pre and post-landfall.

Landfall Reports and Predictions:

· On June 14, dime to five inch-sized tar balls and tar patties were found in widely scattered areas of Northwest Florida.

· Perdido Pass and Pensacola Pass will be closed with the tide to prevent oil from entering inland waters. Boom will be deployed across each Pass at flood tide (water coming in) and removed at ebb tide (water going out).

▪ Boaters in areas where skimming is being conducted, or where boom has been set, have been requested to maintain no-wake speeds.

▪ Based on oil activity recently, the United States Coast Guard's Captain of the Port for Sector Mobile authorized the official closure of Perdido Pass and Pensacola Pass. These waterways will be manned to allow access to necessary vessel traffic. Perdido Pass and Pensacola Pass will be open for vessel traffic during low tide. See NOAA tide predictions .

▪ Boat traffic needing access in or out of boom locations, should call 1-850-736-2261.

▪ A flashing light has been attached to all boom to increase visibility to boaters.

▪ According to NOAA projections, additional impacts are expected throughout northwest Florida within the next 72 hours due to onshore winds.

▪ The majority of impacts to Florida’s shoreline will likely be highly weathered, in the form of tar balls, oil sheen, tar mats or mousse – a pudding-like oil/water mixture that could be brown, rust or orange in color.

▪ Observations by NOAA continue to indicate no significant amounts of oil moving toward the Loop Current. The Loop Current Ring, a circular current which was formerly part of the Loop Current and contains a small portion of oil slick in the form of light sheens, has detached again from the main Loop Current.

▪ There have been no reports of Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill-related oil products reaching the shore beyond the northwest Florida region. There is no indication that the rest of the state will have impacts from weathered oil products within the next 72 hours.

▪ Learn more at the NOAA website . If oil is sighted on Florida’s coastline report it to the State Warning Point at 1-877-2-SAVE-FL (1-877-272-8335) or by dialing #DEP from most cell phones.



On Site Actions:

▪ Current projections estimate Deepwater Horizon’s discharge at 12,600 to 40,000 barrels per day. Learn more .

▪ BP has placed a Lower Marine Riser Package (LMRP) Cap Containment System in an attempt to contain the leak and capture a substantial amount of the leaking oil. On June 14, 15,420 barrels of oil were captured from the LMRP Cap Containment System. BP is continuing efforts to drill two relief wells.

State Actions:

▪ The State Emergency Operations Center is activated at Level 1.

· On June 13, the FWC issued an executive order to temporarily close a portion of coastal state waters offshore of Escambia County to the harvest of saltwater fish, crabs and shrimp.

▪ The closure includes state waters from the beaches out nine nautical miles into the Gulf from the Alabama line east to the Pensacola Beach water tower. Interior bays and estuaries remain open to fishing.

▪ This area covers approximately 23 miles of Florida’s coastline in Escambia County, where oil spill is now present.

▪ Recreational catch-and-release fishing is still allowed as long as saltwater fish are not harvested or possessed in the closed area. Oysters, clams and mussels are not included in the closure, because they are not expected to be affected by oil in the area. Learn more .

▪ On June 10, DEP issued an Amended Emergency Final Order to accelerate preparedness and restoration in the counties under the Governor’s state-of-emergency Executive Orders.

▪ On June 10, Deepwater Horizon Unified Command announced the activation of the Florida Peninsula Command Post in Miami. Learn more .

▪ On June 9, FWC announced that its commissioners will hold an informal meeting in Pensacola Beach on June 15, to hear from people with fish and wildlife concerns related to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Learn more .

▪ Governor Crist has issued three Executive Orders since April 30, 2010 declaring a state of emergency in 26 coastal counties that may see impacts.

▪ DEP conducted water and sediment sampling to use as a baseline and is monitoring air quality data. Statewide air quality monitoring is conducted in coordination with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Learn more at http://www.airnow.gov/ or http://www.epa.gov/bpspill/.

Air quality reports for June 14 revealed that air quality was considered good for ozone and moderate for fine particulate matter in northwest Florida. “Good” means the air quality is satisfactory and air pollution poses little or no risk. “Moderate” means air quality is acceptable for most people.

Boom Placement:
▪ Approximately 305,900 feet of boom has been placed in northwest Florida along the most sensitive areas and 58,750 feet is staged. Additionally, counties in the region are moving forward with supplemental booming plans. As of June 14, 250,010 feet of supplemental boom has been deployed or staged by Florida contractors.

▪ Placement of boom is based on where the oil is threatening, as well as each region’s area contingency plan.


Health Effects:

▪ The Florida Department of Health, in coordination with DEP and VISITFLORIDA has developed an online mapping resource that contains the most up-to-date health advisory information for Florida's beach waters. Visitors are encouraged to visit www.dep.state.fl.us/deepwaterhorizon/health.htm or www.visitflorida.com/florida_travel_advisory/.

▪ On June 8, Escambia County Health Department, in coordination with Escambia County Emergency Management and local officials posted a health advisory for the area extending from the Florida-Alabama state line to the entrance of the Perdido Unit, Gulf Islands National Seashore. Learn more .

▪ If residents or visitors see tar or oiled debris on the beach, DO NOT PICK IT UP. Report it to the Florida State Warning Point by calling #DEP from a cell phone or 1-877-2-SAVE-FL (1-877-272-8335). For most people, an occasional brief contact with a small amount of oil will do no harm, yet still it is not recommended. Learn more .

▪ For general health information questions regarding the oil-spill and exposure to oil spill products contact the Florida Poison Information Centers at 1-800-222-1222.

▪ DOH has compiled guidelines for managing stress and preventing heat related injuries for those impacted by the oil spill or involved in cleanup activities. Learn more.
Fisheries & Seafood:

▪ On June 8, NOAA adjusted the boundaries of the previously closed fishing area, opening 339 square miles off of northwest Florida, with the northern boundary now ending at the Florida federal-state water line on the east side of Choctawhatchee Bay. Learn more .

▪ While state waters off the coast of Escambia County are closed for the harvest of saltwater fish, crabs and shrimp, all other state waters remain open to recreational fishing.

▪ Fishermen who wish to contact BP about a claim should call 1-800-440-0858.

▪ To report oiled wildlife, please call 1-866-557-1401 and leave a message. Messages are checked hourly.

▪ For the safety of the public as well as the safety of animals, rescues should only be conducted by trained responders. Learn more .


Tourism:

▪ Through www.VISITFLORIDA.com, vacationers are able to view live Twitter feeds and read up-to-the-minute information on the status of any city or region in Florida. Learn more at http://www.visitflorida.com/florida_travel_advisory/.

▪ The Florida State Parks website, http://www.floridastateparks.org, is updated daily and will list any impacts. Learn more by calling 1-850-245-2157.

Tips for Homeowners:

▪ While the state appreciates the concern expressed by Floridians and the ingenuity of those seeking alternative measures to help protect the state’s shoreline, the following tips are offered to ensure that these measures are helpful and not harmful to Florida’s coasts, wildlife and water resources: Tips for homeowners.


Tips for Businesses and Consumers:

▪ The Attorney General’s fraud hotline is open to receive any reports of fraud or price gouging. The hotline is 1-866-966-7226.

▪ The Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services Commissioner gas price-gouging hotline is also operational. The toll-free hotline number is 1-800-HELP-FLA (1-800-435-7352).

▪ Coastal businesses should make loss of earnings claims for damages incurred as a result of the oil spill. Learn more at http://www.myfloridacfo.com/ or by calling 1-850-413-3089 or toll-free at 1-877-MY-FL-CFO (1-877-693-5236).

▪ To discuss spill related damage with BP representatives, please call the BP Claims Reporting Line at 1-800-440-0858.

Volunteer Opportunities:

▪ Individuals interested in volunteering can register at www.volunteerfloridadisaster.org.

▪ Volunteers will not be in direct contact with oil or oil-contaminated materials.

▪ The Governor’s Commission on Volunteerism and Community Service – Volunteer Florida is encouraging Floridians and visitors to stay current on the latest information on scheduled beach cleanups and other local volunteer opportunities. Learn more .

▪ Individuals who live along or who are visiting coastal communities are encouraged to enjoy Florida’s coastal areas while watching for oiled wildlife and shoreline. Report impacts by calling 1-866-557-1401 and report oiled shoreline in Florida by calling #DEP from a cell phone or 1-877-2-SAVE-FL (1-877-272-8335).

Learn More About Florida’s Response:

▪ DEP launched a Twitter account, www.Twitter.com/FLDEPalert, dedicated to providing updates on Florida’s response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.

▪ DEP in coordination with the state Emergency Operations Center established an email sign-up and a comprehensive website at http://www.deepwaterhorizonflorida.com.

▪ For a list of Unified Command, BP and Florida phone numbers, visit http://www.dep.state.fl.us/deepwaterhorizon/default.htm#numbers.

▪ The Oil Spill Information Line is available at 1-888-337-3569 from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. seven days a week. Additional phone numbers have also been established for persons with disabilities: (800) 955-8771 (TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (voice).

LINKS BEYOND: As Destin and Okaloosa buck unified command, the nation takes notice

There are some excellent links included in this article.
Checking in after 4 days on the beach at Ft. Morgan.
The Ft. Morgan property has about a mile of public beach. This beach was closed to the public, so I don't know what kind of shape it was in.
There was plenty of tar balls on the beach. During the 4 days, I didn't see any clean-up crews. There were plenty of beach goers that were willing to help clean the beach, but the public is not allowed to do so. There was no local waste dump supplied to dispose of the oil. As explained by a Coast Guard guy, this was to discourage the public from attempting any clean-up. There was a dump about 5 miles from where we stayed, but it was not identified as a hazardous dump. Again, to discourage the public.
IMO I think the government wants to use the clean-up as an excuse to say look what I did for you.
The tar balls were suspended in the water column. They could be seen along the bottom if you waded out into the water. It was odd how the tar balls were left on the beach. As the tide went out, the tar balls were left on the beach. As the tide came in the tar balls were picked back up and re-suspended. At high tide there was no tar balls. I have no idea how that worked, but I could see that it would create a nightmare trying to clean it up. The clean-up would have to be scheduled around the tide. I can't imagine a graveyard clean-up crew.
This comment is getting long so I will cut off for now.
Jesse
Hello

I have a question.... What is the limit of US jurisdiction in the Gulf...3 miles?...12 Miles.... or what? How do we have jurisdiction over the Explorer when it's 25 miles at sea and registered in a foreign country?
Jesse,

Thank you! Tarballs & tarmats, oil in the water column - we all know its there.

The clean up seems to be very disorganized - a lot of confusion & no one in a leadership position...

I hope that you had a good vacation, even with the negativity of the situation at hand. : )

Thanks for the update - a first hand, eyes on the scene update is worth much more than a media spun news story!
I think Federal waters start at 9 miles out.....
Quoting MissNadia:
Hello

I have a question.... What is the limit of US jurisdiction in the Gulf...3 miles?...12 Miles.... or what? How do we have jurisdiction over the Explorer when it's 25 miles at sea and registered in a foreign country?
684.

Jesse, did you get photos???
Beach
I was very discouraged after I saw what was going on. I spent most of my time in the shade or in the condo watching the disorganized skimming process.
More later, I've got outside work to do.
Jesse
688. Beach
Yes, I did get a couple of photos, but they were about the same as PcolaDan posted. Nothing special.
Jesse
Thanks Jesse,

Gotta run - have a great day!

YOLO
Thanks BIG TheoJesse - like Foxxy said - I really appreciate the first hand reports.

Still no word from DiveSon : (
Post 683 -re Okaloosa Bucking the System

"The lesson of that history is that you must not despair, that if you are right, and you persist, things will change. The government will try to deceive the people, and the newspapers and television may do the same, but the truth has a way of coming out. The truth has a power greater than a hundred lies. My hope is that you will not be content to be successful in the way our society measures success; that you will not obey the rules, when the rules are unjust; that you will act out the courage that I know is in you." Howard Zinn - Address to Spelman College, 2005
Quoting MissNadia:
Hello

I have a question.... What is the limit of US jurisdiction in the Gulf...3 miles?...12 Miles.... or what? How do we have jurisdiction over the Explorer when it's 25 miles at sea and registered in a foreign country?


Under the United Nations Convention on Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), the exclusive economic zone or EEZ is covered by Articles 56, 58 and 59. The EEZ is defined as that portion of the seas and oceans extending up to 200 nautical miles in which coastal States have the right to explore and exploit natural resources as well as to exercise jurisdiction over marine science research and environmental protection. Freedom of navigation and over flight, laying of submarine cables and pipelines, as well as other uses consented on the high seas, are still allowed.

Quoting MissNadia:
Good Morning,



The world has plenty of oil, at a cost... the Tar Sands Reserve in Canada is greater then the known world oil reserve... the US gets lots of oil from Canada right now!!!!

Out in Co and Wy, the US government owns huge tracts of land ( Picket Act to establish a Naval Oil Reserve program ) containing oil shale reserves that are 4 or 5 times greater than the oil reserves in Saudi Arabia. Again ,cost and technology are problems.

We don't need to be drilling in deep water.


Those reserves are included in peak estimates - we simply use it too fast. The resulting pricing pressure will cause a new push for exploration and drilling if strong de-incentive is not in place.

Panama city is next, and the spill is too large to effectively keep out - IMHO. But I guess we will see.

