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Fort Washington, Maryland, Homes Evacuated After 'Slope Failure'

May 7, 2014

Prince George's County Fire Dept./Twitter

The Prince George's FIre Department works with police and family services to evacuate homes in Fort Washington, Maryland.

More than two dozen homes were evacuated in Fort Washington, Maryland, a community that borders Washington, D.C., Monday afternoon after what has been described as a "slope failure."

According to WUSA 9, the failure happened during the weekend, collapsing part of Piscataway Drive. When conditions deteriorated Monday, causing a water main break and a sewer failure, officials decided to evacuate homes.

Prince Georges' County officials told the Washington Post that the soil, which contains Marlboro clay, is known to become unstable when exposed to air and water. Significant rainfall last week may have caused the ground to shift, they said.

At least five of the houses were "directly affected" according to WJLA. The TV station reports that the homes are on a dead-end road, which made access tricky for first responders.

The Prince George's County Fire Department, along with police and family services, were going door to door to alert residents of the danger.

There were no reported injuries.

According to the 2010 Census, more than 23,000 people live in Fort Washington.

MORE: Out-of-Control Wildfire in Oklahoma

Firefighters work to extinguish a flare-up on Monday, May 5, 2014, in Guthrie, Okla. (AP Photo/Nick Oxford)


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