Share

Winter Storm Pax: Power Outages Remain in South Carolina, Georgia

Associated Press/weather.com
Published: February 16, 2014

Good Samaritans help push a stranded motorist stuck in deep snow on Stefko Boulevard Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014 in Bethlehem, Pa. (AP Photo/Chris Post)

Winter Storm Pax has long since passed through the South, but some residents of Georgia and South Carolina are still in the dark following the storm. 

Crews have made significant progress on getting the power back on for everyone in South Carolina.

Utility officials said about 64,000 customers in the state remained without electricity Sunday afternoon. That was down from 100,000 people without power when the day began. An ice storm knocked out power for about 350,000 customers in South Carolina Wednesday or early Thursday.

The state's 20 electric cooperatives, serving mostly rural areas, had 45,000 customers still without power. South Carolina Electric & Gas reported 15,000 outages and Duke Energy still had 4,100 customers without power.

SCE&G is reporting most of its outages in Aiken County, while Santee Electric Cooperative in Clarendon, Florence, Williamsburg and Georgetown counties still has more than 22,000 outages.

Most of those affected lost power Wednesday or early Thursday when Pax swept across southern and eastern parts of the state. Power crews have been out since working 16-hour shifts to try to get the electricity back on.

Utility officials say it will be later this week before everyone gets power back.

Customers in Georgia were also still experiencing power outages on Sunday.

As of 11 a.m. Sunday, Georgia's electric membership cooperatives (EMCs) are reporting approximately 20,800 customers without power as a result of snow and sleet blanketing much of north and central Georgia.

By Sunday night, less than 1,000 Georgia Power customers were without power in Georgia, as crews reported significant progress in restoring electricity in hard-hit east Georgia after this week's ice storm.

MORE: Winter Storm Pax From Space


Featured Blogs

Odile Dumping Heavy Rains on Southwest U.S.; Edouard Becomes a Major Hurricane

By Dr. Jeff Masters
September 16, 2014

Residents of Mexico's Baja Peninsula are picking up the pieces after devastating Hurricane Odile smashed ashore at Cabo San Lucas near 12:45 am EDT Monday as a Category 3 storm with 125 mph winds. The San Jose del Cabo airport (7th busiest in Mexico) is closed until September 22, and the Cabo San Lucas airport may be closed until October. Fortunately, no deaths are being attributed to the hurricane--a tribute to the excellence of Mexico's civil defense system for hurricanes.

August 2014 Global Weather Extremes Summary

By Christopher C. Burt
September 12, 2014

August featured a record heat wave in the Baltics and Belarus, record cold in Northern Ireland, extreme rainfall events along the U.S. East Coast and in Michigan. Deadly flooding in Nepal and India killed at least 200 and Typhoon Halong hit Japan. A rare tropical storm struck the Big Island of Hawaii. Perth, Australia had its warmest August on record while Darwin measured its coldest August temperature on record.

Live Blog: Tracking Hurricane Arthur as it Approaches North Carolina Coast

By Shaun Tanner
July 3, 2014

This is a live blog set up to provide the latest coverage on Hurricane Arthur as it threatens the North Carolina Coast. Check back often to see what the latest is with Arthur. The most recent updates are at the top.

Tropical Terminology

By Stu Ostro
June 30, 2014

Here is some basic, fundamental terminology related to tropical cyclones. Rather than a comprehensive and/or technical glossary, this represents the essence of the meaning & importance of some key, frequently used terms.

2013-14 - An Interesting Winter From A to Z

By Tom Niziol
May 15, 2014

It was a very interesting winter across a good part of the nation from the Rockies through the Plains to the Northeast. Let's break down the most significant winter storms on a month by month basis.

What the 5th IPCC Assessment Doesn't Include

By Angela Fritz
September 27, 2013

Melting permafrost has the potential to release an additional 1.5 trillion tons of carbon into the atmosphere, and could increase our global average temperature by 1.5°F in addition to our day-to-day human emissions. However, this effect is not included in the IPCC report issued Friday morning, which means the estimates of how Earth's climate will change are likely on the conservative side.