From Dr M's Blog:



Note the oil inclusion activity near estuaries.
"There will be other cartels and other shortages. American wisdom and courage right now can set a path to follow in the future." - Jimmy Carter televised speech 1979



Not regarding a reasonable long term straggly put us right back in the same position.
Quoting code1:
As bad as coal is, and you and I know both the horror and honor of such, it's a better alternative, and much more readily than the less than 2% oil supposedly in the Gulf. I've seen the rape of the mountains, it fed me for years, and I grieve it. Strip mining is horrible, but underground has a far better safety record, whether oil or coal. It's a no win situation for our citizens who make their living, and take their lives in hand either way. Sad, and I am off for a big poodle walk, and prayer before bed.


oh man i went to west va and saw the mountains that were turned into just horrible industrial looking piles. its a terrible thing. even sand mining is terrible. we have sand mining in nw fla and people need sand to build but geez, it has to be done in some way that doesnt ruin an area for fifty years.
when i grew up the tourist season on the gulf was easter to labor day. but now we have snow birds that come all winter. the beach had slow periods but basically tourism is year round now. water use records show peak season for nw fla is July 4. for south fla it is october 1. (thats official). this year july 4 is a bust already.
conservatives despise and ridicule jimmy carter. but he will go down in history as one of the greatest humanitarians and statemen of our era.
i think we need to take over iraqs oil. just sayin.
"We've got to stop crying and start sweating, stop talking and start walking, stop cursing and start praying. The strength we need will not come from the White House, but from every house in America."


Carter's 79 speech was prophetic.
Quoting twhcracker:
conservatives despise and ridicule jimmy carter. but he will go down in history as one of the greatest humanitarians and statemen of our era.


Reagan CUT A DEAL with the Iranians sold Iran and Iraq arms and laid the philosophical groundwork for al qaeda. EVERY problem we have was somehow exasperated by Reagan.

His failure to renew tax incentives let to the failure of 95 percent of American solar businesses.
Quoting twhcracker:


oh man i went to west va and saw the mountains that were turned into just horrible industrial looking piles. its a terrible thing. even sand mining is terrible. we have sand mining in nw fla and people need sand to build but geez, it has to be done in some way that doesnt ruin an area for fifty years.

In to cool off.
In Alabama around Birmingham and Jasper there are many strip mines. These were for coal and iron ore.
Someone finally got smart enough to get it mandated that these mines be returned to the original conditions after the mines are depleted.
I met Drummund, the guy who started Drummund Coal, many years ago. He showed me one of his operations. He explained the mandated requirements, and said that a discovery was carefully examined to determine if it was profitable after having to restore the area. If it was not profitable, the project was abandoned. It's too bad this mandate was not started much earlier.
Jesse
“"We are at a turning point in our history. There are two paths to choose. One is a path I've warned about tonight, the path that leads to fragmentation and self-interest. Down that road lies a mistaken idea of freedom, the right to grasp for ourselves some advantage over others. That path would be one of constant conflict between narrow interests ending in chaos and immobility. It is a certain route to failure.

All the traditions of our past, all the lessons of our heritage, all the promises of our future point to another path, the path of common purpose and the restoration of American values. That path leads to true freedom for our nation and ourselves. We can take the first steps down that path as we begin to solve our energy problem.

Energy will be the immediate test of our ability to unite this nation, and it can also be the standard around which we rally. On the battlefield of energy we can win for our nation a new confidence, and we can seize control again of our common destiny."

Carter - 79 - before we wasted nearly HALF A CENTURY.
705. JFLORIDA
Carter had some good profound ideas. It's sad that those ideas were mostly ignored while everyone was watching Billy make a fool of himself.
Jesse
The Press was a disaster back then too. Not really focusing on the real issues.
JF we new what would happen in the 70's.People forgot.They went back to using fuel like it would last forever.If we don't learn from this disaster then we deserve whatever happens!You only get so many chances.I hope it's not to late already!
Read 705

He was exactly on. People that claim to be avoiding politics here and are just pushing the the opposite agenda. We settled all this before.

Denial sank us.
#705 He was correct!We never seem to learn!
someone just told me the oil is supposed to be in destin by midnite tonite and panama city beach by tomorrow. anyone know anything about that??
Tarballs are on Okaloosa Island. It's sad. I'll post more when I get home.
Just left Ok Is in FWB. The are tar globs all along the beach. The arrived just before noon. It's awful to see.
Quoting twhcracker:
someone just told me the oil is supposed to be in destin by midnite tonite and panama city beach by tomorrow. anyone know anything about that??
Quoting Beachfoxx:
Tarballs are on Okaloosa Island. It's sad. I'll post more when I get home.

:* ((

T-storm rolling in - off for a bit
3 P.M. UPDATE: No swimming, says health dept. (PHOTOS)

3 p.m. - After a new wave of larger tar balls hit Okaloosa Island Wednesday, the county health department advised people to stay out of the water, according to a press release.

People are urged to avoid all contact with the water on Okaloosa Island from Eglin property to the eastern boundary of Beasley Park, the Okaloosa County Health Department release reads. "No wading, swimming, or entering the water."

View a gallery of photos of tar balls on the beach. »

View a gallery of photos of tarball clusters seen from the Okaloosa pier.»

People are urged to avoid contact with tar and dead or dying fish. People seeing animals in need of rescue are asked to call 311, option 0.

People are also asked to not fish in oiled waters and avoid harvesting fish that have oily residue or a petroleum odor. People also should not boat through patches oil sheen and tar balls.

County emergency management would make the call to shut down the beach, but has not done so. Tar balls continued to wash ashore through the afternoon. A 50-man cleanup of crew of BP PLC contractors was on scene.

Okaloosa County Emergency Management Coordinater Ken Wolfe asked people to stay out of the way of the cleanup crew and watch their step while walking along the high-tide line.

Wolfe said some of the tar balls on the beach are the size of coffee cups, and "very few, but a few" were the size of dinner plates.

The county has received some reports of people putting tar balls in beach trash cans, and people are asked to stop doing this. Doing so means entire trash cans have to be handled as hazardous materials.

Quoting Beachfoxx:
Oil spill effects: 20 links guaranteed to make you think (with video)

What a shame.
Yes, it is. Sad -


IKE It was awful - you could see a mass of the oil from the beach & those gobs of oil, tarballs on the shore. I did not have a camera with me... and I always carry a camera! So the pics from the Iphone were all I took.
I could also smell a kerosene smell.
58 days - and its here. More to come.
Quoting BabbsHarry:

What a shame.
723. IKE
Here's some pictures at Okaloosa Island...now Oil Island....thanks BP!

Link
724. IKE
Beaches and way of life ruined.
It's bad, Ike. It was so sad to see...

Gotta walk to lil' dogs. BBL
Quoting IKE:
Beaches and way of life ruined.
The Marine life - this is all so heartbreaking.

Sea creatures flee oil spill, gather near shore
Quoting Beachfoxx:
The Marine life - this is all so heartbreaking.

Sea creatures flee oil spill, gather near shore


It is heart-breaking and may explain the scarcity of birds I've noticed. Yesterday, I din't see any plovers or sandpipers, just one turnstone. The number of black skimmers increased by four.
I am beginning to wonder if a State can die and what happens it it does. I know California wondered with the economic crisis they faced.

Florida has a unique economy, as all states do, I guess. Not well diversified. Tourisum being #1. If we lose our beaches and fishing, coupled with the loss of the Space Industry...I just wonder what we will become.

As a Florida Native, I am concerned and sad. I want to be part of the soultion, I am just not seeing what that is.

Waiting for the oily shoe is painful.
I heard that Okaloosa County is planning on doing their own clean up/prevention. They are tired of waiting for the Feds and BP to wade thru redtape That's great, that's the American way - don't sit around waiting for the Feds or for BP to do it. They will worry about the legality of it later.

Yes, our beaches are the best but I'm hoping that the Disney/golf tourists still come and spend money. It won't be enough but it's better than losing it all. Lots of folks own houses here and come here for stuff other than the beach, hope they keep on coming.
There's some danged funny stuff going on with the cleanup. Some Texas captains that went to LA to drive vessels of opportunity are back home, mad as can be. They went to help, but discovered they were being given jobs while many Louisiana captains were being passed over.

On the other hand, Louisiana captains who put their vessels in the program are being sent to other states. It makes no sense. Local captains know local waters - they know the tides, the shallows, the general movement of the water. You'd want them in the areas they know best, not sent to another state.

Unless.... you wanted to pull them out of their communities as well, making it more difficult to tell people about what they are experiencing as they work.

From Bayou Woman's blog:

Captain 1 also discovered that he was about the only vessel operator hired to run a boat in his own home territory. He claimed that BP is hiring boats and their crews and sending them to other state coastlines to work rather than letting them work in the waters they know blindfolded. He was disturbed to see boat trailer license plates in the parking lot from many other states and only a few from Louisiana.

Why? Because BP doesn’t want these fishermen to know what is going on or NOT going on in their own back yards. This has been confirmed.


And this:

Captain 3, a charter captain who owns an airboat in Plaquemines Parish, has worked over a month straight in a different parish. He was required to sleep on a barge, not allowed to EVER leave the site, except for the two nights they let him go home in over a month. If he sees oiled wildlife, especially brown pelicans, he is to record the GPS coordinates, and report those coordinates to an official number. He is gravely concerned, because after making several such reports over that first month, he never saw anyone picking up the birds.

What gives? BP demands we do what they require, yet they don’t do what they say they will.


Obama and the BP execs can make nicey-nice for the cameras, but some of the reports from the Louisiana coast tell a quite different story.

Yes Wanda,
I posted a link about it yesterday - I'm glad that our County is taking action regardless of what the Feds or BP says! At least someone is being Pro-active...
Why wait for help, when you can help yourself???

In response to your question about the smell:

Oneshot - you know, I was so stunned at the amount of goo on the beach I don't remember the smell.
However, I can smell a kerosene smell in the air, both in Destin & Niceville - probably from the burn-off.
Quoting oneshotww:
I heard that Okaloosa County is planning on doing their own clean up/prevention. They are tired of waiting for the Feds and BP to wade thru redtape That's great, that's the American way - don't sit around waiting for the Feds or for BP to do it. They will worry about the legality of it later.

Yes, our beaches are the best but I'm hoping that the Disney/golf tourists still come and spend money. It won't be enough but it's better than losing it all. Lots of folks own houses here and come here for stuff other than the beach, hope they keep on coming.
Good evening everyone. As a long time lurker, first time posting on this blog, I'd like to thank everyone for all the the information posted here.

Ms.Beachfoxx, you are one high-class lady. I had to post today, to tell you how truly saddened I am to see the oil has arrived on your precious sands. We knew this day was coming.

I do have a question for you- when you went to your shoreline today were you able to see any smoke or fire on the horizon?
O'Reilly,

Welcome to the blog & thank you for you kinds words

No, I could not, but we had thunderstorms & low clouds. I could however, smell a kerosene in the air. Its about the 4th time that I've smelled it in the air. The first was around May 21st, give or take a day. I'd have to look at a calendar.

Thank you for the answer, Ms.Beachfoxx. Glancing at the PBS ticker, the realization of approx 73 million gallons, is incomprehensible. The flow rate seems to have doubled if not tripled, from looking at the video so many times.
735. mobal
Fox,

Maybe time for a diary?...

BTW, the workers we spoke of were given yesterday off....The visit?

Quoting Beachfoxx:
O'Reilly,

Welcome to the blog & thank you for you kinds words

No, I could not, but we had thunderstorms & low clouds. I could however, smell a kerosene in the air. Its about the 4th time that I've smelled it in the air. The first was around May 21st, give or take a day. I'd have to look at a calendar.

736. mobal
OReilly,

Welcome aboard!
Good evening, Mobal. From previous posts I will assume you are in or near Mobile, AL. The pictures and posts on this board from your area over the weekend seemed but a prelude to this week's events.
Without wanting to sound like a conspiracy theorist, I do feel as though the BOP is in danger of failure, much like a leaking faucet that completely blows off of plumbing.
What? For real? Mobal - that is wrong! Did you make any contact with anyone?
Quoting mobal:
Fox,

Maybe time for a diary?...

BTW, the workers we spoke of were given yesterday off....The visit?

I think we are all being feed a bunch of bs. If coastal residents don't get out there and do what they can, their beaches will suffer. We need to act, not wait for BP or the Feds. We all saw how fast the Feds got their act together after a hurricane... we never got a bag of ice until the 5th or 6th day AFTER the 'cane hit, nevermind what happened after Katrina.

Hey Wanda,

LOL - after Opal, it had to be at least a week before we got ice & it came from a local beer distributor. The water we got, yep, a local beer distributor, put water in cans and passed it out. I don't remember anyone asking for FEMA help. We just did it. The National Guard was here & the Red Cross, but honestly, I don't remember FEMA being a major contributor in the recovery. It was locals helping locals, neighbor, helping neighbor... and those good looking Tampa Power Company boys who showed up in a convoy & gave us back our electricity - 3, maybe 4 weeks after the storm.
Florida will do EVERYTHING it can to protect our shoreline & waterways... I just hope that no one stands in our way!
from BBC news

Oil giant BP is to put $20bn (£13.5bn) in a compensation fund for victims of the Gulf oil spill and will not pay shareholders a dividend this year.
BF, you know, I think we all knew it was going to hit your way eventually, but refused to really believe it. That just sucks.

I bet the crews working to protect the pass have some extra incentive to get the work done in a hurry. Unlike over here, where apparently we're going to wait for BP to take care of things.

