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World's Tallest Ferris Wheels: For Now, Las Vegas Takes The Prize

Associated Press
Published: April 1, 2014

A New Behemoth Opens

A general view of the Las Vegas High Roller under construction at The LINQ on March 21, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

Riders lined up in Las Vegas on Monday to get their first turns on a skyline-changing Ferris wheel, which opened as the world's tallest.

The 550-foot High Roller is part of $550 million restaurant, bar, retail and entertainment development built by casino giant Caesars Entertainment Corp. between its Flamingo, Harrah's and Quad hotel-casinos.

The Ferris wheel has 28 glass-enclosed, air-conditioned gondolas that can each hold up to 40 people. A full revolution takes 30 minutes. Tickets are $24.95 during the day and $34.95 at night.

Steve Sisolak, chairman of the Clark County Commission that governs the Strip, told the Associated Press: "This is going to be one of those things everyone who comes to Las Vegas is going to want to do."

The High Roller keeps its world's-tallest bragging rights until new wheels are completed in New York and Dubai in coming years.

The New York Wheel on Staten Island, scheduled to open in 2016, call for a 630-foot-tall observation wheel equal to about 60 stories, and the Dubai Eye is projected to stand 690 feet tall.

Check the following pages to see how the High Roller compares to other existing Ferris wheels around the world.


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