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25 Top U.S. Travel Destinations, Ranked By TripAdvisor (PHOTOS)

By Sean Breslin
Published: April 17, 2014

25. Miami, Fla.

25. Miami, Fla.

Miami fell 13 spots from last year's list to barely remain in the top-25. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

  • 25. Miami, Fla.
  • 24. Nashville, Tenn.
  • 23. St. Louis, Mo.
  • 22. Myrtle Beach, S.C.
  • 21. Phoenix, Ariz.
  • 20. Atlanta, Ga.
  • 19. Branson, Mo.
  • 18. Austin, Texas
  • 17. Palm Springs, Calif.
  • 16. San Antonio, Texas
  • 15. Portland, Ore.
  • 14. Boston, Mass.
  • 13. Charleston, S.C.
  • 12. Houston, Texas
  • 11. Honolulu, Hawaii
  • 10. Orlando, Fla.
  • 9. Washington, D.C.
  • 8. Seattle, Wash.
  • 7. San Diego, Calif.
  • 6. Los Angeles
  • 5. New Orleans
  • 4. Las Vegas
  • 3. San Francisco
  • 2. Chicago
  • 1. New York City

New York City continued its reign atop TripAdvisor's list of the best travel destinations in America, topping other cities like Chicago, San Francisco and Las Vegas.

(MORE: 5 Scenic Drives, and What You Can Do Along the Way)

Using a formula that measures the quantity and quality of hotel, attraction and restaurant reviews for each city, TripAdvisor selected the 25 highest-ranking cities from the last 12 months to compile its sixth annual list.

The travel company publishes a list each year of the top travel destinations worldwide – Instanbul, Turkey ranked as the top city in the world – but also releases specific lists for the United States, United Kingdom and several other regions.

Seven of the top 25 American destinations are new to this year's list, and 10 of the cities are located in the South. You can see the full top 25 list in the pictures above.

MORE: Cities With the Sunniest Outlooks

Indianapolis-Carmel, Ind., has a happiness ranking of 67.2, according to the latest Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index, giving it the number 50 spot on the list. Click through to countdown to the U.S.’s happiest city. (Wikimedia/Marduk)


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