Tanker Drop (). Photo by anm8ed
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Tanker Drop

Uploaded by: anm8ed

Monday August 15, 2011

Leander, TX (Current Weather Conditions)

Caption: This fire destroyed 15 homes and burned about 30 acres. Was nothuge, but was in a populated area.

Manufacturer: NIKON CORPORATION

Model: NIKON D80

x-Resolution: 300.00

y-Resolution: 300.00

Resolution Unit: Inch

Software: AutoHDR v2.0.1

YCbCr Positioning: co-sited

Exposure Time: 1/125 sec.

FNumber: f/38.0

Exposure Program: Shutter priority

ISO Speed Ratings: 400

Exif Version: Exif Version 2.21

Components Configuration: Y Cb Cr -

Compressed Bits per Pixel: 4.00

Exposure Bias: 0.00 EV

MaxApertureValue: 5.00 EV (f/5.7)

Metering Mode: Center-Weighted Average

Light Source: 0

Flash: Flash did not fire.

Focal Length: 300.0 mm

User Comment: (

SubsecTime: 00

SubSecTimeOriginal: 00

SubSecTimeDigitized: 00

FlashPixVersion: FlashPix Version 1.0

Color Space: sRGB

PixelXDimension: 3872

PixelYDimension: 2592

Sensing Method: One-chip color area sensor

File Source: DSC

Scene Type: 1

CFA Pattern: 8 bytes undefined data

Custom Rendered: Normal process

Exposure Mode: Auto exposure

White Balance: Auto white balance

Digital Zoom Ratio: 1.00

Focal Length In 35mm Film: 450

Scene Capture Type: Standard

Gain Control: Low gain up

Contrast: Normal

Saturation: High saturation

Sharpness: Hard

Subject Distance Range: Unknown

InteroperabilityIndex: R98

InteroperabilityVersion: 0100

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Display: 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted
14. dixiedaughter
2:31 AM GMT on August 20, 2011
Awesome shot, so sorry about the fires!
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Member Since: January 15, 2010 Comments: 40614
13. MercForHire
3:23 AM GMT on August 18, 2011
I got slimed by that sh!t once, or something very much like it. It's a long story, but basically I was a professional structure firefighter who was on a short vacation & rode along with my dad one day into the logging woods. It was a bone-dry year with lots of fuel from an ice-storm the winter before. A seismic crew started a fire in a dry food-plot, accidently of course, which almost immediately hit the tops of the trees.

A Forest Service crew just happened to be in the area, which was at least 30 minutes from a paved road, maybe more. They sped into the logging deck & recruited the 6 of us + 1 D6 dozer. It was heading in the decks direction anyway, so we would have been fighting in soon either way ..... or running the other way.

Controlling it was never an option, with only about 12-14 of us including the seismic crew & FS guys, less than half with any fire training at all. The fire was VERY fast, hot, & dangerous, so the loggers & explosive guys were put on the safer edges & sides. Learning I was a professional FF'er, as were the FS crew, we worked closer to the front, trying to at least slow it down a tiny bit by removing plentiful fuel.

In truth, most of what we did was retreat, because of the extreme speed of the blaze & a brisk hot wind pushing it along a single direction. That retreat-thing didn't set well with me, since we try to advance if at all possible in structure fires. But wildland fires are a completely different animal, with completely different physics. And although I definitely understood fire better than the average person on the street, I didn't actually have wild-fire training. So I was only about 1/2 the fighter as the 3 FS guys.

That lack of experience with forest fires would come back & bite me a couple hours later. Help arrived within an hour or somewhat less .... LOTS of it, which was baddly needed, including a civilian SkyCrane, military Chinook, & a little later a civilian C-130. Everyone except Forest Service fighters & myself were sent further out along the fires flanks to begin building breaks. We stayed directly in front, only well down-range, to start the main break.

An FS dozer had did a real quick & dirty mini-break, while another was starting a wider break a few hundred feet further down. The 1st dozer went to join the 2nd dozer after his mini-break was plowed. I had been watching & learning from the FS fighters this whole couple of hours, so I now knew exactly how this wildland stuff was done.

The dozer gone off to join his buddy, we would march into the mini-break & quickly toss out as much fuel as we could. So all of what now was around 12-15 of us started heading that way .... or at least I THOUGHT all of us were. Due to that previously mentioned "advance" mentality, and feeling somewhat more confident in my new firefighting role, I made sure I was leading the whole group.

If I had looked back over my shoulder, I would have noticed everyone else not approaching the mini-break with my same gusto. And if I had been around one of the guys with radios, I would have known about an incoming C-130, loaded with retardent to be dropped parallel to our mini-break. And if I had paid a bit more attention to the FS guys, I would have heard more than a few quiet chuckles.

But I didn't, and the first thing I knew about what was going on was when a C-130 appeared from behind a nearby ridge, heading straight towards my standing spot. If I had been as fast as the fire was, I might have made it out dry. But I wasn't, and the result was a thoroughly applied layer of the slimiest sh!t I've ever had the privilege of being covered with. There was no shaking it off or rubbing it off. I actually had to PEEL it off as the sun's heat quickly metamorphisized it into something like a super-saturated layer of liquid plastic.

