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Tornado Touches Down Near Miami International Airport

By Sean Breslin
Published: May 19, 2014

A tornado threat came to Miami Thursday afternoon when a tornado was in progress just to the west of Miami International Airport, as confirmed by air traffic controllers at the hub.

The National Weather Service relayed the report, which stated the tornado touched down one mile west of the airport. There were no immediate reports of injuries. Southwest of the airport, wind damage was reported by the NWS near the intersection of 82nd Avenue and 14th Street.

(MORE: Track the Threat of Severe Weather)

As a result, flights at Miami International Airport were delayed by an average of more than one hour, according to the flight-tracking website Flight Aware. Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport was also experiencing delays as the storms moved through.

Several reports of waterspouts also came in via social media from nearby areas.

On Thursday evening, the National Weather Service in Miami rated the tornado an EF0, packing maximum estimated wind speeds of 65 mph. The NWS states that the tornado's path was a quarter of a mile long and 10 yards wide. The tornado tracked east-northeast along 14th street into Doral, damaging trees, street signs and a vehicle along the way.


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