12 days from Pensacola shores to Ft Walton. I constantly catch whiffs of foul air. I can only blame so much of it on my poor old Jeep.

We're in it for the long term I'm afraid.
Dan,

Right after the rig blew, I knew there was trouble... then when hubby & I went to that first BP Emergency meeting - the Florida DEP Secretary, Mike Sole spoke his words resonated through my head, "its not IF it hits your beaches, its WHEN."
WHEN arrived today, and it ain't pretty. : (
Quoting Beachfoxx:
Dan,

Right after the rig blew, I knew there was trouble... then when hubby & I went to that first BP Emergency meeting - the Florida DEP Secretary, Mike Sole spoke his words resonated through my head, "its not IF it hits your beaches, its WHEN."
WHEN arrived today, and it ain't pretty. : (


It's all surreal. You see it on the beach, but it can't be real; all the people on the beaches in long pants, boots, gloves; ATV's of all sort driving up and down the beach; more types of people in so many different uniforms in cars, trucks, ATV's boats; camera crews everywhere you go.
{{{{Foxx}}}} John and I are meeting our daughter and family on Orange Beach next Wednesday. They know they can't get in the water but have looked forward to this vacation for so long. (condo on the beach) I just hope the smell isn't too bad! :~(
Foxx - I have been following this horrific event for some time, it has been unbelievably painful. Our little neighborhood has had its first direct effect from the spill. A neighbor is leaving her home on the Gulf and moving back here. I do not know how well she and her daughter really get along but for many such families this rearrangement will have consequences that will never be added to the damage toll.
A random thought - isn't letting BP control the cleanup sort of like letting the fox guard the henhouse or letting Aloysius the 'nip head guard the catnip supply???
Stay strong, this is a truly an awful thing.
Beachfoxx~ I'm so sorry about what has happened to your beach.
Hello Small PEOPLE -Still cant
get over the arrogance..... so sad this nightmare is continuing. God help us all. Good night.
"BP has not said how much oil is beneath the Gulf seabed Deepwater Horizon was tapping, but a company official speaking on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the volume of reserves, confirmed reports that it was tens of millions of barrels – a frightening prospect to many." (Associated Press)
Good Morning All -
I have been lurking - glad for all of the useful information being collected here - thanks Beachfoxx!
In reference to post #730 - shoreacres -- driving in to work this morning from Fort Walton Beach to Santa Rosa Beach, I saw several 'work' type boats (3 or 4) turning into the Harbor area by the Boathouse -- all of them were from Port Arthur, TX.
Don't know if they are here via BP or if they have been brought in as specialist for some of the plans the local county comissioners are implementing.

Beachfoxx - you have WU mail
4 Ways BP and Officials Are Working to Suppress the Outrageous Facts About the Gulf Disaster |

From intimidating reporters to trying to enforce no-fly zones, there seems to be a concerted effort to block public access to information.
June 17, 2010 |
With BP's oil gusher in the gulf approaching two months, public anger is approaching the boiling point. When will the oil spilling into the gulf be stopped and what remediation can be done for the ecosystem and the local economy? Those of us who aren't at ground zero have to rely on what the media is reporting -- which is turning into an outrageous scandal of its own.

"Journalists struggling to document the impact of the oil rig explosion have repeatedly found themselves turned away from public areas affected by the spill, and not only by BP and its contractors, but by local law enforcement, the Coast Guard and government officials," wrote Jeremy W. Peters for the New York Times. "To some critics of the response effort by BP and the government, instances of news media being kept at bay are just another example of a broader problem of officials' filtering what images of the spill the public sees. Scientists, too, have complained about the trickle of information that has emerged from BP and government sources. Three weeks passed, for instance, from the time the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded on April 20 and the first images of oil gushing from an underwater pipe were released by BP."

So what's really going on? Is there is concerted effort to block information from reaching the public? Here are four examples that point to a widespread effort to suppress public access to information about an environmental disaster -- we may still not yet know exactly how bad this thing is, or how bad it's going to get.

1. Restricting Access

One of the most common complaints so far from journalists is that they are having problems getting the access they need to do their jobs -- like CBS, which reported its news team was threatened with arrest while attempting to get footage of an oil-soaked public beach. Weeks of similar complaints resulted in a memo issued by Doug Suttles, BP's chief operating officer, claiming that the company is not interfering with press access.

The memo states: "Recent media reports have suggested that individuals involved in the cleanup operation have been prohibited from speaking to the media, and this is simply untrue. BP fully supports and defends all individuals' rights to share their personal thoughts and experiences with journalists if they so choose."

But when WDSU news anchor Scott Walker tried to interview cleanup workers on a public beach on Grand Isle, LA, private security guards tried to prevent him. The news agency reports: "He told the guards he intended to ask contracted cleanup crews about their efforts while workers were on their breaks. The guards told Walker he could not question the workers and was not allowed on the public beach."

And Walker hasn't been alone. The New York Times reported a similar incident on Grand Isle by media from the New York Daily News. "The contractor summoned a local sheriff, who then told the reporter, Matthew Lysiak, that news media had to fill out paperwork and then be escorted by a BP official to get access to the beach," the article said. "'For the police to tell me I needed to sign paperwork with BP to go to a public beach?' Mr. Lysiak said. 'It's just irrational.'"

And it's not just Grand Isle; many journalists have been stymied trying to get in the air to get a glimpse of the scope and damage of the disaster. Flight restriction over the water have prevented many from doing so. "Each time they fly in the area, they have to be granted permission from the F.A.A.," reported the New York Times.

Can't get into the air or interview subjects on the beach -- how about taking a boat ride? Well, that's pretty tough, too. Reporting for Earth Island Journal, Jason Marks writes that at Grande Isle, "The beaches are no-go zones even for homeowners with beachfront property, and the press can hit the sand only by going through a complicated credentialing process. The Coast Guard is arranging media tours by boat, but the waiting list is close to a week long. Charter boats are either hard to find (most of the captains are working for BP), or else relatively expensive ($300 for an afternoon on the water)."

Clearly this is problematic, if you're trying to let the public know what's going on. As Peters concedes, "Media access in disaster situations is always an issue. But the situation in the gulf is especially nettlesome because journalists have to depend on the government and BP to gain access to so much of the affected area."

And if you're BP or the U.S government, there's a really good chance you don't want people to know just how bad things really are.

2. Hiding Evidence

"It looks as if someone is destroying evidence at the scene of the crime," Keith Olbermann reported days ago. Marine biologist Dr. Riki Ott told Olbermann of reports from wildlife volunteers who are walking the beaches that oiled wildlife keeps disappearing in the night. "In my opinion there is a strong attempt, not only to minimize how much oil was spilling, but now to control the evidence of the damage," Ott told Olbermann.

In a recent article, she explained:

In Orange Beach, people told me BP wouldn't let them collect carcasses. Instead, the company was raking up carcasses of oiled seabirds. "The heads separate from the bodies," one upset resident told me. "There's no way those birds are going to be autopsied. BP is destroying evidence!"


The body count of affected wildlife is crucial to prove the harm caused by the spill, and also serves as an invaluable tool to evaluate damages to public property -- the dolphins, sea turtles, whales, sea birds, fish, and more, that are owned by the American public. Disappeared body counts means disappeared damages -- and disappeared liability for BP. BP should not be collecting carcasses. The job should be given to NOAA, a federal agency, and volunteers, as was done during the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska.


A BP contractor, fed up with attempts by the company to cover up the effects of the spill and deny media access, decided to give journalists his own tour of Queen Bess barrier island. Think Progress reports:

"There is a lot of coverup for BP. They specifically informed us that they don't want these pictures of the dead animals. They know the ocean will wipe away most of the evidence. It's important to me that people know the truth about what's going on here," the contractor said.


"The things I've seen: They just aren't right. All the life out here is just full of oil. I'm going to show you what BP never showed the President." [...]


"BP is going to say the deaths of these animals wasn't oil-related," the contractor added. "We know the truth. I hope these pictures get to the right people -- to someone who can do something."


3. Withholding Information

Things have gotten so bad that the group OpenTheGovernment.org sent a letter to President Obama that was signed by the Society of Professional Journalists and dozens of other organizations expressing their concern over the public's ability to access data related to the Gulf disaster. "Access to all monitoring data is crucial for scientists and the public to understand the extent of the problem, and plan for how to help the area recover and thrive," they wrote.

And there is ample reason to be concerned. Here's what they expressed:

Based on a brief clip of BP's feed that has been made available, independent scientists have assessed that the spill may differ from estimates larger than BP and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have calculated. Access to all monitoring data is crucial for resolving these conflicting estimates and improving public trust.


Monitoring data, including how much oil is spilling out of the leak, the effects of the oil on the surrounding area, what is being done to stop the leak, and the results of tests on the extent of workers' exposure are matters of great national interest and concern to the public. The livelihoods of families that are reliant on the Gulf Coast's fishing and tourism industries -- and others -- are at risk. Further, it is too early to tell what the final cost of the disaster will be to public health. Given that the leak is within US Exclusive Economic Zone waters (and therefore within US territory) and operated according to a lease granted by the US government, the US public should have the right to access to the video feed, both past and current, as well as other information about the oil spill and its impact.


BP did not release video feed of the leak for a month and did so only after pressure from the public and the government. But as Timothy B. Hurst reports last week, they basically gave us crap to look at. "It turns out that those grainy videos that were so hard to get from BP in the first place are nowhere near the best they have," he explains. "That's right, there is high resolution video of the oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead and only now, 50 days after the initial explosion, are we learning that such video even exists."

This of course has direct implication in figuring out how much oil is leaking and is the reason why estimates of the damage keep going up the more we are actually able to learn.

4. Denying Responsibility

As infuriating as BP's stonewalling is, it's even more frustrating that they seem to be taking so little responsibility for it. Mother Jones reporter Mac McClelland posted a so-depressing-it's-comical story about the runaround from BP and local officials she has been getting trying to cover the story.

And News Hour's Spencer Michels said, "Trying to find out what was going on was sometimes impossible."

That may be because BP is hiding under the cover of their hired help. Many of the journalists trying to access Grand Isle have run into folks from Talon Security. When Yahoo news pressed BP about the incidents, BP's spokesman Mark Proegler said: "We are not trying to prevent media access in any area, but we've heard about some incidents and we've gone back and shared our stance on this with Talon" and then he added "we can't force our contractors to work with media if they choose not to."

Yes, that's right, BP just said it can't force the people it's hired to do their jobs properly. I guess that means it's up to us to demand that our government hold BP's feet to the fire to ensure that the media, scientists and the public have full access to information. It shouldn't be up to BP to decide how badly it has screwed up.

Tara Lohan is a senior editor at AlterNet. You can follow her on Twitter @TaraLohan.

I have to say...... the ideas presented here are very fascinating... VERY....and like Costner & Costeau's ideas -this will do no harm & If this concept, is safe & viable,I sure hope it gets to the right people for consideration...... as always if you like this -- pass it on.... one of the few tools "we the people" have - is the mighty mouse to the right of your keyboard.

Mycologist Paul Stamets studies the mycelium -- and lists 6 ways that this astonishing fungus can help save the world. this is well-worth the 18 minutes.



A 90-Year-Old Maritime Law Gets BP Off The Hook For Workers Killed On The Deepwater Rig. - By Stephanie Mencimer


News and commentary about environmental issues.
By Stephanie MencimerPosted Wednesday, June 16, 2010, at 1:43 PM ET
Read Slate's complete coverage of the BP oil spill.

Deepwater Horizon oil rig work siteAfter a BP refinery in Texas exploded in 2005, killing 15 workers and injuring scores more, the oil giant paid $1.6 billion in settlements to employees and their families. But the families of the workers killed on BP's Deepwater Horizon rig in the Gulf of Mexico probably won't receive a similar windfall. That's because the Deepwater rig is legally considered an oceangoing vessel and was more three nautical miles offshore at the time of the accident. As a result, the families of the dead workers can only sue BP and its contractors under a 90-year-old maritime law, the Death on the High Seas Act, which severely limits liability. In some cases, BP could get away with shelling out sums as paltry as $1,000.

Gordon Jones, a mud engineer killed on the Deepwater rig, left behind a pregnant wife who had quit her job to stay home with their 2-year-old son. But thanks to DOHSA, the most BP could owe them is the equivalent of Gordon's salary over his working life, minus what he would have paid out in taxes and personal expenses. So if Gordon made $60,000 a year for the next 30 years, BP could owe the family less than a million dollars.

The math works out even worse for workers without dependents. Jones' brother Chris testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee that one of the other Deepwater workers who was killed was single and childless. That means his family would only be entitled to recover funeral expenses under DOHSA. But because his body was never recovered after the explosion, the funeral costs will be lower. BP could end up paying his family as little as $1,000 for their loss.

Chris and his father Keith have pleaded with Congress to fix the law so that any employer can be held accountable for negligence—regardless of whether an employee dies on land or at sea. Last week, Senate Judiciary chair Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., introduced legislation that would do just that.

But Leahy's bill faces an ugly political fight. And giant oil corporations—the most obvious potential opponents of such legislation—may not even have to flex their lobbying muscle. There's another powerful industry with an interest in doing BP's dirty work to preserve the status quo. That would be cruise line operators—and when it comes to Beltway battles, the cruise lobby is no Love Boat.

