Inland Colleton Severe Watches & Warnings NOAA Weather Radio

Watches & Warnings

Heat Advisory
Issued: 3:18 AM EDT Jun. 20, 2018 – National Weather Service

... Heat advisory in effect from noon today to 7 PM EDT this
evening...

The National Weather Service in Charleston has issued a heat
advisory, which is in effect from noon today to 7 PM EDT this
evening.

* Heat index values... 105 to 107 degrees.

* Timing... mainly this afternoon.

* Impacts... the heat and humidity may cause heat stress during
outdoor activities.

Precautionary/preparedness actions...

If you must be outdoors, drink plenty of fluids, wear light
weight clothing and stay out of direct sunshine. In addition,
know the signs of heat illnesses and be sure to check on those
who are most vulnerable to the heat such as Young children and
the elderly. Never leave children or pets in a vehicle.

To reduce risk during outdoor work, the occupational safety and
health administration recommends scheduling frequent rest breaks
in shaded or air conditioned environments. Anyone overcome by
heat should be moved to a cool and shaded location. Heat stroke
is an emergency - call 9 1 1.




Public Information Statement
Issued: 5:20 PM EDT Jun. 19, 2018 – National Weather Service

... Green Pond NOAA Weather Radio all hazards station will be off
the air until further notice...

NOAA Weather Radio all hazards transmitter wxj-23 operating on a
frequency of 162.450 mhz will be off the air until further
notice.

You can tune to station khb-29 at Charleston on a frequency of
162.550 mhz, station kec-85 at Savannah on a frequency of
162.400 mhz or station khc-29 at Barnwell on a frequency of
162.500 mhz to get your latest weather information.


520 PM EDT Tue Jun 19 2018

... Green Pond NOAA Weather Radio all hazards station will be off
the air until further notice...

NOAA Weather Radio all hazards transmitter wxj-23 operating on a
frequency of 162.450 mhz will be off the air until further
notice.

You can tune to station khb-29 at Charleston on a frequency of
162.550 mhz, station kec-85 at Savannah on a frequency of
162.400 mhz or station khc-29 at Barnwell on a frequency of
162.500 mhz to get your latest weather information.



1022 am EDT Mon Jun 18 2018

... Heat safety tips...

Oppressive heat and humidity is expected across much of the
region this week. Now is a good time to review some safety
information on excessive heat. This information is provided by the
American Red Cross and the National Weather Service.

Excessive heat and humidity will make for dangerous conditions if
proper precautions are not taken. Excessive heat kills people by
taking away the capability of the human body to cool itself.
Approximately 175 americans die each year from exposure to
excessive heat. If working outside, take frequent breaks and
drink enough water to remain hydrated.

Dress for the heat. Wear lightweight, light colored clothing.
Light colors will reflect away most of the sun's energy. It is
also a good idea to wear hats or to use an umbrella.

Drink water. Carry water or juice with you and drink continuously
even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid alcohol and caffeine which
dehydrate the body. Avoid using salt tablets unless directed to
do so by a physicians.

Eat small meals and eat more often. Avoid high protein foods
which increase metabolic heat.

Slow down. Avoid strenuous activity. If you must do strenuous
work, do it during the coolest part of the day. This is usually
in the morning between 4 and 7 am.

Stay indoors when possible. If air conditioning is not available,
stay on the lowest floor out of sunshine. Remember
that electric fans do not cool, they simply circulate air.

Be a good neighbor. During heat waves, check in on elderly
residents in your neighborhood and those who do not have air
conditioning.

Pets can also succumb to the effects of excessive heat. Ensure
pets have adequate fresh drinking water and a shady place to
rest. Do not keep pets in cars with the windows rolled up, even
partially. Temperatures inside cars can reach well over
150 degrees.

Remember, the heat index is measured under shady conditions so
direct exposure to sunshine will increase the heat index by as
much as 15 degrees.

Never leave a child in a car with the windows rolled up, even for
a few minutes.

Know the signs of heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

... Heat cramps...
heat cramps are muscular pains and spasms due to heavy exertion.
Although heat cramps are the least severe, they are an early
signal that the body is having trouble with the heat.

... Heat exhaustion...
heat exhaustion typically occurs when people exercise heavily or
work in a hot, humid place where bodily fluids are lost through
heavy sweating. Blood flow to the skin increases, causing blood
flow to decrease to the vital organs. This results in a form of
mild shock. If not treated, the victim may suffer heat stroke.
Signals of heat exhaustion include cool, moist, pale flushed or
red skin, heavy sweating, headache, nausea or vomiting, dizziness
and exhaustion. Body temperature will be near normal.

... Heat stroke...
also known as sunstroke, heat stroke is life threatening. The
victim's temperature control system, which produced sweat to cool
the body, stops working. The body temperature can rise so high
that brain damage and death may result if the body is not cooled
quickly. Signals include hot, red and dry skin. Changes in
consciousness. Rapid, weak pulse and rapid, shallow breathing.
Body temperature can be very high, sometimes as high as
105 degrees.



1022 am EDT Mon Jun 18 2018

... Heat safety tips...

Oppressive heat and humidity is expected across much of the
region this week. Now is a good time to review some safety
information on excessive heat. This information is provided by the
American Red Cross and the National Weather Service.

