GIANT Mushroom (Fall+colors ). Photo by katy99780
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GIANT Mushroom

Uploaded by: katy99780

Tuesday October 8, 2013

Haines, AK (Current Weather Conditions)

Caption: Maybe Golden Pholiota? Phaeolepiota aurea almost certainly of the family Cortinariaceae) AKA Alaskan Gold mushroom.

Manufacturer: Canon

Model: Canon EOS REBEL T3

Orientation: top - left

x-Resolution: 72.00

y-Resolution: 72.00

Resolution Unit: Inch

Software: QuickTime 7.6.6

Artist:

YCbCr Positioning: centered

Copyright: [None] (Photographer) - (Editor)

Compression: JPEG compression

Exposure Time: 1/30 sec.

FNumber: f/4.0

Exposure Program: Not defined

ISO Speed Ratings: 2000

Exif Version: Exif Version 2.2

Components Configuration: Y Cb Cr -

Shutter speed: 5.00 EV (APEX: 5, 1/32 sec.)

Aperture: 4.00 EV (f/4.0)

Exposure Bias: 0.00 EV

Metering Mode: Pattern

Flash: Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode.

Focal Length: 18.0 mm

User Comment:

SubsecTime: 26

SubSecTimeOriginal: 26

SubSecTimeDigitized: 26

FlashPixVersion: FlashPix Version 1.0

Color Space: sRGB

PixelXDimension: 4272

PixelYDimension: 2848

Focal Plane x-Resolution: 4720.44

Focal Plane y-Resolution: 4786.55

Focal Plane Resolution Unit: Inch

Custom Rendered: Normal process

Exposure Mode: Auto exposure

White Balance: Auto white balance

Scene Capture Type: Standard

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Display: 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted
23. CameraDiva
5:52 PM GMT on October 27, 2013
I have never seen such a large mushroom...thx for sharing Katy and congrats on the journal shot!~
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22. katy99780
5:49 PM GMT on October 27, 2013
Thanks so much love2shoot and Steve!

Update: Thanks to you Endlesshorizon, The magazine The Mushroom Journal agrees that this very likely is a Phaeolepiota aurea, (though they have NEVER seen or heard of one so BIG) and have asked permission to include one of my photos of it in their next issue! :)

Of course I said yes, what an honor!
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21. bananabender
6:08 AM GMT on October 27, 2013
Katy - I found your magic mushrooms - you sure you didn't get a new lens that you're experimenting with??? Great series, and thanks for letting us see your find.
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20. Love2shoot
3:29 PM GMT on October 19, 2013
Wow, what a trophy! Great shot. Gives a totally new meaning to mushroom picking....
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19. katy99780
4:31 PM GMT on October 18, 2013
Thank you Wanda, Endlesshorizon and Karen.

Endlesshorizon, I checked out your link, thank you!

I do think that's my mushroom, however they say their largest specimen had a 15 cm cap, mine was easily 40 cm.

But I will send them my photos, hopefully they will help identify! That would be so cool!
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18. tazphotogal
2:26 PM GMT on October 17, 2013
wow, so big!!! Katy, you have so menay things that amaze us. :0) I learn new stuff every day. Thanks for sharing. KAren :0)
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17. EndlessHorizon
8:43 AM GMT on October 17, 2013
Fantastic! I looked this up, wanting to know if it was edible or poisonous. It seems that it's edible, but tastes bitter, and it's a very rare mushroom (if it is what you've identified it to be). Most mycologists have never seen one.

Here's a link I found:

http://www.mushroomthejournal.com/bestof/Paurea.h tml

They'd probably be beside themselves with joy if you sent them your photos.

What a lucky find! Nice series, too.
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16. Wanda1948
6:43 PM GMT on October 16, 2013
Wow, what a great mushroom!
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15. katy99780
6:37 PM GMT on October 16, 2013
Thanks for stopping by friends!
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14. WeatherWise
6:23 PM GMT on October 16, 2013
Huge one!
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13. Bugmon
6:19 PM GMT on October 16, 2013
..one bite makes you larger..
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12. BriarCraft
7:42 AM GMT on October 12, 2013
Amazing!!!
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11. ChrisAnthemum
1:59 AM GMT on October 12, 2013
Thought it might be, Katy, but I didn't want to presume. Thanks!
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10. katy99780
1:56 AM GMT on October 12, 2013
:) Tis I Kathy.
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9. ChrisAnthemum
1:12 AM GMT on October 12, 2013
Looks like y'all are having a lot of fun(gi) with these mushrooms! What I'd like to know is, who is the owner of the smile, the one holding the 'shroom?
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8. katy99780
9:33 PM GMT on October 11, 2013
(somebody had to say it!)
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7. Cowgazer
7:00 PM GMT on October 11, 2013
Na! just a Fun-guy
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6. katy99780
6:56 PM GMT on October 11, 2013
Okay... maybe I'm glad I don't know how to 'introduce' this big fella in my woods... :P Even though it might not be the same...

Peter you are a fungus nerd too! :D
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5. Cowgazer
6:52 PM GMT on October 11, 2013
NB. The largest living organism ever found has been discovered in an ancient American forest. The Armillaria ostoyae, popularly known as the honey
mushroom (Honey fungus, UK) , started from a single spore too small to see without a microscope. It has been spreading its black shoestring filaments, called rhizomorphs,
through the forest for an estimated 2,400 years, killing trees as it grows.
It now covers 2,200 acres (880 hectares) of the Malheur National Forest, in eastern Oregon. The outline of the giant fungus stretches 3.5 miles (5.6
kilometres) across, and it extends an average of three feet (one metre) into the ground. It covers an area as big as 1,665 football fields. The
discovery came after Catherine Parks, a scientist at the Pacific Northwest Research Station in La Grande, Oregon, in 1998 heard about a big tree
die-off from root rot in the forest east of Prairie City.
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4. YouKnowWho
6:37 PM GMT on October 11, 2013
Wait, what?!
OMG! Cool!
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3. nanapoo
6:36 PM GMT on October 11, 2013
WHOA!!!!!!!!!!!!! My gosh!!!!
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2. katy99780
6:32 PM GMT on October 11, 2013
Yes... I wish I could bring back spoors or mycelium or SOMETHING to make this grow in my area. But I guess if it would survive my area, it'd already be here.

I couldn't help but think how many meals each of these would make! (if they were edible, not a clue what they are)
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1. Cowgazer
6:13 PM GMT on October 11, 2013
Wow that is a real giant, just imagine how far the underground parent of this must be.
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About katy99780

katy99780

I've lived in Alaska since 1969. I love this wild land. The extremes of the far north shape and affect every living thing. Extremes of weather, elevation, daylight hours, isolation, flora and fauna, nothing in Nature is insignificant.I have a Davis Vantage Pro weather station, uploading to Wunderground, (Turks on the Tundra) the National Weather Service, the Citizen Weather Observation Program and MADIS (Meteorological Assimilation Data Ingest System). "May you have warmth in your igloo, oil in your lamp, and peace in your heart." ~ Indigenous Arctic Proverb

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