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Snow, Ice Lingers In New England (FORECAST)

By Chris Dolce
Published: March 31, 2014

An area of low pressure just off the Eastern Seaboard is interacting with just enough cold air to result in some accumulating snow and ice from the Appalachians through portions of the Northeast.

Background

Current Radar

Current Radar

Current Radar

Current Radar
Background

Monday Forecast

Monday Forecast

Monday Forecast

Monday Forecast

Most of the Northeast I-95 corridor is seeing mainly rain from this storm system. However, a few pockets of snow were reported in the Baltimore and Washington, D.C. areas on Sunday afternoon.

Below is a look at what to expect from this latest winter storm.

Snow, Ice Through Monday Night

  • Timing and locations: Through Monday for parts of New England, and into Monday night for parts of coastal eastern New England.
  • Precipitation types: While there may be a narrow stripe of plain snow, most areas will either see just rain (close to the coast) or a mixed back of snow, sleet, and freezing rain, along with possibly some rain. See inset maps and your local forecast page for specifics.
  • Snow, ice amounts: Patchy additional snow accumulations of 1 inch possible in northern and eastern Maine. In parts of this zone, ice glaze of one-tenth to one-quarter of an inch is possible. A widespread damaging ice storm is not expected.
  • Possible impacts: Slick travel conditions, particularly over bridges and overpasses in areas with a thin glaze of ice accumulation in parts of interior New England.
  • Winds: North winds of 15 to 30 mph are expected in many of the above-mentioned areas through Monday.

MORE: Deepest Snow in All 50 States

50. Florida: 4 inches

50. Florida: 4 inches

Milton, Fla., just northeast of Pensacola, had 4 inches of snow on the ground on March 6, 1954. It all fell in one day, making it the state's heaviest one-day snowfall as well. Image: Snow in Ocala on Jan. 9, 2010. (iWitness Weather/SONBON)

  • 50. Florida: 4 inches
  • 49. Hawaii: 5 inches
  • 47. (tie) Mississippi: 18 inches
  • 47. (tie) Georgia: 18 inches
  • 46. Alabama: 22 inches
  • 45. Louisiana: 24 inches
  • 44. Delaware: 25 inches
  • 43. Arkansas: 26 inches
  • 42. South Carolina: 29 inches
  • 41. Kentucky: 31 inches
  • 40. Texas: 33 inches
  • 38. (tie) Missouri: 36 inches
  • 38. (tie) Oklahoma: 36 inches
  • 37. Kansas: 40 inches
  • 36. Illinois: 41 inches
  • 35. Rhode Island: 42 inches
  • 34. Nebraska: 44 inches
  • 31. (tie) Indiana: 47 inches
  • 31. (tie) Ohio: 47 inches
  • 31. (tie) Virginia: 47 inches
  • 30. North Carolina: 50 inches
  • 28. (tie) New Jersey: 52 inches
  • 28. (tie) Iowa: 52 inches
  • 27. Maryland: 54 inches
  • 26. Connecticut: 55 inches
  • 25. Pennsylvania: 60 inches
  • 23. (tie) West Virginia: 62 inches
  • 23. (tie) Massachusetts: 62 inches
  • 22. Tennessee: 63 inches
  • 21. North Dakota: 65 inches
  • 20. South Dakota: 73 inches
  • 19. Wisconsin: 83 inches
  • 18. Maine: 84 inches
  • 17. Minnesota: 88 inches
  • 16. Arizona: 91 inches
  • 15. New Mexico: 96 inches
  • 14. Michigan: 117 inches
  • 13. New York: 119 inches
  • 12. Wyoming: 128 inches
  • 11. Montana: 147 inches
  • 10. Vermont: 149 inches
  • 9. New Hampshire: 164 inches
  • 8. Utah: 179 inches
  • 7. Idaho: 182 inches
  • 6. Alaska: 192 inches
  • 5. Colorado: 251 inches
  • 4. Oregon: 252 inches
  • 3. Nevada: 271 inches
  • 2. Washington: 367 inches
  • 1. California: 451 inches

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