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Winter Storm Falco Update: Roads Still Messy in New York and New England

Associated Press
Published: December 18, 2013

Snow that fell overnight in portions of New England was expected to impact morning commuters as the Northeast wrestled with Winter Storm Falco.

Much of the region escaped with up to a few inches of snow on Tuesday, but totals were much higher in Boston and northern New England, where snow fell late into the night, causing slippery conditions, minor accidents and delays.

(MORE: Real-Time Updates on the Storm | Check Airport Delays)

However, much of the area dealing with Falco's after-effects will see warmer temperatures by the weekend.

"A good part of the eastern U.S. is going to get warmer temperatures and rain," said Tom Niziol, winter weather expert at The Weather Channel. "It's probably going to erode away the snowpack."

New York

Icy road conditions caused portions of New York's heavily-traveled Long Island Expressway to be closed for up to two hours during rush hour. Authorities warned residents to stay off the roads. New York City airports were still struggling Tuesday night, still reporting delays of more than an hour, according to the website FlightAware.

In western New York, a car crashed on a snowy road, killing the 23-year-old driver and injuring four students and the bus driver.

Massachusetts

Boston set a daily record with 6.4 inches of snow on Tuesday, according to the National Weather Service.

The morning commute was a bit easier in Massachusetts after crews worked through the night to clear up to eight inches of snow that fell during the latest storm. The deteriorating conditions made for a long and miserable drive home for many people on Tuesday.

The heavy snow may also have been a factor in the derailment of a commuter train at the Intermodal Station in Fitchburg. The Sentinel and Enterprise reports that about 50 people were on the train at the time of the mishap shortly before 8 p.m., but no injuries were reported. Major highways around the state are in good shape for the Wednesday morning commute but some secondary roads could still be treacherous. The MBTA is reporting no major delays.

Connecticut

Schools across Connecticut are opening one to two hours late because of slippery roads and continued cleanup from Tuesday's snow storm. Waterbury, Danbury and New Britain are among the cities with delayed openings Wednesday.

As much as five inches of snow fell in Connecticut, according to local reports, and slippery road conditions were occurring. Several highway accidents were reported Wednesday morning. Bradley International Airport reports no flight delays or cancellations, and Metro-North trains are running on time.

New Jersey

The weather forced officials to lower the speed limit to 45 mph on the New Jersey Turnpike and on a section of the Garden State Parkway Tuesday. According to storm reports, the town of Livingston received five inches of new snowfall from Falco, the highest total in the state.

(MORE: Send Us Your Photos of Winter Storm Falco)

Rhode Island

Only minor effects of the storm were felt in Rhode Island. Burrillville reported the highest snow total from Falco, with an additional 2.5 inches of snow falling from the storm.

Maine

Behind the snow came biting cold. At 6 a.m. Wednesday, Portland was reporting a temperature of 18 degrees with a wind chill making it feel like 4 degrees. Public schools in Portland were closed because of the snowstorm.

In Lewiston and Auburn, Maine, the extreme cold temporarily shut down the bus system Tuesday after sub-zero temperatures froze air lines that run hydraulic and steering systems. It was so cold in Maine that power cables snapped in at least two locations, leaving about 950 homes and businesses without electricity and heat for a couple of hours in subzero temperatures.

New Hampshire

New Hampshire residents are shoveling about 3 to 6 inches of new snow in some spots just a few days after the first big storm of the season hit. Much of the snow fell during Tuesday afternoon and evening, with multiple spin-outs on the Everett Turnpike and Interstate 93. Highways were still slick Wednesday morning and speeds were lowered to 45 mph. A water main break in Concord affected 26 homes Tuesday night, but it wasn't immediately known if it was weather-related. Service was restored Wednesday morning.

Vermont

Slippery roads were blamed for accidents throughout the region, including two head-on collisions in Vermont, one of which killed a 46-year-old Bridport man Tuesday night.

MORE: Winter Storm Falco

Buildings in the Brooklyn borough are obscured during a morning snowstorm on December 17, 2013 in New York City. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)


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