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Nebraska Tornadoes: Large Twisters Reported Near Coleridge and Mullen, No Injuries Reported

By Sean Breslin
Published: June 18, 2014

Just one day after deadly tornadoes raked several small towns in northeastern Nebraska, the area was under fire from severe weather yet again, as at least two large twisters were spawned in the state Tuesday night.

Spotters confirmed a large wedge tornado was on the ground near Coleridge at around 9 p.m. local time Tuesday night, just 45 miles north of Pilger, where an EF4 tornado destroyed most of the town Monday evening. This time, the massive funnel stayed away from towns, damaging mostly farmland.

"Tuesday evening, similar to Monday evening, a lone supercell spawned several tornadoes in northeast Nebraska," said weather.com senior meteorologist Jon Erdman. "Fortunately, these multi-vortex tornadoes did not carve through the towns of Coleridge and Laurel as they did in Pilger the previous evening."

(MORE: Track Severe Weather Here)

Omaha.com reported there may have been two tornadoes in the area Tuesday night. A second tornado that was described as large and very slow-moving was spotted near the town of Laurel, 12 miles southeast of Coleridge.

Meteorologist Scott Dergan says it didn't appear that those storms hit populated areas, but some farmsteads were damaged. The Cedar County Sheriff's Office had no reports of injuries.

Northeastern Nebraska has been a magnet for large tornadoes recently, said Erdman. On Oct. 4, an EF4 tornado hit the city of Wayne after touching down in Stanton – where Monday evening's deadly tornadoes were first spawned. The NWS confirmed four tornadoes hit the region Monday night; all were rated EF3 or higher.

(MORE: How You Can Help the Victims of Pilger)

Another tornado was confirmed by the National Weather Service in the central part of the state near Mullen, located in Hooker County. Meteorologist Darren Snively in the North Platte office says radar, spotter reports and pictures show that three tornadoes touched down Tuesday night in Cherry and Hooker counties, in the northwestern part of the state.

In all, there were 35 tornado reports across five states on Tuesday, the National Weather Service said. Still, it's very unlikely that 35 tornadoes were spawned – many of those reports could have been from the same tornado, and NWS surveys of the affected areas will provide a more accurate tornado total once completed.

Information from the Associated Press was used in this report.


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