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Hurricane Arthur: Dangerous Flash Flooding Slams New England After Outer Banks, Southeast Virginia Take Hit

July 4, 2014

Hurricane Arthur as of 8 p.m. EDT

- Arthur has maximum sustained winds of 80 mph. Its center is located 95 miles south-southwest of Chatham, MA, and is racing northeast at 28 mph.
- Dangerous flash flooding has developed over southeast Massachusetts as Arthur's rainbands interact with a frontal boundary.
- Flash flood warnings continue through late Friday evening for much of southeastern Massachusetts. New Bedford has been hardest hit, with nearly 7 inches of rain.
- A tropical storm warning is in effect for Nantucket and for Cape Cod from Provincetown to Woods Hole, Massachusetts.
- A non-tropical high wind warning is in effect for Hancock and Washington counties of Downeast Maine on Saturday.
- In Canada, a tropical storm warning is in effect for Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island as well as portions of New Brunswick.

(MORE: Live Blog | Photos)

Hurricane Arthur has become the first hurricane to make landfall in the continental U.S. since Isaac struck Louisiana on Aug. 28-29, 2012. (Sandy, in October 2012, became post-tropical shortly before landfall.) It's the first hurricane of Category 2 or greater strength to make landfall in the Lower 48 since Hurricane Ike struck Texas on Sept. 13, 2008.

Arthur made landfall earlier on the calendar than any other known hurricane in North Carolina history.

Hurricane Arthur made its first landfall over the Shackleford Banks, between Cape Lookout and Beaufort, North Carolina, at 11:15 p.m. EDT Thursday. After spending some time over Pamlico Sound and brushing mainland parts of Dare and Hyde counties, the center of Arthur then crossed over the northern Outer Banks of North Carolina near Nags Head around 4:30 a.m. EDT Friday.

The peak reported land gust was 101 mph at Cape Lookout, North Carolina as Arthur approached its first landfall point. A 4.65 foot storm surge (above normal tide levels) was reported in Oregon Inlet, North Carolina Friday morning, mainly from the sound (as opposed to ocean) side.

Now, the center of Arthur is back out over the Atlantic. The center is expected to bypass parts of southeastern New England and then move towards Nova Scotia, but heavy rain is affecting areas well away from Arthur's center.

Here's the latest information on this dangerous storm.

Hurricane and Tropical Storm Watches/Warnings

Background

Warnings

Warnings

A tropical storm or hurricane watch is issued when those conditions are possible within the area. Watches are typically posted 48 hours in advance of the onset of tropical storm-force conditions, since preparing for the storm becomes difficult once tropical storm-force winds begin. A tropical storm or hurricane warning means those conditions are expected in the area. Warnings are typically issued 36 hours in advance of the onset of tropical storm-force winds. When a warning is issued, you should complete all storm preparations and, if directed by local officials, evacuate the area immediately. 

Background

Arthur: Current Radar

Arthur: Current Radar

Hurricane Arthur Radar

Arthur's eye is now out over the Atlantic. However, extremely heavy rain bands are drenching southeastern New England as Arthur's moisture collides with a stationary front. Several flash flood warnings are in effect for southeastern Massachusetts. Waterspouts have been reported on Lake Winnipesaukee in New Hampshire Friday evening. Check the live blog for breaking weather details.

Below is a timeline along with potential impacts along the East Coast and Atlantic Canada:

Background

Projected Path

Projected Path

Above: The latest forecast path and wind speeds from the National Hurricane Center.

Forecast Timeline

         - Friday evening and Friday night: Arthur continues northeast across the open Atlantic, making its closest approach to passing Cape Cod and Nantucket Island Friday evening into the wee hours of Saturday.

         - Saturday: Arthur races northeastward into Atlantic Canada, reaching Nova Scotia and New Brunswick in the late morning or afternoon hours as it transitions to a strong post-tropical low pressure system. The center of Arthur should cross over Prince Edward Island Saturday evening or Saturday night.

Background

Rain Forecast: Northeast

Rain Forecast: Northeast

Potential Impacts

Here is a layout of potential impacts by region.

