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Labor Day Weekend Forecast: Will Storms Impact Holiday Travel, Plans?

By Linda Lam
Published: September 1, 2014

Will your last unofficial weekend of summer be rained out by thunderstorms or will you be able to bask in the summer sun?

Moisture from the Gulf of Mexico will be tapped by a system moving across the South and East this Labor Day weekend. This system will bring thunderstorms and warm temperatures ahead of it to the eastern third of the country. Locally heavy rain and dangerous lightning may accompany some of these thunderstorms.

Another vigorous frontal system will shift out of the Rockies into the nation's mid-section, not only triggering severe thunderstorms ahead of it, but ushering in a cool, fall-like air mass behind it

Northeast

High temperatures generally will be warmer than average on Labor Day and it will be humid as well. Plans may have to be flexible as the risk for thunderstorms will continue. Some of these thunderstorms will have heavy downpours, frequent lightning and gusty winds.

(FORECAST: NYC | Wash., D.C. | Pittsburgh)

South

Labor Day thunderstorms should be less numerous than on Sunday in most areas, except the corridor from Virginia to northern Florida and in Louisiana and the Upper Texas coast. Heat and humidity will be widespread, as highs will top out at least in the 90s in most areas. Record highs may fall again in parts of West Texas, where temperatures will soar into the 100s.

(FORECAST: Atlanta | Miami | Dallas)

Midwest

Thunderstorms shift farther east on Labor Day and it may be a soaker from the Great Lakes to the mid-Mississippi Valley ahead of a cold front. Some of these storms will be severe with large hail and damaging wind gusts. Muggy mid-upper 80s (and a few low 90s) are possible in the Ohio and mid-Mississippi Valleys ahead of the front, while 70s and a few 60s will be the rule behind the front in the Upper Midwest and northern Plains, where a few showers can't be ruled out.

(FORECAST: Chicago | St. Louis | Minneapolis)

West

Dry conditions will prevail throughout most of the West on Labor Day, with just a few thunderstorms in the northern and central Rockies. It will feel more like fall in the northern Rockies where high temperatures will be below average and a few flakes of snow are even possible in some of the higher elevations. Otherwise high temperatures will be near to above average. 

(FORECAST: Seattle | Los Angeles | Yellowstone National Park)

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