Earthquakes Rattle Oklahoma City Area

December 29, 2013

USGS/Google Maps

This map shows the location of the 4.1-magnitude earthquake that rattled an area north of Oklahoma City early Sunday.

OKLAHOMA CITY -- The U.S. Geological Survey says a 4.1 magnitude earthquake rattled an area about 30 miles north-northeast of Oklahoma City early Sunday and was followed by a smaller quake hours later in the state. There were no reports of any injuries or damages from either temblor.

Geophysicist Randy Baldwin at the USGS National Earthquake Information Center in Golden, Colo., said the larger quake at 2:14 a.m. CST was centered 4.3 miles southwest of Langston and prompted several dozen reports from residents who felt the ground shake. But he told The Associated Press by phone that no area resident had reported feeling the 2.5 magnitude quake centered near Jones, recorded at 5:34 a.m.

Baldwin said Oklahoma has sporadically recorded several minor quakes in recent months but those are without any discernible pattern.

MORE: Philippines Rocked by Earthquake in October

A crane sifts through the rubble of the damaged Our Lady of Assumption Parish church following a 7.1-magnitude earthquake, at Dauis in Bohol, central Philippines, Tuesday Oct. 15, 2013. (AP Photo)

Featured Blogs

Ex-Hurricane Oho Going Where Few Hurricanes Have Gone Before: Alaska

By Dr. Jeff Masters
October 8, 2015

Alaska and British Columbia are on alert to receive a very unusual dose of tropical weather: the remains of Hurricane Oho, which are on track to hurtle into the Alaska Panhandle on Friday evening. Oho completed the transition from a hurricane to an extratropical storm with 70 mph winds on Thursday morning, and after short period of weakening, is expected to interact with a powerful jet stream over the Gulf of Alaska and intensify on Friday afternoon off the coast of Alaska into a powerful 960 mb low pressure system with near-hurricane-force winds and heavy rain.

An extraordinary meteorological event; was one of its results a 1000-year flood?

By Stu Ostro
October 5, 2015

The confluence of meteorological ingredients the first weekend in October 2015 resulted in an extraordinary weather event with severe impacts. Was one of them a 1000-year flood?

Why the Arrest of a Science-Loving 14-year-old Matters

By Shaun Tanner
September 16, 2015

By now, many of you have heard or read about the arrest of Ahmed Mohamed, a 14-year-old high school student from Irving, Texas. Ahmed was arrested because school officials called the police after he showed one of his teachers his homemade clock. Mistaken for a bomb, Ahmed was taken into custody, interrogated, shamed, suspended (still on suspension today, Wednesday), and reprimanded. All of this after it has been found that the "device" he brought to school was indeed, a homemade clock.

Hottest Summer on Record for Much of the Pacific Northwest

By Christopher C. Burt
September 7, 2015

The summer of 2015 is likely to go down as the warmest such on record for much of the Pacific Northwest, especially for the states of Washington and Oregon. It was also anomalously warm in other parts of the country. Here are some of the details.

2013-14 - An Interesting Winter From A to Z

By Tom Niziol
May 15, 2014

It was a very interesting winter across a good part of the nation from the Rockies through the Plains to the Northeast. Let's break down the most significant winter storms on a month by month basis.

What the 5th IPCC Assessment Doesn't Include

By Angela Fritz
September 27, 2013

Melting permafrost has the potential to release an additional 1.5 trillion tons of carbon into the atmosphere, and could increase our global average temperature by 1.5°F in addition to our day-to-day human emissions. However, this effect is not included in the IPCC report issued Friday morning, which means the estimates of how Earth's climate will change are likely on the conservative side.