Just ask Son Michael Pham, the vice president of the International Cruise Victims Association. In 2005, his parents went on a Caribbean cruise and never came back. Carnival Cruise Line, one of the world's largest cruise operators, never offered any explanation for what had happened, and has refused to discuss the incident with Pham and his family since then. That was how Pham discovered the horrible divide in the way the law treats people killed through negligence at sea. "We couldn't take legal action to get justice," he says. Long before the BP explosion, his group was lobbying Congress for DOHSA to be overhauled.

DOHSA was created in 1920 to ensure that the widows and children of seamen could get a share of their husbands' or fathers' salaries if they were killed at sea. The law was rather progressive for its time: Previously, the corporations didn't have to pay the widows anything at all. But DOHSA didn't change with the times. And because it's a federal law, it trumps state tort laws that allow injured people to recover all sorts of damages in personal injury cases, including punitive damages for truly egregious corporate behavior, compensation for grief or the loss of companionship, and even the pre-death pain and suffering of the victim.

DOHSA has been updated once, in 2000, when TWA Flight 800 crashed off the coast of New York, killing a host of children. Their families had had no legal rights to force the airline to pay out, because the kids didn't have income. That year, Congress amended DOHSA, but only to allow commercial airline victims to sue for noneconomic damages. The families of other folks killed at sea were still out in the cold.

Finally, in 2009, the cruise ship victims succeeded in getting legislation introduced with help from Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., that would have updated DOHSA in just the way Leahy has proposed. That change would have allowed families of cruise ship victims to sue for noneconomic damages—a huge deal for cruise-goers, because so many are retired and have no salaries that would provide the basis of a legal award under the current law. It also would have saved the Jones family a trip to Washington, D.C., to plead their case on behalf of Gordon's widow and children.

But the cruise industry spent $2.2 million fighting these changes. The Carnival cruise line company alone has donated more than $400,000 since 2007 to members of Congress from both parties, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. The offending provision was eventually removed from the cruise-ship safety bill.

The Cruise Lines International Association did not return requests for comment. But Pham says he has no doubt that the DOHSA revision will not slip by without the lobbyists' notice. "Cruise lines absolutely didn't want DOHSA to be part of that [2009 bill] at all," he says, noting that the industry would suddenly become liable for all sorts of incidents that it's currently able to dodge legal responsibility for—everything from onboard murders to rapes to mysterious disappearances like that of Pham's parents. "It's an industry that self-polices. When there's an incident on board, there's nobody but themselves investigating themselves. You're not going to turn yourself in."

Pham suggests that perhaps his group should join forces with the families of the deceased Deepwater workers. "Hopefully the current issue with BP will keep this issue in front and create more public awareness," he says. But, as he points, it's unfortunate that it "takes a tragic incident like [the Gulf spill] for people to realize they've been taking this for granted."

This story was produced by Mother Jones as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.

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Screwed if by Sea: A 90-year-old maritime law gets BP off the hook for workers killed on the Deepwater rig.
CL Solutions To Provide Munox® For Petroleum Surface Spill Remediation Including Marine Spills. On Environmental ExpertCL Solutions, LLC is pleased to announce that they will be the distributor of Munox® for petroleum surface spills. This development comes in response to interest in using Munox® for cleaning shore and near-shore environments impacted by the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. CL Solutions was selected by Osprey Biotechnics, Inc. to provide distribution and technical support for this application based on the 10-year relationship between the companies during which CL Solutions has provided technical support for remediation of petroleum contaminated soil and ground water.

Munox® is a consortium of naturally-occurring microbes selected for their ability to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons. Osprey Biotechnics formulated Munox® in partnership with the US EPA Design for the Environment program.
it was on the news that a dead whale was found offshore in the gulf "but they are testing to see if it is oil related" jeez louise. I kinda understand local officials are trying to paint a rosey picture to hopefully improve the already ruined tourist economy but at some point now they need to quit spending money on "come on down! The beaches are clean!" to saving things.
Whew!!! well I posted my homework for the day -- you know no matter how hard I try -- I can't find any good news...... well, that Mushroom Idea was a step in a positive direction.

GOOD NEWS - DiveSon has surfaced : ) Received word last evening from his Girlfriend. He spoke w/her yesterday, he is on the MightyServant III in the Gulf.....SURROUNDED....by oil.

Feeling a bit better since I know for sure which ship he's on - slept through the night for the first time since he's been gone. Wish I could personally deliver some fresh baked cookies & brownies -
There's been a lot of talk about building berms and artificial islands. HEre's a nice Sharon Begley article on why it's probably not a good idea:


Don’t Just ‘Do Something’
We must put science first in the gulf.
Sharon Begley for Newsweek

Scientists are such spoilsports, always insisting on gathering data on the likely effects of a strategy before implementing it. Politicians are more inclined to just go for it, especially when they’re desperate. Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal is desperate: millions of gallons of BP’s crude are launching an amphibious assault on his beaches and wetlands. So let’s do the math: desperation + a pol’s “do something” mentality = a loony decision to build 14-foot sand berms to protect the state’s coastline—a decision that bodes ill for the many others the state will face as BP’s oil gushes at least until August.

Before this, Jindal was known to scientists as the governor who in 2008 signed a law allowing the state’s public schools to teach creationism (excuse me! “intelligent design”) in their classrooms. The difficulty he has distinguishing science from faith reared its ugly head again when he cast about for a way to hold back BP’s oil. Emissaries from Jindal’s office have made regular pilgrimages to the Netherlands to consult with engineers about protecting the state’s coasts from the next Katrina. Van Oord, a marine engineering and dredging company that is constructing the artificial Palm Islands for Dubai, proposed building what amounts to artificial sandbars. “If you ask a Dutch company that builds artificial islands in Dubai how to protect marshlands and barrier islands,” says coastal geologist Rob Young of Western Carolina University, “of course they’ll say, ‘Let’s make an offshore island!—and shall we put a palm tree on it for you?’

The sandbars would stand in front of barrier islands in seven to eight feet of water and rise another six feet. The hope is that they would trap incoming oil before it despoils the islands. Oil caught in the sandbars would be collected by scooping up the sand, which is why coastal geophysicist Joe Kelley of the University of Maine calls them “sacrificial berms.” The sandbars should also channel oil toward tidal inlets, where booms and skimmers could collect it before it infiltrates wetlands, which serve as vital nurseries for fish and birds.

Nothing like this has ever been tried, and the potential problems are legion. For starters, the 45 miles of berms the Army Corps of Engineers has OK’d will take six months to build, and “is going to start to erode and disappear immediately,” says Young. “I wouldn’t be surprised if by the time they get to the end the beginning is gone—and that’s without a storm.” (Scientists predict this hurricane season will be one of the worst in years.)

But heck, it’s BP’s money ($360 million for the berms alone, to be constructed by The Shaw Group Inc. of Baton Rouge, though the feds and state would have to front it and hope to be repaid), so who cares if the berms have to be rebuilt over and over? The real problem could be if they last long enough to block inlets that carry water to the wetlands on shore. If that happens, notes Young, “organisms that need to move in and out with tidal flushing won’t. You could kill the wetlands without the oil ever reaching them.” If they don’t block the inlets, then oil will reach the wetlands, and they’ll be toast. (If you think it’s tough to clean oil from a bird or beach, try cleaning it from the roots and stems of a wetland’s grass and reeds.) Altering tidal currents could also cause erosion of the natural barrier islands that protect the coast from hurricanes. “This could do more environmental harm than good,” says Young.

Other coastal scientists agree that berms will do nothing good other than satisfy the “do something” crowd. That’s why the decision sets such a terrible precedent. BP’s oil will assault the gulf, and possibly the Atlantic, for years. Many more decisions that turn on science lie ahead. No one is saying we have to launch a multiyear study before each one, but it would be nice to get the smartest coastal scientists and engineers around a table to hammer out what we know, what we don’t know, and what the risks and benefits of proposed actions are, rather than just winging it.

When a politician is faced with an economic or social mess, the “just try something” mentality can be justified. Policies on these fronts cannot be accurately predicted for the simple reason that human behavior is involved. No amount of science can reliably forecast the effects of, say, financial or health-care reform, so a reasonable case can be made for “do something.” Not so when we’re talking about the laws of physics and chemistry rather than human behavior. In these cases, ignoring the science makes politicians seem like petulant children.
Mighty Servant III- hope this is the right boat

Quoting aquak9:
Mighty Servant III- hope this is the right boat



Oh YESSSSSSS - that's it!!! just bummed I can't find it on any of the ship tracker maps - a friend who sorta knows about these things says it may not show as it's not registered in the states or it may not show due to security (???) I'm hoping he'll call me next....I have my question list waiting, though I am glad he called his Lady first...
oooops - one more for show & share:
Scenario:
A group of people destroy a city park and are told they have to clean it up and will have to pay and will be punished for it.

Ok, they know they will have to pay and will be punished, how well do you think they are actually going to clean it up??? And won't they hide any incriminating evidence? And they will lie about how it happened.

BP has caused the mess, they have to pay, and be punished. Now they have to clean it up, they will hide evidence, they will lie about the severity of the damage, they will not restore the Gulf as we knew it.

What's wrong with all of this??? It's like letting a criminal return to the scene of the crime. Wake up, FEDS!
NOAA Conducts Tests to Determine Fate of Whale Found Dead in Gulf of Mexico
Whale Not Found in Oiled Water, but Cause of Death Unknown


On Tuesday, June 15, the NOAA Ship Pisces reported a dead sperm whale floating 77 miles due south of the Deepwater Horizon spill site. NOAA is currently in the process of conducting thorough testing to determine the circumstances surrounding the mammal’s death, as well as collect information about its life. This is the first dead whale reported since BP’s rig exploded on April 20. It was not found in oiled waters; however, its location of death is unknown.
As soon as the whale was sighted, Pisces Field Party Chief Paul Felts called the marine mammal hotline to report the finding to the Wildlife Branch of the Unified Command and NOAA’s marine mammal experts.

Based on the estimated size of the whale, scientists believe it is a sub-adult. Its condition suggests it may have been dead for between several days to more than a week. Although it was not found in oiled water, NOAA marine mammal experts are using hindcasting analysis to look into the location from which the whale carcass may have drifted.
While it is impossible to confirm whether exposure to oil was the cause of death, NOAA is reviewing whether factors such as ship strikes and entanglement can be eliminated. Samples collected from this carcass will be stored under proper protocols and handed off when the Pisces comes to port on July 2, or possibly if another boat is sent to meet the Pisces. Full analysis of the samples will take several weeks.
In accordance with the Wildlife Branch protocols, NOAA’s Southeast Regional Marine Mammal Stranding Coordinator Blair Mase requested that the NOAA field crew take photographs of the approximately 25-foot whale, collect skin swab for oil analysis, collect blubber and skin samples for analysis, and measure its height in the water. Although the whale is very decomposed, the photographs and samples will help scientists better understand how long it has been dead. The blubber and skin samples will be used for genetic analysis and to determine the sex of the animal. Measurements of the whale floating in the water will be used to determine how far and how fast it might have floated from where it died. The carcass has been marked so that aerial reconnaissance teams will be able to identify the individual and will not report it as a new mortality.
NOAA and the Unified Command Wildlife Branch have had numerous reports of sperm whales seen swimming in the oil, but this is the first confirmed report of a dead whale since the BP oil spill began. NOAA remains concerned about sperm whales, which are the only endangered resident cetaceans in the upper Gulf of Mexico. Sperm whales spend most of their time in the upper Gulf offshore area, live at depth in areas where subsurface dispersants and oil are present, and feed on deepwater squid, which may also be impacted by the oil and dispersants.
The NOAA Ship Gordon Gunter sailed yesterday for a multi-week cruise to do photo identification, assessments, tagging, biopsies, and prey-density studies for sperm whales and Bryde’s whales. Nearshore and offshore response efforts are continuing, and include investigations to determine cause of death or illness for dolphins that have stranded and aerial surveys for cetaceans throughout the area. The information gained from these efforts will help assess the impacts of this event on cetaceans in the Gulf of Mexico.
obama done good. he deserves some credit i think!
The carcass has been marked so that aerial reconnaissance teams will be able to identify the individual and will not report it as a new mortality.

this reminds me, of when they went house-to-house, after Katrina, spray-painting the houses with marks.
sigh...the oil spill feed is bigger than the camera screen...
you know, this whole deal is like it would be if chernoble said "gosh our area was destroyed and those left alive are so impacted by this disaster, yet we need to try and save all the plutonium that leaked cause it is valuable and clean up the town later and all these people that died, who knows, they may have been getting cancer anyway or prone to it genetically! and so many worked at the plant! look at the jobs lost! but since no one can live here for fifty years, lets put up a new plant outside the dead zone caused by the old one. and that dead siberian tiger, we need to do some tests to find out if he died from tapeworms or plutonium poisoning..." its just like that!!! I am gonna email obama and tell him. obama must be getting pretty sick of my emails by now but i contributed money to his campaign, twenty dollars, and he owes me.
"Tar balls continue to reach shore this morning, and while beaches are open the advisory against swimming remains in effect. Destin Pass, closed last night, will reopen at low tide today, then be closed later to prevent oil intrusion as the tide rolls inward. Meanwhile, skimmers are working the waters and cleanup crews are working on land to remove oil as quickly as possible."
From the Emerald Coast Convention and Visitors Bureau, Inc.
They are doing everything they can to keep people coming - which is good. My only concern is what about the Corexit in the water? How can it affect people??
So many unknowns....
Video from Surfrider's Emerald Coast Chapter Chairman

Our Emerald Coast Chapter Chair was invited to go out with the Coast Guard this past Sunday. Below is the video he would like to share with you all. Instead of going 10 miles out as planned they had run into oil at only 2.5 miles. Our own members have already been injured while surfing in Panhandle waters due to advisories not be properly posted by officials. In addition ISD events had to be canceled because of oil washing ashore.

