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Weather.com's Top 100 Photos of 2013

By Camille Mann and Edecio Martinez
Published: January 1, 2014

The year 2013 packed a powerful punch. From the most destructive wildfire in Colorado history to a destructive tornado tearing through Oklahoma flattening entire neighborhoods, there was no shortage of weather events to capture.

However, the year’s most compelling images didn’t just consist of natural disasters. They were also inspiring photos of the natural world.

Other images that made weather.com’s list include a photo of the Milky Way from the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile, a photo of a cloud inversion filling the Grand Canyon and a polar bear swimming at the Moscow Zoo.

The collection features 100 images highlighting some of the best weather, news, travel and science images of 2013.

(MORE: Incredible Snow Art Created By Foot)

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