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St. Patrick's Day Weather History in New York City (INFOGRAPHIC)

By Jon Erdman
Published: March 15, 2014

How often does St. Patrick's Day weather in New York City resemble "Erin Go Blah?" 

(FORECASTS: NYC local forecast)

Our infographic below lays out holiday snow, rain and temperature statistics for the Big Apple, dating to 1872, courtesy of the National Weather Service office in Upton, N.Y.

Mouse over each chart to see each statistic.


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