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Winter Storm Pax: Power Outages Remain in South Carolina, Georgia

Associated Press/weather.com
Published: February 16, 2014

Good Samaritans help push a stranded motorist stuck in deep snow on Stefko Boulevard Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014 in Bethlehem, Pa. (AP Photo/Chris Post)

Winter Storm Pax has long since passed through the South, but some residents of Georgia and South Carolina are still in the dark following the storm. 

Crews have made significant progress on getting the power back on for everyone in South Carolina.

Utility officials said about 64,000 customers in the state remained without electricity Sunday afternoon. That was down from 100,000 people without power when the day began. An ice storm knocked out power for about 350,000 customers in South Carolina Wednesday or early Thursday.

The state's 20 electric cooperatives, serving mostly rural areas, had 45,000 customers still without power. South Carolina Electric & Gas reported 15,000 outages and Duke Energy still had 4,100 customers without power.

SCE&G is reporting most of its outages in Aiken County, while Santee Electric Cooperative in Clarendon, Florence, Williamsburg and Georgetown counties still has more than 22,000 outages.

Most of those affected lost power Wednesday or early Thursday when Pax swept across southern and eastern parts of the state. Power crews have been out since working 16-hour shifts to try to get the electricity back on.

Utility officials say it will be later this week before everyone gets power back.

Customers in Georgia were also still experiencing power outages on Sunday.

As of 11 a.m. Sunday, Georgia's electric membership cooperatives (EMCs) are reporting approximately 20,800 customers without power as a result of snow and sleet blanketing much of north and central Georgia.

By Sunday night, less than 1,000 Georgia Power customers were without power in Georgia, as crews reported significant progress in restoring electricity in hard-hit east Georgia after this week's ice storm.

MORE: Winter Storm Pax From Space


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