Please take a moment to view this video and pass it on.

Link
innocent bystander- excellent article, discussing the honest truth about those berms. Sadly I'm afraid most of those points raised are correct.

What do you think?

Wednesday, June 16, 2010
State of the Spill - Week 8
Spill Size/Extent
Size: 62,244,000 gallons (57 days)

Note: Surfrider’s estimate of the spill volume is based on a rate of 26,000 barrels per day. The most recent estimate of the continuing rate of the oil gusher is between 35,000 and 60,000 barrels per day (1,470,000 to 2,520,000 gallons per day). If the release has been at that rate since Day 1, the total volume of oil released is now between and 84 and 144 million gallons.

NOAA’s new GeoPlatform.gov/gulfresponse online tool provides nearshore and offshore “spill trajectory estimates” for the current oil plume and the next two days. This view shows the current plume, the location of “beached oil” and surface water currents.

State of Efforts to Stop Flow
BP’s “top hat” containment system is collecting around 15,000 barrels of oil per day, although substantial amounts of oil are still escaping through vent valves on the containment dome. BP has been ordered to step up their efforts to capture more of the oil. Their latest response letter (also discussed here) details plans to collect 40,000-53,000 barrels per day of oil by June 30.

Meanwhile, BP continues to drill two “relief wells” that are intended to intercept the blown-out well at a depth of about 16,000 feet. Drilling mud and cement would then be pumped into the well to seal it. The wells will take at least two more months to drill. Read more.

Ecological Damage
The GeoPlatform.gov/gulfresponse online tool can be configured to show the confirmed dolphin and sea turtle strandings as well as the fishery closure area.
The Daily Dead Wildlife Tally shows the current number of birds, sea turtles and marine mammals that have been found dead in the oil spill area.
8 A.M. UPDATE: Tar balls still heavy, boom not fully deployed

8 A.M. UPDATE: Tar balls are heavily concentrated on the stretch of Okaloosa Island near the pier, both on the beach and in the waters just off shore, according to visual reports Thursday morning.


The beaches were largely empty, though a few people still walked along the sand. One, a visitor from Ohio, had been out walking the night before and realized too late that she had been stepping on tar balls.
(cont.)
Quoting Beachfoxx:
8 A.M. UPDATE: Tar balls still heavy, boom not fully deployed

8 A.M. UPDATE: Tar balls are heavily concentrated on the stretch of Okaloosa Island near the pier, both on the beach and in the waters just off shore, according to visual reports Thursday morning.


The beaches were largely empty, though a few people still walked along the sand. One, a visitor from Ohio, had been out walking the night before and realized too late that she had been stepping on tar balls.
(cont.)


Dr Masters used your picture of the tar balls in the main blog :)
Thanks Big Fish - I did not know. Not a great photo considering I used my Iphone. But it gets the point across.....
Quoting Orcasystems:


Dr Masters used your picture of the tar balls in the main blog :)
Crude Oil Faqs

Petroleum products and their relative share of total U.S. petroleum consumption in 2008:

Gasoline 46%
Diesel Fuel1 18%
Jet Fuel (Kerosene) 8%
Propane/Propylene 6%
NGL & LRG2 5%
Still Gas 3%
Residual/Heavy Fuel Oil 3%
Petrochemical Feedstocks 3%
Heating Oil3 3%
Petroleum Coke 2%
Asphalt and Road Oil 2%
Lubricants 1%
Miscellaneous Products 0.3%
Special Naphthas 0.2%
Aviation Gasoline 0.1%
Kerosene 0.1%
Waxes 0.05%
Quoting surfmom:


Oh YESSSSSSS - that's it!!! just bummed I can't find it on any of the ship tracker maps - a friend who sorta knows about these things says it may not show as it's not registered in the states or it may not show due to security (???) I'm hoping he'll call me next....I have my question list waiting, though I am glad he called his Lady first...

No foreign vessels are allowed in the Gulf due to the Jones act of 1920, until the government waives the act for this disaster thats the way it will stay.
That should have happened 50+ days ago - more than 13 countries have offered aide.

What's happening is a disgrace.
Quoting silvercloud80:

No foreign vessels are allowed in the Gulf due to the Jones act of 1920, until the government waives the act for this disaster thats the way it will stay.
From:
183. miamiamiga 10:26 AM CDT on June 17, 2010
(posted on Dr. M's Blog)
Plant-based plastics would work for more disposable items (and are better for our environment). Industrial hemp and corn both can produce plastics that can last at least 3-5 years, plenty long enough for disposable medical items, food and drink packaging, trash bags, etc. AND they are biodegradeable. With some research and development, we might even be able to create plant-based plastics that could withstand the test of time for those items that need to last longer than 5 years (in this day and age, there is not much need for that on the regular consumer end of things).

There are ways to drastically reduce the use of petroleum based products. I do not know where you get your information or how you form your opinions, but there are many small businesses and entrepreneurs turning out alternatives to petroleum based products. With some support from the government to streamline the manufacturing process and ramp up production we could start using those products within a couple of years on a MASS scale.

Unfortunately, big oil would like everyone to think they are indispensable. They are not. Granted, it will take time to wean our economy off of petroleum, but that time period would be MUCH shorter if people would inform themselves of what the alternatives are and then give their politicians the support they need to take on big oil (or elect politicians that are willing to do so).

For more information on this subject (I am in no way promoting any one organization or product here, just information):

http://www.chej.org/BESAFE/pvc/bioplastics.htm

I hope you take the time to read, infomr yourself, and perhaps understand there ARE new ways of doing things ALL THE TIME. Status quo is NOT necessary.

BREAKING NEWS: U.S. Supreme Court affirms right to renourish beaches
Comments 11 | Recommend 1
June 17, 2010 9:39 AM
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court has affirmed a ruling allowing Florida to undertake beach-widening projects without paying beachfront property owners who lose exclusive access to the water.

The court, by an 8-0 vote Thursday, rejected a challenge by six homeowners in Florida's panhandle who argued that a beach-widening project changed their oceanfront property into oceanview. Justice John Paul Stevens took no part in the case.

Private property advocates had hoped the court would rule for the first time that a court decision can amount to a taking of property.
I posted this yesterday


"BP has not said how much oil is beneath the Gulf seabed Deepwater Horizon was tapping, but a company official speaking on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the volume of reserves, confirmed reports that it was tens of millions of barrels – a frightening prospect to many." (Associated Press)
The days since we first learned of the Deepwater Horizon Oil spill have been an emotional rollercoaster ride for us all. It is difficult not to be fearful, sad, angry and frustrated with what has taken place. From the beginning, we have known that we would most likely see some type of impact from the oil spill on our beaches and we have been consistently reassured by BP and unified command that the proper resources to protect our vital and sensitive bays and estuaries were in place. However, the recent limited success of the Pensacola pass booming and the system currently in place for our inshore response has affected our level of confidence. We are unsure what type of oil products may make their way to our shores and are dumfounded as to why more resources have not been pre-positioned in our area to respond.

From the onset of this event, we knew that the magnitude and command structure meant that we could not respond as a stand alone entity, nor did we have the staff or financial resources to do so effectively. Hurricanes have taught us well that in any emergency, information and plans can change very rapidly as the incident unfolds. In a hurricane event, the county and state response system works extremely well. However with the oil spill, we often feel helpless and angry at BP and the federal response through unified command, because of their response to these changes and their abilitlty to communicate clearly and effectively to us what is actually happening.

I want to ensure the citizens of Santa Rosa County that we are not sitting and waiting for someone else to take care of us. It has been our belief and it has been proven over the last few weeks, that no-one knows our county and its waterways, tides, and wildlife as well as those who live here. Over the last month and a half, your commission and your county staff have spent countless hours working through the response system. We have tried to listen, research, and make fiscally sound requests to protect our over 88 miles of coast line - some requests were approved and others denied. As we continue to prepare for the unknown, I wanted to update our reisdents on our recent actions:

1. Three of our additional boom sites were approved today including: Mulat Bayou - 775 feet of boom, Soundside Drive Bayous in - 520 feet of boom, and the extreme eastern portion of East River in Holley - 1,900 feet of boom.

2. Our county protection analysis group is looking again at the feasibility of utilizing filter fabric in some of the sensitive grassy shoreline to determine the effectiveness against submerged tarballs. In the past, concerns have been the ability to keep this type of material in place, actual effectiveness, and most of all the damage that might be caused by the physical placement and maintenance of such material. Tidal flows can exert a tremendous force that can dislodge even well ancoured material.

3. A request has been made to unified command for double booming of most of the areas that are currently boomed.

4. A request has been made to pre-position reconnaissance and recovery assets near Pensacola pass due to the reoccurrence of product in the Pensacola Bay.

5. After verifying each boom location on Saturday morning, we noticed that the boom was not being maintained properly and we developed a plan for local water reconnaissance teams to check boom daily and provide reports on possible oil product sightings, including photos and GPS coordinates.

6. A staff member from Santa Rosa County Emergency Management was placed in Unified Command on June 12 located in Mobile, AL to represent Santa Rosa, Escambia and Okaloosa counties and help ensure rapid response and better communications between the counties and Unified Command. Each county will have the option to send a staff member to represent the three county area, rotating every seven days. We hope this position will be able to evaluate the source of the operational and planning issues that we have been so frustrated by over the last month, and pinpoint changes we can request to improve the response to protect Santa Rosa County waters.

7. We will continue to issue the latest information as we know it and update our Deepwater Horizon webpage at www.santarosa.fl.gov.

I recognize what I have shared with you does little to abate the fears we all share, and does little to guarantee that our inland waters will not be impacted. What I am confident of is the strength of our community, which lies in our citizens' ability to overcome adversity. As this event continues to unfold, I am sure that the emotional roller coasster will continue to have highs and lows for us all. I promise each and every resident that we will continue to work long hours to push for change and the additional resources that we feel is needed to respond to this event from the unified command and our state and federal officials.

Cordon Goodin

Commission Chair & District 4 Commissioner

Santa Rosa County

**Santa Rosa Co is just west of us - Navarre Beach area**
Hi Em,

Yes, he said that the first part ofMay - we are now into the middle of June & I'm sure that we are looking at a much worse scenario than we were 45+/- days ago. Everyday the news gets worse...

Here is a link to your quote: Link

Hope you are feeling better!
Heard this news last night and it may be of interest and a help to some. I'm sure some already know about it, but just in case, I thought I'd post it here. This happens to be an article from Des Moines, but NYT and WSJ or other sources may have more info...

Link: Link

Citi, Fannie, Freddie Offer Gulf Mortgage Relief
Citi, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac Offer Foreclosure, Payment Suspension To Gulf Homeowners.(AP)


DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) - Homeowners in areas of the Gulf of Mexico affected by the BP oil spill can get mortgage relief from Citigroup Inc. and government sponsored mortgage purchasers Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

Citigroup says it is suspending loan foreclosures in the region through Sept. 17.

Fannie Mae says companies servicing its home loans may suspend or reduce borrower payments for up to 90 days. Additional time may be granted after a review of individual circumstances.

Freddie Mac spokesman Brad German said it also offers relief for a variety of reasons, including loss of income.

The eight-week-old oil disaster is affecting the coasts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida.

Citigroup's home mortgage division said Wednesday it is suspending loan foreclosures in the region through Sept. 17, and that borrowers with first mortgage loans owned by CitiMortgage who meet certain criteria will not be subject to foreclosure sales or foreclosure notifications.

"In the midst of this crisis, we will continue to explore ways to help people avoid foreclosure so they and their families can remain in their homes and have one less thing to worry about," Citigroup CEO Vikram Pandit said in a statement.

CitiMortgage borrowers occupying homes in zip codes within 25 miles of affected coastal areas will be eligible.

The eight-week-old disaster, in which tens of thousands of gallons of oil still pour from the broken deepwater well daily, is affecting the coasts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida.

Fannie Mae said companies servicing its home loans may immediately suspend or reduce payments for borrowers whose property or income are negatively affected for up to 90 days. Additional time may be granted after a review of individual circumstances.

"We want to give homeowners every opportunity to weather this unprecedented disaster, including relief from their mortgage payment if that will help them get back on their feet and stay in their homes," CEO Michael J. Williams said in a statement.

Borrowers seeking relief under Fannie Mae's or Freddie Mac's special relief measures should contact their mortgage servicer.

Take care of you and yours, and head in hands always for the whole Gulf from me and mine.
-jus-



Yesterday, NOAA added
2,564 square miles to the closed fishing area, near Panama City, FL;
change takes effect at 6 p.m. EDT. The closure is now 80,806 square
miles, about 33% of the federal waters in the Gulf. Closing fishing in
these areas is a precautionary
I am so sorry. Your beaches are now the victims of the oil spill. Horrible, just horrible. No amount of money BP puts aside for this disaster can bring back the pristine beaches, the destroyed wildlife, the loss of jobs, the heartache caused to those of us who care,....
Prayers for mother nature.
My friend Paula posted this on Ffacebook:

Quoting innocentbystander:
There's been a lot of talk about building berms and artificial islands. HEre's a nice Sharon Begley article on why it's probably not a good idea:


Don%u2019t Just %u2018Do Something%u2019
We must put science first in the gulf.
Sharon Begley for Newsweek

Scientists are such spoilsports, always insisting on gathering data on the likely effects of a strategy before implementing it. Politicians are more inclined to just go for it, especially when they%u2019re desperate. Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal is desperate: millions of gallons of BP%u2019s crude are launching an amphibious assault on his beaches and wetlands. So let%u2019s do the math: desperation a pol%u2019s %u201Cdo something%u201D mentality = a loony decision to build 14-foot sand berms to protect the state%u2019s coastline%u2014a decision that bodes ill for the many others the state will face as BP%u2019s oil gushes at least until August.