(NWS LOCAL IMPACT STATEMENTS: Massachusetts | Maine)

        - Rhode Island and eastern Massachusetts, including Nantucket and Cape Cod: Extremely heavy rainfall is leading to dangerous, potentially life-threatening flash flooding. Flooding will continue through the evening hours with over 1 inch of rain per hour at times, leading to storm totals locally in excess of 8 inches. Tropical storm-force gusts have arrived in southeastern Massachusetts, and sustained tropical storm-force winds are possible Friday evening into the wee hours of Saturday. Some power outages, minor beach erosion and minor coastal flooding are possible. Rain should begin to diminish later Friday night into early Saturday.

        - New Hampshire and Maine: Locally heavy rain is expected, with isolated rainfall totals of more than 6 inches possible in Downeast Maine. Non-tropical high wind warnings have been issued for Downeast Maine as well, with sustained winds over 40 mph possible at the coast. Showers and windy conditions will continue into Saturday, but skies will clear Saturday night.

        - Canadian Maritimes: Strong winds, heavy rain, and some coastal water rise is expected in Nova Scotia as Arthur transitions to a strong post-tropical low and moves in Saturday. The low will then track over Newfoundland Sunday in a somewhat weakened state.

(FORECAST: NantucketHalifax)

High Tide Times

- Fall River, Massachusetts: 1:58 a.m. Saturday
- Nantucket Island, Massachusetts: 6:27 a.m. Saturday

(MORE: High/low tide times for your area via NOAA)

We have additional maps below, which will give you an idea how strong Arthur is right now.

Background

Storm Information

Storm Information

Current Position

So, where exactly is the cyclone's center located now? If you're plotting the storm along with us, the information depicted in the map above provides the latitude/longitude coordinates, distance away from the nearest land location, maximum sustained winds and central pressure (measured in millibars).  

 

Background

Infrared Satellite

Infrared Satellite

Infrared Satellite

This infrared satellite image shows how cold (and therefore how high) the cloud tops are. Brighter orange and red shadings concentrated near the center of circulation signify a healthy tropical cyclone.

 

Background

Visible Satellite

Visible Satellite

Visible Satellite (only during daylight hours)

This visible satellite image helps meteorologists pinpoint the low-level circulation center during daylight hours. In cases of strong wind shear (stronger winds aloft than near the surface, sometimes from different directions), one can spot an exposed circulation center, with convection blown downstream. This is an indication of a weakening tropical cyclone.

Check back with us at weather.com and The Weather Channel for the latest updates on this Fourth of July holiday week storm.

(MORE: Expert Analysis | WeatherREADY hurricane safety | Hurricane Central)

MORE: Hurricane Arthur Photos

Fairhaven, MA

Fairhaven, MA

Residents attempt to move a car out of a flooded street in Fairhaven, MA (Photo: Twitter/thatshawesome)

  • Fairhaven, MA
  • New Bedford, MA
  • Hatteras Island, NC
  • Hatteras Island, NC
  • Avalon, NC
  • Avalon, NC
  • Cape Cod, MA
  • Nags Head, NC
  • Manteo, NC
  • Manteo, NC
  • Kill Devil Hills, NC
  • Nags Head, NC
  • Manteo, NC
  • Atlantic Beach, NC
  • Nags Head, NC
  • Kill Devil Hills, NC
  • North Carolina
  • North Carolina
  • Outer Banks, NC
  • Outer Banks, NC
  • Nag's Head, NC
  • Arthur from Space
  • Atlantic Ocean Off Florida's East Coast
  • Arthur from Space
  • Oregon Inlet, North Carolina
  • National Hurricane Center, Miami
  • Cape Hatteras, North Carolina
  • Cape Hatteras, North Carolina
  • Oregon Inlet, North Carolina
  • Cape Hatteras, North Carolina
  • Cape Hatteras, North Carolina
  • Cape Hatteras, North Carolina
  • Cape Hatteras, North Carolina
  • Cape Hatteras, North Carolina
  • Cape Hatteras, North Carolina
  • Cape Hatteras, North Carolina

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