Dog Stranded On Lake St. Clair Ice and Rescued by Coast Guard Reunited With Owners
Published: March 6, 2014

U.S. Coast Guard photo courtesy of Kim Gordus

Jodi Benchich (right), owner of the lost dog rescued by the Coast Guard on Monday, and Michelle Heyza, founder of A Rejoyceful Rescue, are all smiles during their time with KC at Wilson Veterinary Hospital, March 5, 2014.

A dog missing for a month and rescued by the Coast Guard from the ice of Lake St. Clair has been reunited with its owners.

Turns out, the dog's name is KC. The Coast Guard crew members who rescued him Monday about 5 miles from land off the Detroit suburb of St. Clair Shores had named him Lucky.

Jodi Benchich and her father, David, greeted KC on Wednesday evening at Wilson Veterinary Hospital in Macomb County's Washington Township, the Detroit Free Press and The Macomb Daily of Mount Clemens reported.

AP Photo/U.S. Coast Guard

The dog was spotted about 5 miles from land off the Detroit suburb of St. Clair Shores.

 The dog is expected to be okay. On Wednesday, he had a blue bandage on his right leg and was getting intravenous fluids. During the reunion, KC quickly began wagging his tail and licking Jodi Benchich's face.

Benchich said KC had been missing since late February, when he got away from the family's backyard in the Detroit suburb of St. Clair Shores. This week, she saw a TV news report about the rescue.

"As soon as I found out the Coast Guard saved him, I called them and thanked them like crazy," she said.

Chief Petty Officer Alan Haraf said the stranded dog may have been on the ice for a couple of days.

The dog, which initially was seen in the distance with what appeared to be a group of foxes, had a harness and collar but no identifying tag, the Coast Guard said. The other animals scurried away, Haraf said.

"They noticed three burrows the dog tried to dig for itself for protection," Haraf said. "They said the paws were bleeding and the nails were pretty much down to nothing."

(MORE: Great Lakes Ice Cover Nears All-Time Record)

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