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Tropical Depression Flossie Soaks Hawaii One Last Day

July 30, 2013

Flossie, once a tropical storm, was downgraded to a tropical depression as of 5 pm Hawaii Standard Time, Monday.

Background

Radar

Radar

Radar

Radar

While dry air in the upper levels of the atmosphere and northerly winds aloft have created significant shear that weakened Flossie, there are still areas of locally heavy rain that will persist over parts of the island chain, including both windward and leeward locations, through Tuesday.

(INTERACTIVE:  Animated Radar Loop)

All of Hawaii remains under a flash flood watch and rain could be heavy enough to cause flash flooding, rockslides, and mudslides in higher terrain. 

(FORECASTS:  Honolulu Forecast)

Flossie will also produce occasional peak gusts up to 40 mph, particularly over ridge tops, along with high surf of 8-15 feet along east-facing shores.  Expect strong breaking waves and rip currents, as well.

Overall, Flossie is behaving similar to Hawaii's history of tropical cyclones; namely, the majority weaken to either a tropical depression or minimal tropical storm by the time they reach the islands, with a few notable exceptions.

It's worth noting of 19 named storms that have tracked near the Hawaiian Islands since 1957:

  • Only four remained at hurricane strength within 65 nautical miles, most notably Iniki (1992).  
  • Three of those four hurricanes approached the islands from the south or southeast.  
  • Only Kanoa (1957) was able to survive as a hurricane pushing due westward at a latitude equal or as far north as the Big Island.  (Though, according to NHC's best track database, it never made it as a hurricane to the Big Island.)
  • The large majority of those named storms had weakened to either a tropical storm, depression or remnant low when approaching the islands from the east, at a latitude at least as far north as the Big Island.  

Coincidentally, in 2007, the center of Hurricane Flossie passed just 100 miles south of the Big Island on August 14. However, impacts on land were not severe. Eastern Pacific tropical cyclone names are recycled every six years except for those destructive enough to be retired.

Background

Projected Path

Projected Path

Projected Path

Projected Path

Projected Path

The latest forecast path and wind speeds from the National Hurricane Center.

 

 


 

Background

Storm Information

Storm Information

Storm Information

Storm Information

Current Information

So, where exactly is the cyclone's center located now? If you're plotting the storm along with us, click on the "Current Information" map below to get the latitude/longitude coordinates, distance away from the nearest land location, maximum sustained winds and central pressure (measured in millibars).  
 

 

Background

Satellite

Satellite

Satellite

Satellite

Satellite

Click the magnifying glass to enlarge the image at left. Infrared satellite imagery is a sampling of the temperature of cloud tops. Brighter orange and red shadings signify colder cloud tops, indicative of healthy convection. If this is concentrated near the center of circulation, this signifies a healthy or intensifying tropical cyclone.

 

 

MORE:  Remembering Iniki 1992

Hurricane Iniki Satellite

Hurricane Iniki Satellite

NOAA

Satellite image of Hurricane Iniki making landfall over tbe island Kauai on September 11, 1992 at 1:58 p.m. HST. (Credit: NOAA)

  • Hurricane Iniki Satellite
  • Hurricane Iniki
  • Hurricane Iniki 1992
  • Hurricane Iniki Tree Damage
  • Hurricane Iniki Storm Surge
  • Hurricane Iniki Damage

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