Share

Company Seals Gas Well Leak off Louisiana Coast

July 13, 2013

Leaking natural gas wells a few miles north of Ewing Bank in the Gulf of Mexico on July 10, 2013. (Billy Dugger with On Wings Of Care)

NEW ORLEANS — A gas well that started leaking several days ago in the Gulf of Mexico off the Louisiana coast was sealed Friday, but more work must be done to permanently secure the well, federal officials said.

Eileen Angelico, a spokeswoman for the federal Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, said Energy Resource Technology LLC began sealing the well Thursday evening. The process, approved by BSEE, involved pumping drilling fluid into the well about 75 miles southwest of Port Fourchon.

"More work is required to permanently secure the well," Angelico said in a statement from BSEE. "In the interim, BSEE is requiring that ERT monitor the well for any changes."

(MORE: Here's What Climate Change SOUNDS Like)

Company officials said the well had been out of production for years and was being permanently plugged when it began leaking small amounts of gas and an oil-water mixture called condensate on Monday.

The Coast Guard said a small sheen was visible on the Gulf surface, but company officials expect it to evaporate.

The well did not suffer a blowout, and there was no explosion.

Preparations and work to permanently seal the well are expected to continue through the weekend, Angelico said.

(PHOTOS: A Wildfire Threatens Las Vegas?)

The Houston-based Talos Energy platform sits over three wells in water 144 feet deep. Production from the other two wells was shut down after the leak was found on Monday. A small number of workers on the platform were safely evacuated.

The Talos site is to the west of BP PLC's Macondo well, which blew out in April 2010. An estimated 200 million gallons of crude oil escaped the well before it was capped. The Macondo well was about a mile under the Gulf surface.

Coast Guard officials said the Talos incident is nowhere near the scope of the BP event.

MORE: Arkansas Oil Leak in April

Mayflower, Ark.

Mayflower, Ark.

A member of ExxonMobil's cleanup crew is reflected in water and oil in a drainage ditch along State Highway 365 in Mayflower, Ark., Monday, April 1, 2013. (AP Photo/Log Cabin Democrat, Courtney Spradlin)

  • Mayflower, Ark.
  • Mayflower, Ark.
  • Mayflower, Ark.
  • Mayflower, Ark.
  • Mayflower, Ark.

Featured Blogs

Top Ten Weather Stories of 2014

By Dr. Jeff Masters
December 23, 2014

The top ten weather stories of 2014 include: #1: Earth Likely Had Its Warmest Year on Record; #2: Monsoon Floods in the India-Pakistan Border Region Kill 648; #3: India's Cyclone Hudhud Does $11 Billion in Damage; #4: Southeastern Brazil's Worst Drought in 50 years; and #5: The California Drought.

November 2014 Global Weather Extremes Summary

By Christopher C. Burt
December 18, 2014

November was globally the 7th warmest such on record according to NOAA and 8th according to NASA (see Jeff Master’s blog for more about this). It was a cold month in the U.S. with some phenomenal lake-effect snowstorms. A powerful storm, dubbed a ‘Medicane’ formed in the Mediterranean Sea. Deadly floods occurred in Morocco, Italy, and Switzerland. It was the warmest November on record for Australia, Italy, Austria and much of Southeast Asia.Below are some of the month’s highlights.

Live Blog: Tracking Hurricane Arthur as it Approaches North Carolina Coast

By Shaun Tanner
July 3, 2014

This is a live blog set up to provide the latest coverage on Hurricane Arthur as it threatens the North Carolina Coast. Check back often to see what the latest is with Arthur. The most recent updates are at the top.

Tropical Terminology

By Stu Ostro
June 30, 2014

Here is some basic, fundamental terminology related to tropical cyclones. Rather than a comprehensive and/or technical glossary, this represents the essence of the meaning & importance of some key, frequently used terms.

2013-14 - An Interesting Winter From A to Z

By Tom Niziol
May 15, 2014

It was a very interesting winter across a good part of the nation from the Rockies through the Plains to the Northeast. Let's break down the most significant winter storms on a month by month basis.

What the 5th IPCC Assessment Doesn't Include

By Angela Fritz
September 27, 2013

Melting permafrost has the potential to release an additional 1.5 trillion tons of carbon into the atmosphere, and could increase our global average temperature by 1.5°F in addition to our day-to-day human emissions. However, this effect is not included in the IPCC report issued Friday morning, which means the estimates of how Earth's climate will change are likely on the conservative side.