Before this, Jindal was known to scientists as the governor who in 2008 signed a law allowing the state%u2019s public schools to teach creationism (excuse me! %u201Cintelligent design%u201D) in their classrooms. The difficulty he has distinguishing science from faith reared its ugly head again when he cast about for a way to hold back BP%u2019s oil. Emissaries from Jindal%u2019s office have made regular pilgrimages to the Netherlands to consult with engineers about protecting the state%u2019s coasts from the next Katrina. Van Oord, a marine engineering and dredging company that is constructing the artificial Palm Islands for Dubai, proposed building what amounts to artificial sandbars. %u201CIf you ask a Dutch company that builds artificial islands in Dubai how to protect marshlands and barrier islands,%u201D says coastal geologist Rob Young of Western Carolina University, %u201Cof course they%u2019ll say, %u2018Let%u2019s make an offshore island!%u2014and shall we put a palm tree on it for you?%u2019

The sandbars would stand in front of barrier islands in seven to eight feet of water and rise another six feet. The hope is that they would trap incoming oil before it despoils the islands. Oil caught in the sandbars would be collected by scooping up the sand, which is why coastal geophysicist Joe Kelley of the University of Maine calls them %u201Csacrificial berms.%u201D The sandbars should also channel oil toward tidal inlets, where booms and skimmers could collect it before it infiltrates wetlands, which serve as vital nurseries for fish and birds.

Nothing like this has ever been tried, and the potential problems are legion. For starters, the 45 miles of berms the Army Corps of Engineers has OK%u2019d will take six months to build, and %u201Cis going to start to erode and disappear immediately,%u201D says Young. %u201CI wouldn%u2019t be surprised if by the time they get to the end the beginning is gone%u2014and that%u2019s without a storm.%u201D (Scientists predict this hurricane season will be one of the worst in years.)

But heck, it%u2019s BP%u2019s money ($360 million for the berms alone, to be constructed by The Shaw Group Inc. of Baton Rouge, though the feds and state would have to front it and hope to be repaid), so who cares if the berms have to be rebuilt over and over? The real problem could be if they last long enough to block inlets that carry water to the wetlands on shore. If that happens, notes Young, %u201Corganisms that need to move in and out with tidal flushing won%u2019t. You could kill the wetlands without the oil ever reaching them.%u201D If they don%u2019t block the inlets, then oil will reach the wetlands, and they%u2019ll be toast. (If you think it%u2019s tough to clean oil from a bird or beach, try cleaning it from the roots and stems of a wetland%u2019s grass and reeds.) Altering tidal currents could also cause erosion of the natural barrier islands that protect the coast from hurricanes. %u201CThis could do more environmental harm than good,%u201D says Young.

Other coastal scientists agree that berms will do nothing good other than satisfy the %u201Cdo something%u201D crowd. That%u2019s why the decision sets such a terrible precedent. BP%u2019s oil will assault the gulf, and possibly the Atlantic, for years. Many more decisions that turn on science lie ahead. No one is saying we have to launch a multiyear study before each one, but it would be nice to get the smartest coastal scientists and engineers around a table to hammer out what we know, what we don%u2019t know, and what the risks and benefits of proposed actions are, rather than just winging it.

When a politician is faced with an economic or social mess, the %u201Cjust try something%u201D mentality can be justified. Policies on these fronts cannot be accurately predicted for the simple reason that human behavior is involved. No amount of science can reliably forecast the effects of, say, financial or health-care reform, so a reasonable case can be made for %u201Cdo something.%u201D Not so when we%u2019re talking about the laws of physics and chemistry rather than human behavior. In these cases, ignoring the science makes politicians seem like petulant children.
Sometimes winging it works. My dad is not very educated and has never liked scientists, but he winged it once with a tree to get it down and it worked. Sure, the tree could have come down on the house or him or ruined the car. He used the car to pull the tree in a certain direction as he was using his chainsaw to cut it. I'm sure that scientists would not have allowed him to do it probably for a myriad of reasons, but my dad is a do it yourself kind of guy. It worked out. It might not always work out, but it does sometimes. Of course, he didn't want to pay anyone to do it because he wanted to save money (I kept telling him that if it fell on the house or ruined the car or him then he wouldn't be saving any money... i told him to pay someone to do it because then they're liable for damages). In this case, they're trying to save time. All I know is that people who like to "do something" can do more than people give them credit for. I wouldn't be surprised if their ideas actually worked, but they might not. Life is a bitch.

Me, I always worry too much about things we don't understand 100%.
J- Joe Barton (R- Texas) is like a puppet to the BP string. No one with an iq over 75 is taking him seriously. This trauma to the coastal psyche goes way above the pettiness of the few who are so unhappy because they are worried their BPac will bcutt off....

I am wondering out loud about mass mitigation and those on the LA coast, who face a bleak future, will have to move and find a new way to live....
Post 789 - SEAWITCH -
wonderful video, even if I cried ~ they are my friends,they are such special creatures, surf with them once and you're never the same ~ they don't deserve any of this..........
seawitch, oh that dolphin video was phenomenal. praying that this oil can not and will not destroy all the wonderful creatures and life of the Gulf. I have seen blogs surfmom has written about the dolphins surfing with her, but I didnt know they would actually turn circles out of the water.
surfmom, I was right behind you with my post. hope you didnt mind I mentioned you. But it was an emotional video. prayers have gone out at my church for you, your son and all of the Gulf Coast.
Quoting robinvtx1215:
surfmom, I was right behind you with my post. hope you didnt mind I mentioned you. But it was an emotional video. prayers have gone out at my church for you, your son and all of the Gulf Coast.


No (((Worries))) & hugs for your thoughts....
JFLA - Joe Barton retracted his idiotic statement this afternoon, after people called for his resignation (NPR) so you see: keep your eye on thetrauma and leave out the drama...
Hi, BF. Long time lurker. I lived many years in Mobile, and am just too sad for words. I am in south Texas now, and the oil has not affected South Padre........yet. I've taken my daughters there the last 5 weekends, taking pictures, and shedding tears. My thoughts & prayers are with you and all my coastal buddies. May God help us.

Steve
When BP CEO Tony Hayward testified before Congress this morning, many expected to hear him apologize for the disaster his company has caused. Instead, GOP Congressman Joe Barton was the one saying he was sorry -- to BP.

In his opening statement, Barton, the top Republican on the committee overseeing the oil spill and its aftermath, delivered a personal apology to the oil giant. He said the $20 billion fund that President Obama directed BP to establish to provide relief to the victims of the oil disaster was a "tragedy in the first proportion."

Other Republicans are echoing his call. Sen. John Cornyn said he "shares" Barton's concern. Rep. Michele Bachmann said that BP shouldn't agree to be "fleeced." Rush Limbaugh called it a "bailout." The Republican Study Committee, with its 114 members in the House, called it a "shakedown."

Let's be clear. This fund is a major victory for the people of the Gulf. It's a key step toward making them whole again. BP has a responsibility to those whose lives and livelihoods have been devastated by the disaster. And BP oil executives don't deserve an apology -- the people of the Gulf do.
I was down at the Pier on OK Island around 3pm, and there was no oil in the water and the beaches had been cleaned. People were in the water. This stuff is going to come and go.
Seawitch

*sob* what a beautiful video....

As we took our boat over the dry storage Tuesday, we had a pod of dolphins playing around us, they are magical & no matter my mood, they bring me a smile.
Yes, I was on OKI, and the Destin beaches today,
like the tides ebb & flow,
the oil will come & go.

Quoting sugarsand:
I was down at the Pier on OK Island around 3pm, and there was no oil in the water and the beaches had been cleaned. People were in the water. This stuff is going to come and go.
Soloco - Steve,

Welcome to the blog... I'm glad you taken your girls to the beach, those memories will last forever.
Its our tears that keep the Gulf salty. We all are hurting as we watch this horror unfold day after day. Go to the beach again this weekend, take your girls & create new memories - they will help carry you through the difficult days ahead. : )
Peace be with you & yours.
Quoting soloco:
Hi, BF. Long time lurker. I lived many years in Mobile, and am just too sad for words. I am in south Texas now, and the oil has not affected South Padre........yet. I've taken my daughters there the last 5 weekends, taking pictures, and shedding tears. My thoughts & prayers are with you and all my coastal buddies. May God help us.

Steve
This is sad...

LA cleanup crews trampled pelican nests

Venice, Louisiana (CNN) – Crews cleaning up the oil in one Louisiana parish have trampled the nests and eggs of birds including the brown pelican, which came off the endangered species list last year, the head of the parish said Wednesday.

Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser said the parish doesn't want to turn away contractors, but he called for more care when crews work in the sensitive wetlands.

He said officials recently found broken eggs and crushed chicks on Queen Bess Island, near Grand Isle.

Plastic bags containing snare boom were "recklessly placed" around the island without consideration for wildlife. In one picture released by the parish, a plastic bag was on top of a nest containing broken speckled eggs.



Solid sheen seen 1 mile off Destin, sheen lurking by Blue Mountain Beach
Clumps of tar balls and solid sheen were seen 1 mile off Destin Thursday morning.

A State Emergency Response Team recon report reads, "EMERGENCY CLEAN UP REQUIRED!!!"

A line of tar balls one foot wide, stretching 10 miles to the south was seen a few miles south of the Destin Pass at about 8 a.m., according to another recon report. Other lines of tar balls and a 5-mile east-to-west red streak of possible oil product was also seen south of Destin.

Three to four acres of tar balls were several miles south of Sandestin.

Three "streamers" of oil product about five miles long were seen about a mile off Air Force property this morning. Later, at about 4 p.m., a 25-square mile area of "streamers" was seen five miles off Air Force property.

In Walton County, about one mile of 30-yards wide sheen washed up "in a trough next to the beach" at Blue Mountain Beach at 2:15 p.m.
(cont....)
Oiled bird found on Okaloosa Island; county to lift swimming advisory
June 17, 2010 3:49 PM
Florida Freedom News
3 p.m. UPDATE: Tar balls that began washing up on the Okaloosa Island beach Wednesday morning, and were discovered there again this morning, had stopped arriving by mid-afternoon and the decision has been made to lift a swimming advisory.

Dr. Karen Chapman with the Okaloosa County Health Department and Tracey Vause, the chief of the county's beach safety division, made the call after walking the beach.

"They're lifting it. It's clean out there," said Okaloosa County Public Safety Director Dino Villani.

Meanwhile, an oiled northern gannet was found on Okaloosa Island around 2 p.m. Thursday, according to the State Emergency Response Team.

The bird was not badly oiled. The Emerald Coast Wildlife Refuge held the bird until U.S. Fish and Wildlife came to take the bird for cleaning.


Quoting Beachfoxx:
This is sad...

LA cleanup crews trampled pelican nests

Venice, Louisiana (CNN) %u2013 Crews cleaning up the oil in one Louisiana parish have trampled the nests and eggs of birds including the brown pelican, which came off the endangered species list last year, the head of the parish said Wednesday.

Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser said the parish doesn't want to turn away contractors, but he called for more care when crews work in the sensitive wetlands.

He said officials recently found broken eggs and crushed chicks on Queen Bess Island, near Grand Isle.

Plastic bags containing snare boom were "recklessly placed" around the island without consideration for wildlife. In one picture released by the parish, a plastic bag was on top of a nest containing broken speckled eggs.





You know when everyone was complaining about it taking so long to close off passes in Louisiana they were trying to figure stuff out.

The state understandably wants to move quickly and on a large scale, and no one wants to stop a project like this simply because it is spending too much of BPs money. The problem, however, is that the berms wont work as promised, and their construction will monopolize resources that could be used more effectively elsewhere.

Moreover, both agencies note that the berms are not designed to block the tidal flow of water completely, which would be deadly to the wetlands they are meant to protect. But that makes it unclear how much oil the berms would actually prevent from passing into the marshes and estuaries, even when the project is completed.

A completed berm could potentially increase the impact of storm surges on the coastal lowlands, and instead of blocking oil it could merely redirect the natural tidal flow and with it thousands of gallons of oil to even more environmentally important areas. Likewise, by impeding the outflow of water, it could prevent the natural flushing of some oil.

Robert Young is a professor of coastal geology and director of the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University.




