Share this Photo

M82: Before and After SN2014J

Uploaded by: Raginar

Thursday January 30, 2014

Rapid City, SD (Current Weather Conditions)

Caption: M82 / SN2014J. This is before/after photos from SN2014J. I imaged this in RGB back in November and then took after-images from the supernova. These are important to us because they are very particular supernovae that release a set amount of light. Since you can figure out it's brightness relative to us, you can narrow down its distance from us pretty well. It's what astronomers refer to as the 'standard candle'. Pretty cool to watch a star go 'boom' over 12 million years ago! SN2014J image is us

Orientation: top - left

x-Resolution: 72.00

y-Resolution: 72.00

Resolution Unit: Inch

Software: Adobe Photoshop CC (Macintosh)

Color Space: sRGB

PixelXDimension: 1479

PixelYDimension: 1342

January 30, 2014 Photo Series

Viewer Comments

Post Your Comments

You must be signed in to leave comments.

or Join

Members can leave comments, upload and share photos in our Wunder Photos section and participate on the WunderBlogs.

Display: 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted
2. Raginar
4:27 AM GMT on February 04, 2014
Quoting bobcrunch:
I know about Cepheid variables, but I didn't know that supernovas could be standard candles. Good info. I'll get out my 10" SCT when it warms up.


I've got a 12" SCT as well. They're wonderful! Here is a link to an article on Type 1A supernovae: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Type_Ia_supernova

While they're not the primary method, they do provide a means of corroborating the data. Clear skies!
Action: Quote | Ignore User
Member Since: August 5, 2013 Comments: 28
1. bobcrunch
6:48 AM GMT on February 03, 2014
I know about Cepheid variables, but I didn't know that supernovas could be standard candles. Good info. I'll get out my 10" SCT when it warms up.
Action: Quote | Ignore User
Member Since: July 8, 2009 Comments: 203

Viewing: 2 - 1

Page: 1

Top of Page

About Raginar

Raginar

Amateur Astronomer. All pictures are taken from my observatory on the edge of Rapid City.

More Information