Later, after everyone had their laughs, I would learn this was once a very common way to "break in" a freshly assigned new wildland firefighter. Even though I was an urban fighter, & had been for years, I was still a firefighter & this was my very first forest fire in which "slime" was being used. Looking at it that way, I was actually quite honoured that these guys already considered me one of them. :)

I'm not sure if they still do this to new fighters. I went back to my apartment complex's, warehouses, & skyscrapers, where I stayed several more years. Never again did I fight a forest fire, although not because I didn't actually want to .... just simply never was in that type situation again. But my first, last, & ONLY wildland fire was a pretty memorable one. :)
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Member Since: August 28, 2006 Comments: 23
12. Douglas7
12:32 AM GMT on August 18, 2011
Not very many USFS Region 6 Fire crews I and Kraus hadn't painted back in the 90's.
We were in Grand Junction and were sent home
the day before Storm King...
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Member Since: August 17, 2011 Comments: 3
11. JFWellsPDX
8:56 PM GMT on August 17, 2011
Quoting Douglas7:
JF-Tanker 62, Larry Kraus was the Captain I
was the Co-Pilot, Tim McCoy. Worked for Cal from 1990 to '97 worked for Macavia/SisQ before that...
Miss Cal, and Hank Moore, and Dave Kelly...


Probably a good chance you dropped on me then. I know Brian Lash (67 I think) did once for certain because I was tickled that I got to call him in on a small initial attack fire south of Sisters. Was on the Sisters District in 93 and half of 94, Redmond Hotshots the second half of 94, Prineville Hotshots in 95. This one was from 95:

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Member Since: August 16, 2011 Comments: 2
10. Douglas7
7:37 PM GMT on August 17, 2011
JF-Tanker 62, Larry Kraus was the Captain I
was the Co-Pilot, Tim McCoy. Worked for Cal from 1990 to '97 worked for Macavia/SisQ before that...
Miss Cal, and Hank Moore, and Dave Kelly...
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Member Since: August 17, 2011 Comments: 3
9. Douglas7
7:34 PM GMT on August 17, 2011
JF-Tanker 62, Larry Kraus was the Captain I
was the Co-Pilot, Tim McCoy. Worked for Cal from 1990 to '97 worked for Macavia/SisQ beofre that...
Miss Cal, and Hank Moore, and Dave Kelly...
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Member Since: August 17, 2011 Comments: 3
8. JFWellsPDX
6:33 PM GMT on August 17, 2011
Quoting Douglas7:
Nice shot! tha tparticular Aircraft is one of Neputne, inc. Neptunes. P2V-7's I was an Airtanker Pilot for about 10 years up until
1997. Bulter Aircraft/TBM out of Redmond, Or.
Douglas DC7 mainly. Judging from the Color of the Retardant, I'd say It's a GTS (Gum thickened Slurry) Useful on Grass and small brush.
The P-2 has jet assist-two J-34 westinghouse jets.and Two Piston Wright 3350's good sucessful tanker aircraft.


Which tanker did you fly? Cal was my grandfather and I had plenty of tanker drops on me while I was a wildland firefighter. Just uploaded my own P2V photo.
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Member Since: August 16, 2011 Comments: 2
7. Douglas7
5:53 PM GMT on August 17, 2011
Nice shot! tha tparticular Aircraft is one of Neputne, inc. Neptunes. P2V-7's I was an Airtanker Pilot for about 10 years up until
1997. Bulter Aircraft/TBM out of Redmond, Or.
Douglas DC7 mainly. Judging from the Color of the Retardant, I'd say It's a GTS (Gum thickened Slurry) Useful on Grass and small brush.
The P-2 has jet assist-two J-34 westinghouse jets.and Two Piston Wright 3350's good sucessful tanker aircraft.
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Member Since: August 17, 2011 Comments: 3
6. OBXNCWEATHER
5:36 PM GMT on August 17, 2011
Awesome photo :)
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5. StephH
7:10 PM GMT on August 16, 2011
Great shot!
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Member Since: November 4, 2002 Comments: 740
4. CenTexWeatherGal
6:40 PM GMT on August 16, 2011
Great capture and nice series. Yes, I was watching the news (KXAN) last night and saw amateur video. That fire was moving fast!
Debbie
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Member Since: March 13, 2009 Comments: 1522
3. gilg72
3:34 PM GMT on August 16, 2011
Great shot of a Bad disaster. So sorry to see all these fires you've had in Tx. We've had so many in NM also this year. Hope they get it out soon.
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2. MeltBar
2:50 PM GMT on August 16, 2011
Great colors, and excellent timing. Love the ghosts of the propellers!
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Member Since: June 4, 2008 Comments: 92
1. RenoSoHill
2:08 PM GMT on August 16, 2011
Great capture. Must have been a fast fire to destroy so many homes so fast. I like your capture better than the one in your newspaper.
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Member Since: December 12, 2009 Comments: 18094

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About anm8ed

Lived in Texas most of my life. Recently moved back home after being in Northern California for 4 years. It's good to be back, but waiting for storms to happen is killing me. I want to see some good thunderstorms again.

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