Excessive heat and humidity will make for dangerous conditions if
proper precautions are not taken. Excessive heat kills people by
taking away the capability of the human body to cool itself.
Approximately 175 americans die each year from exposure to
excessive heat. If working outside, take frequent breaks and
drink enough water to remain hydrated.

Dress for the heat. Wear lightweight, light colored clothing.
Light colors will reflect away most of the sun's energy. It is
also a good idea to wear hats or to use an umbrella.

Drink water. Carry water or juice with you and drink continuously
even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid alcohol and caffeine which
dehydrate the body. Avoid using salt tablets unless directed to
do so by a physicians.

Eat small meals and eat more often. Avoid high protein foods
which increase metabolic heat.

Slow down. Avoid strenuous activity. If you must do strenuous
work, do it during the coolest part of the day. This is usually
in the morning between 4 and 7 am.

Stay indoors when possible. If air conditioning is not available,
stay on the lowest floor out of sunshine. Remember
that electric fans do not cool, they simply circulate air.

Be a good neighbor. During heat waves, check in on elderly
residents in your neighborhood and those who do not have air
conditioning.

Pets can also succumb to the effects of excessive heat. Ensure
pets have adequate fresh drinking water and a shady place to
rest. Do not keep pets in cars with the windows rolled up, even
partially. Temperatures inside cars can reach well over
150 degrees.

Remember, the heat index is measured under shady conditions so
direct exposure to sunshine will increase the heat index by as
much as 15 degrees.

Never leave a child in a car with the windows rolled up, even for
a few minutes.

Know the signs of heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

... Heat cramps...
heat cramps are muscular pains and spasms due to heavy exertion.
Although heat cramps are the least severe, they are an early
signal that the body is having trouble with the heat.

... Heat exhaustion...
heat exhaustion typically occurs when people exercise heavily or
work in a hot, humid place where bodily fluids are lost through
heavy sweating. Blood flow to the skin increases, causing blood
flow to decrease to the vital organs. This results in a form of
mild shock. If not treated, the victim may suffer heat stroke.
Signals of heat exhaustion include cool, moist, pale flushed or
red skin, heavy sweating, headache, nausea or vomiting, dizziness
and exhaustion. Body temperature will be near normal.

... Heat stroke...
also known as sunstroke, heat stroke is life threatening. The
victim's temperature control system, which produced sweat to cool
the body, stops working. The body temperature can rise so high
that brain damage and death may result if the body is not cooled
quickly. Signals include hot, red and dry skin. Changes in
consciousness. Rapid, weak pulse and rapid, shallow breathing.
Body temperature can be very high, sometimes as high as
105 degrees.


1021 am EDT Mon Jun 18 2018

... Review of the National Weather Service excessive heat
program...

Southeast South Carolina and southeast Georgia is no stranger to
excessive heat. However, there are times when unusually hot and
potentially dangerous conditions do occur. About 175 americans
succumb to the taxing demands of heat every year.

Forecasters at the National Weather Service in Charleston are
responsible for the timely issuance of watches, warnings and
advisories for excessive heat whenever conditions meet or exceed
regionally defined criteria.

For southeast South Carolina and southeast Georgia, the following
criteria are used to determine when watches, warnings
and advisories for excessive heat are issued:

... Excessive heat watch...
an excessive heat watch is issued whenever there is a 50 percent
or greater probability that maximum heat index values will meet
or exceed 115 degrees for at least two hours within 12 to
48 hours.

... Excessive heat warning...
an excessive heat warning is issued whenever there is an
80 percent or greater probably that maximum heat index values
will meet or exceed 115 degrees for at least two hours within
12 to 24 hours.

... Heat advisory...
a heat advisory is issued whenever maximum heat index values of
110-114 degrees are expected to occur for at least two hours.
Prior to July 1, the heat index criteria is 105-114 degrees.

Additional information, including safety information and fatality
statistics, can be found at the following web address:

Www.NWS.NOAA.Gov/om/heat/index.Shtml


1021 am EDT Mon Jun 18 2018

... Review of the National Weather Service excessive heat
program...

Southeast South Carolina and southeast Georgia is no stranger to
excessive heat. However, there are times when unusually hot and
potentially dangerous conditions do occur. About 175 americans
succumb to the taxing demands of heat every year.

Forecasters at the National Weather Service in Charleston are
responsible for the timely issuance of watches, warnings and
advisories for excessive heat whenever conditions meet or exceed
regionally defined criteria.

For southeast South Carolina and southeast Georgia, the following
criteria are used to determine when watches, warnings
and advisories for excessive heat are issued:

... Excessive heat watch...
an excessive heat watch is issued whenever there is a 50 percent
or greater probability that maximum heat index values will meet
or exceed 115 degrees for at least two hours within 12 to
48 hours.

... Excessive heat warning...
an excessive heat warning is issued whenever there is an
80 percent or greater probably that maximum heat index values
will meet or exceed 115 degrees for at least two hours within
12 to 24 hours.

... Heat advisory...
a heat advisory is issued whenever maximum heat index values of
110-114 degrees are expected to occur for at least two hours.
Prior to July 1, the heat index criteria is 105-114 degrees.

Additional information, including safety information and fatality
statistics, can be found at the following web address:

Www.NWS.NOAA.Gov/om/heat/index.Shtml