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Train Carrying Crude Oil Derails on Philadelphia Bridge

By Allie Goolrick
Published: January 20, 2014

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A train hauling crude oil derailed on a narrow bridge in Philadelphia early Morning, narrowly avoiding an environmental disaster. 

A CSX freight train carrying six cars of crude oil derailed on the Schuylkill Arsenal Railroad Bridge over the Schuylkill Expressway and River near the University of Pennsylvania, leaving a tanker car and a boxcar dangling precariously off the tracks and over a highway and river.

According to CSX spokesman Gary Sease, the train was en route from Chicago to Philadelphia when seven cars at the rear of the 101-car train derailed around 12:30 a.m.

"Around the time of the crash skies were overcast and winds were gusting out of the west up to 25 miles per hour," said Weather Channel Meteorologist Alan Raymond. 

(MORE: Winter Storm Janus Ahead)

Police and firefighters responded to the scene, closing parts of the Schuylkill Expressway for several hours, reports CBS Philadelphia.

The Coast Guard says in a news release that a small crew on a boat is monitoring the derailment near the bridge and another team that monitors for pollution is also at the scene.

12 hours later, a sand car and an oil tanker remained tipped over on the bridge, according to NBC Philadelphia, but no leaking oil was reported was hazmat crews.

The cause of the derailment remains under investigation.

No injuries were reported.

"CSX would like to thank Philadelphia emergency first responders who arrived at the scene quickly and took prompt precautionary action," said a statement from CSX.

MORE: Train Derails in NYC

Cranes lift a derailed Metro-North train car, Monday, Dec. 2, 2013, in the Bronx borough of New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 


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