Share

Four Indian Students Dead After Dam Release Swept Them Away; Dozens Still Missing

June 10, 2014

A sightseeing trip in a mountainous resort town in northern India turned tragic on Sunday after dozens of students were swept away by surging waters from a dam release while snapping pictures on a riverbank. Four bodies were recovered Monday morning, but 21 others are still missing with police calling the chances for survival "slim."

A group of 48 engineering students from the southern Indian city of Hyderabad were visiting the resort town of Manali, about 330 miles north of New Delhi. The engineering students were taking photos along the bank of the Beas River when a sudden discharge of water from a dam upstream caught them by surprise, according to the Associated Press. At least 24 students were washed away from the surge of water.

AP Photo

Bonath Shekar Naik shows a portrait of his son Rambabu, one of the students feared dead during a field trip near the mountain resort town of Manali. (AP Photo/ Mahesh Kumar A.)

Kiran Kumar, a professor accompanying the students, said he saw the water level rising and tried to tell the students to step back from the bank, but "within one or two seconds, the water level increased all of a sudden. Some of the students were washed away right in front of me," he told the Associated Press.

(MORE: Cost of Natural Disasters on the Rise)

One student said that he saw a "wall of water" swallow the students alongside the river and that they "disappeared under the waves."

The Indian Express reports that authorities released water from an upstream reservoir without any warning. The incident prompted fury from locals, who blocked the national highway in protest. Himachal Pradesh Chief Minister Virbhadra Singh demanded the dam's engineer be suspended while the incident is investigated.

Search efforts were ongoing Monday, but a shortage of boats and divers was hampering those operations.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

MORE: World's Most Polluted Rivers - Ganges, India

Polluted waste water flows into the Ganges river in Kanpur, in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh. (DIPTENDU DUTTA/AFP/Getty Images)


Featured Blogs

The Amazing Rains of May: Photos and Stats

By Dr. Jeff Masters
June 2, 2015

Now that May has mercifully drawn to a close, and the south-central states are drying out and cleaning up, we can take full measure of what an incredibly, destructively soggy month it was, especially for Texas and Oklahoma. Both states obliterated their rainfall records for any calendar month going back to 1895. The flooding killed at least 31 people, with 6 others missing as of Monday night, and inflicted tens of millions of dollars in damage.

Hottest Summers, Coldest Winters for Contiguous U.S.: A Few Years Loom Large

By Christopher C. Burt
May 28, 2015

Keeping track of all-time warmest/coldest daily maximum temperatures and all-time warmest/coldest months on record for any given site is a fairly easy task. However, very few NWS sites provide data concerning what their respective coldest climatological winters (December-February) or hottest climatological summers (June-August) have been. Researching 300 sites in the contiguous U.S. I have put together this summary for such. Below are the methods I used and some of the results, which proved quite interesting.

Please check out the new homepage and tell us what you think!

By Shaun Tanner
April 2, 2015

The development team here at Weather Underground has been hard at work producing a new homepage! Please take a look at the sneak peek and tell us what you think!

Meteorological images of the year - 2014

By Stu Ostro
December 30, 2014

My 9th annual edition.

2013-14 - An Interesting Winter From A to Z

By Tom Niziol
May 15, 2014

It was a very interesting winter across a good part of the nation from the Rockies through the Plains to the Northeast. Let's break down the most significant winter storms on a month by month basis.

What the 5th IPCC Assessment Doesn't Include

By Angela Fritz
September 27, 2013

Melting permafrost has the potential to release an additional 1.5 trillion tons of carbon into the atmosphere, and could increase our global average temperature by 1.5°F in addition to our day-to-day human emissions. However, this effect is not included in the IPCC report issued Friday morning, which means the estimates of how Earth's climate will change are likely on the conservative side.