The problem is no one knows and I hate that the loudest voice is selected over the most reasonable.
I know you probably dont wan to hear this, but its nice to see the oil is only washing up in tarball form so far there beach.
Hi JFL,
I hope that's all we see... we've got many days to go before the spewing at the rig stops & its taken this long for it to get here, so will we have oil, tarballs hitting our beaches 60 days after they stop the spew????

gotta go walk the poodles......
Later.
Quoting JFLORIDA:
I know you probably dont wan to hear this, but its nice to see the oil is only washing up in tarball form so far there beach.
Hi Foxxy, drifting by to check the updates : (

If the relief wells don't work we're screwed

and according to some /most of the guys on The Oil Drum IF I understand what they're saying... these guys aren't too optimistic : (

See you in the morning : )

Quoting JFLORIDA:
I know you probably dont wan to hear this, but its nice to see the oil is only washing up in tarball form so far there beach.


hubby says the oil on the beach is the smaller part of the disaster -- it's the overall ecology of the Gulf water that's the real peril -- how much can she take before the scale is irreversibly flipped to a dead zone.

not to negate your situation Foxxy or anyone's anywhere -- tar and beach, tar & wetlands don't mix
My turn is coming... I'm just further down stream.
I FOUND DIVESON'S SHIP!!!!
going to have to pull the map off this post...the ships/boats are moving... I just watch the orion, a tug move up next to the Mighty Servant -
Raw video
Gulf Shores and Orange Beach flyover Jun 16th 2010 Gulf Oil Spill
Two things to notice - first the obvious, the oil, although there are times I'm not sure if I'm seeing sheen or the sandbar, but the oil is easy to see otherwise, even on the beach - second, the lack of people on the beach, it should be full of tourists, and now it should be full of cleanup workers.

I'm not too optimistic either knowing what I know. : (

Going to go to Nick's in the Sticks - Blue Crab for dinner, feel like my last supper. : (
Quoting surfmom:
Hi Foxxy, drifting by to check the updates : (

If the relief wells don't work we're screwed

and according to some /most of the guys on The Oil Drum IF I understand what they're saying... these guys aren't too optimistic : (

See you in the morning : )

Dan,

Wow - not good. No tourist, no clean up crews...

More later.

Blue Crabs for dinner!
I have to say, as much as I think fossil fuels are bad (and they are), it is a shame that they are just burning off the gas and now oil being collected - they ought to instead sell it (and the money does not go into BP's profits - how much could they raise for relief efforts?):

Subsea operational update:
Optimization of the dual system, LMRP Cap and the Q4000 Direct Connect, will continue over the next few days.
For the first 12 hours on June 17 (midnight to noon), approximately 8,000 barrels of oil were collected and approximately 4,500 barrels of oil and 25.8 million cubic feet of natural gas were flared.
On June 16, a total of approximately 14,750 barrels of oil were collected and approximately 3,850 barrels of oil and 40 million cubic feet of natural gas were flared.


For comparison, you will breath only 13 million cubic feet of air in an entire lifetime.
Quoting Beachfoxx:
I'm not too optimistic either knowing what I know. : (

Going to go to Nick's in the Sticks - Blue Crab for dinner, feel like my last supper. : (


Hope there's not 13 people at the table. ;>)
I knew you would! LOL
I told you I thought I had found the Orion... but wasn't sure if it was the same! : )
Happy you found it.

Quoting surfmom:
I FOUND DIVESON'S SHIP!!!!
going to have to pull the map off this post...the ships/boats are moving... I just watch the orion, a tug move up next to the Mighty Servant -
Just 13 Blue Crabs! hehehehehehe
Quoting PcolaDan:


Hope there's not 13 people at the table. ;>)
Quoting surfmom:


hubby says the oil on the beach is the smaller part of the disaster -- it's the overall ecology of the Gulf water that's the real peril -- how much can she take before the scale is irreversibly flipped to a dead zone.

not to negate your situation Foxxy or anyone's anywhere -- tar and beach, tar & wetlands don't mix
My turn is coming... I'm just further down stream.


Of course - I don't even think about the death, suffering and sickness occurring in the open ocean now.

But not only was I thinking of the difficulty in removing liquid oil form soils (as in the Valdez disaster) but I was also worrying about all the dispersant used so deep and cold moving along the shelf and coming to the surface far away with the VOCs and and high levels of dispersant still attached.
824. mobal
A Small Persons kwik Thoughts

1. The Cleanup effort has been a joke, 20 minutes of every Human hour! Garbage bags and fish nets!

I know there are now some more things now being used, 60 days in!

2. The response is pitiful, from BP and the Feds.

3. Blood suckers…..also known as Vampires, or in this case lawyers are all ready on TV.

4. Folks that claim false damage, inflating it or flat out falsifying claims are just as bad as lawyers!

We need to fix the leak; it seems that some have forgotten about that….

The rest will fall into place some way, good or bad. But every day it leaks is another month of issues IMO.

Off my soap box….
Link Gulf oil full of methane, adding new concerns.NEW ORLEANS – The crude gushing from the ruptured well in the Gulf of Mexico contains vast amounts of natural gas that could pose a serious threat to the ecosystem.

John Kessler is a Texas A&M University oceanographer. He says the oil emanating from the seafloor contains about 40 percent methane — compared with about 5 percent found in typical oil deposits.
This spill is about to make me go back in days to my redneck ways...:))
Quoting outrocket:
This spill is about to make me go back in days to my redneck ways...:))


we all wish we could go back in days, rocket ♥

nice video surfmom.
>WARNING - THIS IMPORTANT READ ISN'T GOING TO MAKE YOUR DAY
Is the BP Gusher Unstoppable?
By Julia Whitty

June 17, 2010 " Mother Jones" -- Sharon Astyk at ScienceBlogs points the way to a seriously scary comment thread at The Oil Drum, a sounding board for, among others, many petroleum geologists and oil professionals. The comment in question is from a seemingly very knowledgable "dougr." Some of it follows verbatim below. I've highlighted the parts that frightened me the most and left me wondering: Is this why Obama's praying?

You can read the comment in its entirety here, [ http://www.theoildrum.com/node/6593#comment-648967] complete with useful links, as well as all the comments (some of which dissent from dougr's claims) made in response. Sharon notes, to the inevitable question of why pass along an anonymous comment: "This one passes my smell test, which is usually pretty good - that doesn't mean I claim commenter Doug R is right - it means I think his information is interesting enough to be worth exposing to a wider audience for clarification or correction." As the Oil Drum staff explains to it's own readers regarding this post: "Were the US government and BP more forthcoming with information and details, the situation would not be giving rise to so much speculation about what is actually going on in the Gulf. This should be run more like Mission Control at NASA than an exclusive country club function--it is a public matter--transparency, now!" Amen. Meanwhile, judge for yourself:

"All the actions and few tid bits of information all lead to one inescapable conclusion. The well pipes below the sea floor are broken and leaking. Now you have some real data of how BP's actions are evidence of that, as well as some murky statement from "BP officials" confirming the same.
"To those of us outside the real inside loop, yet still fairly knowledgeable, [the failure of Top Kill] was a major confirmation of what many feared. That the system below the sea floor has serious failures of varying magnitude in the complicated chain, and it is breaking down and it will continue to.
"What does this mean?
"It means they will never cap the gusher after the wellhead. They cannot...the more they try and restrict the oil gushing out the bop?...the more it will transfer to the leaks below. Just like a leaky garden hose with a nozzle on it. When you open up the nozzle?...it doesn't leak so bad, you close the nozzle?...it leaks real bad, same dynamics. It is why they sawed the riser off...or tried to anyway...but they clipped it off, to relieve pressure on the leaks "down hole". I'm sure there was a bit of panic time after they crimp/pinched off the large riser pipe and the Diamond wire saw got stuck and failed...because that crimp diverted pressure and flow to the rupture down below.
"Contrary to what most of us would think as logical to stop the oil mess, actually opening up the gushing well and making it gush more became direction BP took after confirming that there was a leak. In fact if you note their actions, that should become clear. They have shifted from stopping or restricting the gusher to opening it up and catching it. This only makes sense if they want to relieve pressure at the leak hidden down below the seabed.....and that sort of leak is one of the most dangerous and potentially damaging kind of leak there could be. It is also inaccessible which compounds our problems. There is no way to stop that leak from above, all they can do is relieve the pressure on it and the only way to do that right now is to open up the nozzle above and gush more oil into the gulf and hopefully catch it, which they have done, they just neglected to tell us why, gee thanks.
"A down hole leak is dangerous and damaging for several reasons. There will be erosion throughout the entire beat up, beat on and beat down remainder of the "system" including that inaccessible leak. The same erosion I spoke about in the first post is still present and has never stopped, cannot be stopped, is impossible to stop and will always be present in and acting on anything that is left which has crude oil "Product" rushing through it. There are abrasives still present, swirling flow will create hot spots of wear and this erosion is relentless and will always be present until eventually it wears away enough material to break it's way out. It will slowly eat the bop away especially at the now pinched off riser head and it will flow more and more. Perhaps BP can outrun or keep up with that out flow with various suckage methods for a period of time, but eventually the well will win that race, just how long that race will be?...no one really knows....However now?...there are other problems that a down hole leak will and must produce that will compound this already bad situation.
"This down hole leak will undermine the foundation of the seabed in and around the well area. It also weakens the only thing holding up the massive Blow Out Preventer's immense bulk of 450 tons. In fact?...we are beginning to the results of the well's total integrity beginning to fail due to the undermining being caused by the leaking well bore.
"The first layer of the sea floor in the gulf is mostly lose material of sand and silt. It doesn't hold up anything and isn't meant to, what holds the entire subsea system of the Bop in place is the well itself... The well's piping in comparison is actually very much smaller than the Blow Out Preventer and strong as it may be, it relies on some support from the seabed to function and not literally fall over...and it is now showing signs of doing just that....falling over...
"What is likely to happen now?
"Well...none of what is likely to happen is good, in fact...it's about as bad as it gets. I am convinced the erosion and compromising of the entire system is accelerating and attacking more key structural areas of the well, the blow out preventer and surrounding strata holding it all up and together. This is evidenced by the tilt of the blow out preventer and the erosion which has exposed the well head connection. What eventually will happen is that the blow out preventer will literally tip over if they do not run supports to it as the currents push on it. I suspect they will run those supports as cables tied to anchors very soon, if they don't, they are inviting disaster that much sooner.
"Eventually even that will be futile as the well casings cannot support the weight of the massive system above with out the cement bond to the earth and that bond is being eroded away. When enough is eroded away the casings will buckle and the BOP will collapse the well. If and when you begin to see oil and gas coming up around the well area from under the BOP? or the area around the well head connection and casing sinking more and more rapidly? ...it won't be too long after that the entire system fails. BP must be aware of this, they are mapping the sea floor sonically and that is not a mere exercise. Our Gov't must be well aware too, they just are not telling us.
"All of these things lead to only one place, a fully wide open well bore directly to the oil deposit...after that, it goes into the realm of "the worst things you can think of" The well may come completely apart as the inner liners fail. There is still a very long drill string in the well, that could literally come flying out...as I said...all the worst things you can think of are a possibility, but the very least damaging outcome as bad as it is, is that we are stuck with a wide open gusher blowing out 150,000 barrels a day of raw oil or more. There isn't any "cap dome" or any other suck fixer device on earth that exists or could be built that will stop it from gushing out and doing more and more damage to the gulf. While at the same time also doing more damage to the well, making the chance of halting it with a kill from the bottom up less and less likely to work, which as it stands now?....is the only real chance we have left to stop it all.
"It's a race now...a race to drill the relief wells and take our last chance at killing this monster before the whole weakened, wore out, blown out, leaking and failing system gives up it's last gasp in a horrific crescendo.
"We are not even 2 months into it, barely half way by even optimistic estimates. The damage done by the leaked oil now is virtually immeasurable already and it will not get better, it can only get worse. No matter how much they can collect, there will still be thousands and thousands of gallons leaking out every minute, every hour of every day. We have 2 months left before the relief wells are even near in position and set up to take a kill shot and that is being optimistic as I said.
"Over the next 2 months the mechanical situation also cannot improve, it can only get worse, getting better is an impossibility. While they may make some gains on collecting the leaked oil, the structural situation cannot heal itself. It will continue to erode and flow out more oil and eventually the inevitable collapse which cannot be stopped will happen. It is only a simple matter of who can "get there first"...us or the well."
Julia Whitty is the Environmental Correspondent for Mother Jones. Her latest book DEEP BLUE HOME : An Intimate Ecology of Our Wild Ocean will be out in July.
Found this page while driving my favorite Red-Eyed Mouse up and down the IntarTube(s) last night:
http://blog.alexanderhiggins.com/spill-chat.html
34 (more/less) live cam feed addresses, all in one handy place. (Not all actively streaming @ any given time, but plenty of material nonetheless.) To log into the chat room, enter a nick name and enter ##OilVent in the 'channels' field.
Just remember.... the chat room at #theoildrum has a few things in common with the comments section of Doc Master's blog.

Quoting shoreacres:
Just remember.... the chat room at #theoildrum has a few things in common with the comments section of Doc Master's blog.


Shore, you make a very Valid Point - you do have to "shift" through the information in the chat room, that said, journalist Julia Whitty, Mother Jones Magazine, does her homework.
829- well that was just sickening.
830- so you are saying there are doomcasters on the oil drum? no doubt.

Guess what. They're probably right.
If your still reading - might be time to add Rum or Kahlua

Link
BP Admits That - If It Tries to Cap the Leak - the Whole Well May Blow:
Oil industry expert Rob Cavner said that BP must "keep the well flowing to minimize oil and gas going out into the formation on the side"
Link
BP starts burning oil from leaking ruptured well.Once that gas reaches the rig, it will be mixed with compressed air, shot down a specialized boom made by Schlumberger Ltd. and ignited at sea. It's the first time this particular burner has been deployed in the Gulf of Mexico.
Keith Olbermann Interview With Riki Ott On BP Coverup Of Gulf Wildlife Kill

might be time to add Rum or Kahlua
no can do- been three years and I'm hanging tight....altho it sure would be nice to float away on that warm delicious feeling again, I do miss it.

