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Super Typhoon Haiyan Six Months Later: Devastation Persists in Tacloban (PHOTOS)

By Sean Breslin
Published: April 26, 2014

A young girl walks past three grounded ships in the coastal area renamed by residents 'Yolanda Village' on April 19, 2014 in Tacloban, Leyte, Philippines. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

It has been six months since Super Typhoon Haiyan ravaged several Philippine towns, killing at least 6,300 people and leaving millions homeless.

For Tacloban, a crowded town along the water that took one of the worst blows from Haiyan, the recovery has been arduous. Survivors live in the shadows of grounded ships, still resting on dry land, and dead bodies still being discovered. Just over one week ago, seven more bodies were found in Tacloban, according to GMA News.

More than 1,000 people are still missing from the massive storm that rushed ashore on Nov. 8, 2013.

(PHOTOS: A Look Back at the Devastation Caused By Haiyan)

"Haiyan's extreme death toll is another example of how deadly storm surge from tropical cyclones can be if you do not evacuate and seek shelter on higher ground," said weather.com meteorologist Chris Dolce. "Just a few years ago in 2008, Tropical Cyclone Nargis had an even higher death toll in Myanmar, mainly from storm surge flooding. An estimated 130,000 people were killed in the delta region of that country."

With more than 100,000 survivors still living in tents, authorities are working to build traditional housing by June, according to Time.com. But that's a tall order, and even if they are able to move everyone into sturdier houses before tropical cyclones begin to roar again, residents will have to survive future storms until the government can build permanent homes in 2015.

(MORE: On the Ground After Super Typhoon Haiyan)

After the storm, some survivors left the Philippines, electing to start a new life in other places, like Australia. It's an uphill climb for transplants as well because so many of the survivors watched everything they own get washed away by the storm.

Bill Van Doorn, his wife and kids left Palo, a city near Tacloban, to start a new life in Queensland, Australia after Haiyan. They arrived in Australia with only the two suitcases of clothing and documents that survived the storm. Now, they're asking the Australian government to lend a hand as they attempt to resume their lives, reports Australia Network News.

"I'm hoping we can get some sort of disaster relief, because we've come from an area where we've lost everything," said Van Doorn.


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