Snow, Ice Lingers In New England (FORECAST)

By Chris Dolce
Published: March 31, 2014

An area of low pressure just off the Eastern Seaboard is interacting with just enough cold air to result in some accumulating snow and ice from the Appalachians through portions of the Northeast.


Current Radar

Current Radar

Current Radar

Current Radar

Monday Forecast

Monday Forecast

Monday Forecast

Monday Forecast

Most of the Northeast I-95 corridor is seeing mainly rain from this storm system. However, a few pockets of snow were reported in the Baltimore and Washington, D.C. areas on Sunday afternoon.

Below is a look at what to expect from this latest winter storm.

Snow, Ice Through Monday Night

  • Timing and locations: Through Monday for parts of New England, and into Monday night for parts of coastal eastern New England.
  • Precipitation types: While there may be a narrow stripe of plain snow, most areas will either see just rain (close to the coast) or a mixed back of snow, sleet, and freezing rain, along with possibly some rain. See inset maps and your local forecast page for specifics.
  • Snow, ice amounts: Patchy additional snow accumulations of 1 inch possible in northern and eastern Maine. In parts of this zone, ice glaze of one-tenth to one-quarter of an inch is possible. A widespread damaging ice storm is not expected.
  • Possible impacts: Slick travel conditions, particularly over bridges and overpasses in areas with a thin glaze of ice accumulation in parts of interior New England.
  • Winds: North winds of 15 to 30 mph are expected in many of the above-mentioned areas through Monday.

MORE: Deepest Snow in All 50 States

50. Florida: 4 inches

50. Florida: 4 inches

Milton, Fla., just northeast of Pensacola, had 4 inches of snow on the ground on March 6, 1954. It all fell in one day, making it the state's heaviest one-day snowfall as well. Image: Snow in Ocala on Jan. 9, 2010. (iWitness Weather/SONBON)

  • 50. Florida: 4 inches
  • 49. Hawaii: 5 inches
  • 47. (tie) Mississippi: 18 inches
  • 47. (tie) Georgia: 18 inches
  • 46. Alabama: 22 inches
  • 45. Louisiana: 24 inches
  • 44. Delaware: 25 inches
  • 43. Arkansas: 26 inches
  • 42. South Carolina: 29 inches
  • 41. Kentucky: 31 inches
  • 40. Texas: 33 inches
  • 38. (tie) Missouri: 36 inches
  • 38. (tie) Oklahoma: 36 inches
  • 37. Kansas: 40 inches
  • 36. Illinois: 41 inches
  • 35. Rhode Island: 42 inches
  • 34. Nebraska: 44 inches
  • 31. (tie) Indiana: 47 inches
  • 31. (tie) Ohio: 47 inches
  • 31. (tie) Virginia: 47 inches
  • 30. North Carolina: 50 inches
  • 28. (tie) New Jersey: 52 inches
  • 28. (tie) Iowa: 52 inches
  • 27. Maryland: 54 inches
  • 26. Connecticut: 55 inches
  • 25. Pennsylvania: 60 inches
  • 23. (tie) West Virginia: 62 inches
  • 23. (tie) Massachusetts: 62 inches
  • 22. Tennessee: 63 inches
  • 21. North Dakota: 65 inches
  • 20. South Dakota: 73 inches
  • 19. Wisconsin: 83 inches
  • 18. Maine: 84 inches
  • 17. Minnesota: 88 inches
  • 16. Arizona: 91 inches
  • 15. New Mexico: 96 inches
  • 14. Michigan: 117 inches
  • 13. New York: 119 inches
  • 12. Wyoming: 128 inches
  • 11. Montana: 147 inches
  • 10. Vermont: 149 inches
  • 9. New Hampshire: 164 inches
  • 8. Utah: 179 inches
  • 7. Idaho: 182 inches
  • 6. Alaska: 192 inches
  • 5. Colorado: 251 inches
  • 4. Oregon: 252 inches
  • 3. Nevada: 271 inches
  • 2. Washington: 367 inches
  • 1. California: 451 inches

Featured Blogs

Unseasonable Sandra: Hurricane Threat for Mexico, Torrential Rain in Southern Plains

By Dr. Jeff Masters
November 25, 2015

Holiday travel during the busy Saturday/Sunday Thanksgiving weekend across portions of the Southern Plains will get disrupted by a most unusual occurrence--flooding rains and a potential ice storm, enhanced by moisture from the strongest Eastern Pacific hurricane observed so late in the year. Declared a hurricane on Tuesday night, Sandra may reach Category 3 strength before weakening and approaching the Mexican coast on Friday or Saturday. Sandra's moisture will feed into a large-scale heavy rain event: flash flood watches are already in effect from far north Texas to southwest Illinois .On the northwest edge of the heavy rain swath, there should be a parallel strip with low-level temperatures cold enough for mostly light but widespread freezing rain, sleet, and/or snow, with an initial round from Thanksgiving Day into Friday and perhaps a second batch over the weekend as another lobe rotates around the sprawling upper-level low.

Incredible November Warmth for Portions of the U.S., Europe and Beyond

By Christopher C. Burt
November 10, 2015

The first 10 days of November 2015 have seen record-breaking warmth for many locations in Florida and elsewhere in the U.S. while all-time November monthly national heat records have so far been broken in the U.K., Ireland, France, Estonia, Slovenia, and Finland. All-time record heat (for any month) was also observed in parts of Australia and French Guiana. Here is a brief summary.

An extraordinary meteorological event; was one of its results a 1000-year flood?

By Stu Ostro
October 5, 2015

The confluence of meteorological ingredients the first weekend in October 2015 resulted in an extraordinary weather event with severe impacts. Was one of them a 1000-year flood?

Why the Arrest of a Science-Loving 14-year-old Matters

By Shaun Tanner
September 16, 2015

By now, many of you have heard or read about the arrest of Ahmed Mohamed, a 14-year-old high school student from Irving, Texas. Ahmed was arrested because school officials called the police after he showed one of his teachers his homemade clock. Mistaken for a bomb, Ahmed was taken into custody, interrogated, shamed, suspended (still on suspension today, Wednesday), and reprimanded. All of this after it has been found that the "device" he brought to school was indeed, a homemade clock.

2013-14 - An Interesting Winter From A to Z

By Tom Niziol
May 15, 2014

It was a very interesting winter across a good part of the nation from the Rockies through the Plains to the Northeast. Let's break down the most significant winter storms on a month by month basis.

What the 5th IPCC Assessment Doesn't Include

By Angela Fritz
September 27, 2013

Melting permafrost has the potential to release an additional 1.5 trillion tons of carbon into the atmosphere, and could increase our global average temperature by 1.5°F in addition to our day-to-day human emissions. However, this effect is not included in the IPCC report issued Friday morning, which means the estimates of how Earth's climate will change are likely on the conservative side.