BOP's gonna fail...not if, just when.
rikki Ott! yeah that's her. did a talk a few weeks back to like ten people i a park somewhere. Nobody really cared. It was a great coupla vids- "the herring never came back"

I like her spunk.

dare we hope for a hero on our side- that'd be Rikki Ott.
"A down hole leak is dangerous and damaging for several reasons. There will be erosion throughout the entire beat up, beat on and beat down remainder of the "system" including that inaccessible leak

My friends and I were speaking just of this last night at dinner, after show. Nothing like scrambled eggs and the BP mess to end your night.
The point brought up was this: How long can this take a hammering and not blow to kingdom come? We're not fancy brilliant engineers and came up with this scenario.....something's gotta give.
Please, Regular visitors & Lurkers, send this video Post#835 to everyone you know.................
wondering if there's a BP reason diveson is not being given access to communicate.....just wondering.....

Foxxy, the MightyServant III seems to be working in your "area".

Last post, the video, got me..... taking the dog to the beach b/4 office work & domestics. Got some boomers overhead -- goes perfect with my mood.

PRAYERS UP AND DEEP THANKS TO RIKI OTT - YOU ARE THE VOICE OF THE GULF - THANKS FOR STANDING UP WITH THE TRUTH
Big HUGS - AQUA!!!! - for you and me it's strong chamomile tea
Just one more note - the chat channel mentioned in #829 is #oilvent, which is NOT the same as the official Oil Drum chat channel. That's #theoildrum.
SURF says:
wondering if there's a BP reason diveson is not being given access to communicate...

or to the world, hon. Thats BP. Thats
the Problem.

But am so glad you located son. I know the relief...last night I found out there were over 30 tornadoes in Minnesota. I grabbed the cell to call him, woke him up asked him where the tornadoes were and he said,
"Not in the theater, Mom"

Good enough for me.

Off to start my day! Take care Aqua, Surf...
Beachie if you are around......
Hi I hope Shore is right!
Link Should you worry about burning the oil spill?As cleanup workers burn off oil from BP’s ruined Deepwater Horizon well, the black clouds of smoke soaring skyward are carrying questions about health risks, along with a thick helping of soot, volatile gases and other toxic byproducts.

The most immediate risk is to cleanup workers or others in proximity to the burn, according to Dr. Phil Harber, head of the division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.
Good Morning,

Roffs has a new summary dated 17 june. Perhaps someone could post it here.

Thanks
Quoting sugarsand:
I was down at the Pier on OK Island around 3pm, and there was no oil in the water and the beaches had been cleaned. People were in the water. This stuff is going to come and go.


no. it is there. there is nowhere it is not going, there is too much of it. those attending the meeting with walton co emer mgmnt officials yesterday said they were told the oil, the heavy slick, is five miles off shore and depending on the elements comes and goes closer then further, the tarballs are washing up now. eventually the tide will turn literally, and it will come just like it has at grand Isle. there is no way this can be avoided. its done now.
There was the time, before the explosion.

A few days of fire, and the sinking...we watched in horror.

Then the leak, the leak, the spew...12% closed to fishing. 17% closed to fishing. 34% closed to fishing.

Failed attempts at leak closure...we watched in horror.

Closer, closer, the smell, tarballs few and far between, now common place.

These are now the days, of watching communities die, both human and non-human. Watching the oil float closer and closer. Watching the BP and Gov't cover-ups. This is where we are at.

We watch in horror.

When the BOP goes belly-up, we will look back on these days, not quite so horrific in memory.

We look to the future, in horror.
Quoting aquak9:
There was the time, before the explosion.

A few days of fire, and the sinking...we watched in horror.

Then the leak, the leak, the spew...12% closed to fishing. 17% closed to fishing. 34% closed to fishing.

Failed attempts at leak closure...we watched in horror.

Closer, closer, the smell, tarballs few and far between, now common place.

These are now the days, of watching communities die, both human and non-human. Watching the oil float closer and closer. Watching the BP and Gov't cover-ups. This is where we are at.

We watch in horror.

When the BOP goes belly-up, we will look back on these days, not quite so horrific in memory.

We look to the future, in horror.



I am as optomistic as they come.......but sadly, you are spot on. What a legacy we are leaving for our children. All we can do is pray, and volunteer to clean up where we can.


Steve
we can pray this catastrophe
will turn the tide
we may get covered in oil
but perhaps those who operate in the shadows
will be exposed

and we stand up
From BP's website, Ballet at Sea:

Though there isn't oil close to shore, practices and rehearsals occur almost daily in preparation.

I was on a jack-up boat observing the practice operations several miles out of Bayou La Batre on a day when the ocean was calm, except for the groups of dolphins swimming around us. Even a shark came along to watch the show. Hot, humid conditions intensified by bright sunlight in a cloudless sky were actually made pleasant by the salty sea breezes topped off with lots of sunscreen and bottles of water.

Over about four hours we, all guests of Gulf Coast native Captain Wade and his local crew, enjoyed the spectacular ballet at sea. Mind you, these drills are executed by local shrimping captains on shrimping boats who know these waters and how to catch shrimp! Until a few weeks ago, they didn't work in tandem, making shapes with Navy-grade boom attached to skimming boats and equipment designed to capture oil.

Watching the captains weave the long black boom as seamlessly as a professional ballet troupe performs an intricate dance, I found it difficult to believe that the rehearsals only started some weeks ago.

From the relative comfort of a large square deck with a cold bottle of water always in hand, and an air-conditioned TV room with comfy sofas a level below, I witnessed beauty preparing to face the beast. Miss Jasmine, the most experienced local shrimping vessel, beautifully painted with a colourful dragon streaming along her sides, pulled the folded boom in place. Then gently pulling along her side, another vessel took on a rope from Miss Jasmine. With barely a pause, the two boats moved apart at the same speed, spreading the boom into a v-shape just like birds form in the sky.

As this unfolded, a Navy skimmer craft attached itself to the point. Gently caressing the sea surface, the three vessels circled and swirled, guiding the boom without changing the design.

A ballet at sea as mesmerising as any performance in a concert hall, and worthy of an audience in its own right.


The Rachel Maddow Show set this "news" to appropriate video.

When I first saw the video on her show, I thought it was another parody about the oil spill but someone from BP actually wrote that press release.
Hi all,

Thanks for the posts. I had an early morning appt. so I didn't get to see what was going on.

There is a grim sense of resignation in the air, people are angry, frustrated, sad, very sad to see what is happening. The fear palpitates through the bodies of people with every heartbeat. Anxiety over the future resonates in the gentle gulf breezes.


Oil relents; health advisory canceled

Tar balls that washed up on Okaloosa Island through the day Wednesday, and turned up again Thursday morning, had stopped arriving early enough in the day to allow the lifting of a swimming advisory.

The Okaloosa County Health Department announced at shortly after 4 p.m. it had canceled an advisory recommending swimmers stay out of the water on the island between the Eglin Air Force Base entrance and Beasley Park.

cont....
Quoting Beachfoxx:
Oil relents; health advisory canceled

Tar balls that washed up on Okaloosa Island through the day Wednesday, and turned up again Thursday morning, had stopped arriving early enough in the day to allow the lifting of a swimming advisory.

The Okaloosa County Health Department announced at shortly after 4 p.m. it had canceled an advisory recommending swimmers stay out of the water on the island between the Eglin Air Force Base entrance and Beasley Park.

cont....



somehow this bothers me...even though there is no heavy globs or tar balls...a nasty mix is still in the area with some having unseen sheens...We don't know whats really there yet or it's effects...We also don't know the human toleration for ANY amount of that cocktail.. We don't know about the dispersants you dont see(suspended) ...WHy swim or allow it??? Sounda like an open door for a state to be sued..
Rocket,

I have my misgivings about it as well. I think they should do water quality testing - checking for toxins from both the oil & the disperents... Just my humble opinion.
Quoting outrocket:



somehow this bothers me...even though there is no heavy globs or tar balls...a nasty mix is still in the area with some having unseen sheens...We don't know whats really there yet or it's effects...We also don't know the human toleration for ANY amount of that cocktail.. We don't know about the dispersants you dont see(suspended) ...WHy swim or allow it??? Sounda like an open door for a state to be sued..
TO GO or DO NOT PASS GO? Confusion reigns but 'we're going to keep fishing until we can't' (with CATCH-OF-THE-DAY-PHOTOS)
Link

Is East Pass open or closed?
Confusion ran rampant on the docks Thursday morning as captains and deckhands working on vessels of opportunity were waiting to see if they could get out of East Pass, while other captains loaded up their boats and headed out for fishing.
"We're just out here sweating to the oldies," said Capt. David Windes of the Seascape who is signed on as a vessel of opportunity.
Word went out Wednesday evening that East Pass was going to be closed. Some captains canceled trips, while others waited to see if it actually happened. Those signed up as BP contractors waited for orders for the day.
___
For more photos from the docks, click here
___ Capt. Jim Green of the New Florida Girl's American Spirit was one of the captains who didn.t cancel.
"We're just taking it day by day," Green said. %u201CIt all seems so imminent. But when I drove over the bridge this morning and there was nothing blocking the pass, the fishing trip was on.
"We never called and canceled last night ... and we had 63 lined up to go," Green said.
He and his 63 anglers headed out Thursday morning and brought in a fine catch. They pulled in king mackerel, red snapper, gag grouper, red grouper, triggerfish, white snapper and mingo.
"It was beautiful out, but it was slow pickings. And we didn't see any oil," Green said. They were fishing to the east of Destin.
And Green has plans to fish Friday.
"We're still taking names," he said. "They are going to have to physically stop us. We're going to keep fishing until we can%'t."

_____

clink link for more.....
not to mention the air gets worse the closer to the Coast you get...you never know the exact concentrations with the seabreeze...
Foxx I think the anger,sadness and other emotions are the same feelings we as Americans had 9/11 and thereafter for awhile. Who knows how long this round of feelings will last. I hate to think, that one day, this oil or the destruction will be a way of life for all of us .
Rocket,

So far the only time I can smell it is when they are burning and the wind is coming from the SW.

Robin,

The sadness & heartbreak is as numbing as it was after 9/11. I fear that this will have ramifications far into the future, both economically and ecological.
Dive Son is just south & west of us closer to Orange Bch.....
Quoting surfmom:
Please, Regular visitors & Lurkers, send this video Post#835 to everyone you know.................
wondering if there's a BP reason diveson is not being given access to communicate.....just wondering.....

Foxxy, the MightyServant III seems to be working in your "area".

Last post, the video, got me..... taking the dog to the beach b/4 office work & domestics. Got some boomers overhead -- goes perfect with my mood.

PRAYERS UP AND DEEP THANKS TO RIKI OTT - YOU ARE THE VOICE OF THE GULF - THANKS FOR STANDING UP WITH THE TRUTH
862. code1
Am extremely happy to report I am home, and went out early this morning to island, and to further east beaches in Destin. No tar balls, nor oil on the water did I see. Harbor was rocking as I drove across bridge last night. Traffic was backed up past Beach Dr. trying to get in. Looks to be a good weekend on tap. Yayyy
One ringy dingy in a minute foxx.
Quoting Beachfoxx:
Rocket,

So far the only time I can smell it is when they are burning and the wind is coming from the SW.

Robin,

The sadness & heartbreak is as numbing as it was after 9/11. I fear that this will have ramifications far into the future, both economically and ecological.


It was that way here...now any southerly wind brings it in...YUK!!!
I sense that they are going to increase flow estimates again soon...

ADEM boss says cleanup crews 'still losing the battle' against Gulf oil spill (with video)

DAUPHIN ISLAND -- More than 2 million gallons of oil are skimmed, burned or collected from the site of BP PLC's busted well every day, but cleanup crews are "still losing the battle," according to Bruce Freeman, chief of the office of emergency response at the Alabama Department of Environmental Management.


On the other hand, they continue to make progress in collecting the oil at the well:

Subsea operational update:
For the last 12 hours on June 17th (noon to midnight), approximately 8,020 barrels of oil were collected and approximately 4,770 barrels of oil and 24.5 million cubic feet of natural gas were flared.

Optimization of the dual recovery system continues; on June 17th, total oil recovered was aprox. 25,290 barrels.

* approximately 16,020 barrels of oil were collected,
* approximately 9,270 barrels of oil were flared,
* and approximately 50.3 million cubic feet of natural gas were flared.

Total oil recovered from both the LMRP Cap and Q4000 systems since they were implemented is approximately 204,200 barrels.
The free standing riser installation is progressing for the long term containment option.
The next update will be provided at 6:00pm CDT on June 18, 2010.


A lot is still leaking out though:

Hayward to play reduced role in spill response
CEO's comments 'have upset people,' chairman says in interview FROM MSNBC
STL - argh!!! those estimates keep increasing.... We will never know how much oil is truly leaking into the GOM.

Robin - Honestly, I'm not sure anyone from BP could say anything that would not "upset the people". LOL

Tony Hayward Puts Deputy in Charge of Oil Spill
Link
BP's problem is they started with a lie...
...But the damage they have done to their own image is far greater than the damage this spill will do to them...

Self Inflicted...

They caused the anger...

Had they been honest and forthcoming about this whole issue maybe we would have been more forgiving...

They lied and can't blame anyone else for their image but themself's.....


I guess now Tony gets his life back....he's damaged goods

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